U.S. markets close in 2 hours 31 minutes
  • S&P 500

    4,447.04
    -8.44 (-0.19%)
     
  • Dow 30

    34,924.87
    +126.87 (+0.36%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    14,966.67
    -81.02 (-0.54%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    2,282.77
    +34.69 (+1.54%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    75.43
    +1.45 (+1.96%)
     
  • Gold

    1,752.20
    +0.50 (+0.03%)
     
  • Silver

    22.68
    +0.26 (+1.16%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.1708
    -0.0010 (-0.08%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    1.4790
    +0.0190 (+1.30%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3704
    +0.0023 (+0.17%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    110.9620
    +0.2770 (+0.25%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    43,070.36
    -177.28 (-0.41%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,068.04
    -33.48 (-3.04%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,063.40
    +11.92 (+0.17%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    30,240.06
    -8.75 (-0.03%)
     

A Smartwatch Could Give Your PIN to Hackers

From Popular Mechanics

A new study from Binghamton University suggests that your smartwatch may inadvertently give hackers access to your password.

The researchers used data from a smartwatch's motion sensors to reproduce a trajectory of the wearer's hand movements, which can be accurate down to the millimeter level. Hackers could theoretically use this to figure out password keys, PIN codes, and all manner of secret things we do with our hands.

Crucially, this information isn't even all that secure. The researchers were able to gain access to it in a number of ways, such as infecting your phone or smartwatch with malware, or intercepting the bluetooth signal from your watch. Once they had that information, the researchers were able to successfully guess a user's PIN on the first try 80 percent of the time, and 90 percent of the time with three tries.

If you wear a smartwatch, you may want to type your passwords using your other hand from now on. If you wear a smartwatch on both hands, well, I really don't know what to tell you.

Source: The Next Web