OGZPY - Public Joint Stock Company Gazprom

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
6.84
+0.03 (+0.37%)
At close: 3:58PM EDT
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Previous Close6.81
Open6.86
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range6.82 - 6.90
52 Week Range4.13 - 7.89
Volume375,636
Avg. Volume1,080,941
Market Cap76.272B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.36
PE Ratio (TTM)2.04
EPS (TTM)3.35
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.53 (7.73%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-17
1y Target Est9.80
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Is SPDR S&P Emerging Markets Dividend ETF (EDIV) a Strong ETF Right Now?
    Zacks13 days ago

    Is SPDR S&P Emerging Markets Dividend ETF (EDIV) a Strong ETF Right Now?

    Smart Beta ETF report for EDIV

  • Bloomberg28 days ago

    Ukrainian Oligarch Firtash Loses Fight Over U.S. Extradition

    (Bloomberg) -- Austria’s highest court backed a U.S. request to extradite Dmitry Firtash on corruption charges, giving a green light for the Ukrainian tycoon to be sent to the U.S. for trial, possibly in the coming weeks.The Supreme Court dismissed complaints by Firtash’s lawyers and by Austria’s Attorney General, who had both argued that the case is motivated by U.S. interests in influencing Ukraine’s politics.Presiding Judge Michael Danek said on Tuesday there were no reasons to cancel a ruling by a lower court, which had earlier approved the extradition. The decision to hand him over now lies with the Austrian Ministry of Justice.Neither Firtash nor the Attorney General were able to rebut the lower court’s reasoning that the U.S. tradition of democracy and rule of law would ensure Firtash’s rights to a fair trial, Danek said as he delivered the ruling at the court in Vienna.“We are disappointed in today’s decision,” Firtash’s U.S. lawyers Dan Webb and Lanny Davis said in a statement. “In any event, nothing has changed regarding Mr. Firtash’s innocence and the absence of evidence that he is guilty of any crime.”Firtash, who made much of his fortune in the gas trade and expanded into chemicals and television, is one of Ukraine’s most powerful men. He has deep ties to Russia, having profited from deals with gas giant Gazprom PJSC and businessmen from the inner circle of President Vladimir Putin, adding to his potential interest for U.S. law enforcement.Firtash’s defense team, led by former Austrian Justice Minister Dieter Boehmdorfer, had argued that the U.S. was trying to sideline him for his pro-Russian views.U.S. prosecutors are seeking Firtash, a one-time ally of ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, on allegations he led a conspiracy to pay $18.5 million to Indian officials to facilitate a $500 million titanium project there. Firtash denied the charges.“We are confident that a jury will find Mr. Firtash not guilty of all charges if and when he goes to trial,” his U.S. lawyers said.The U.S. has been investigating Firtash since at least 2008, after he emerged as a major shareholder in a little-known company that controlled much of the multi-billion-dollar gas trade between Russia and Ukraine. The request to extradite Firtash led to his arrest in 2014 in Vienna.Austrian caretaker Justice Minister Clemens Jabloner will wait for the court’s written ruling and will consult Foreign Minister Alexander Schallenberg before deciding about the extradition request, his spokeswoman said. Firtash’s lawyer told a U.S. judge earlier this month he could be in the U.S. as soon as early July. His representatives couldn’t immediately be reached for comment Tuesday on whether this forecast still holds.In addition to Gazprom, his Russian partners include ally Arkady Rotenberg, a longtime Putin friend who is subject to U.S. sanctions. Another Rotenberg ally, Vasily Anisimov, lent Firtash the money to post 125 million euros in bail in Austria while the extradition request was being heard. Gazprombank, one of Russia’s largest lenders, has regularly backed Firtash’s projects.In a 2014 interview with Bloomberg, Firtash said there’s nothing that U.S. prosecutors could offer him that would entice him to reveal what he knows about Russia’s gas business.(Updates with Firtash lawyer comment about timing of extradition in 11th paragraph.)\--With assistance from Daryna Krasnolutska.To contact the reporter on this story: Boris Groendahl in Vienna at bgroendahl@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Andrew LangleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trump Doesn’t Need to Sanction Russian Gas
    Bloomberglast month

    Trump Doesn’t Need to Sanction Russian Gas

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Donald Trump doesn’t have to impose sanctions on Russia’s controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline to Germany if he wants Europe to buy more U.S. liquefied natural gas. The market is doing his work for him.Increasing competition is already reducing the European Union’s dependence on Russian exports, and U.S. LNG is an increasingly important factor in determining prices.Asked during an appearance with Polish President Andrzej Duda whether he would use sanctions to block Nord Stream 2, the U.S. president said he was “looking at it” and “thinking about it” because “we’re protecting Germany from Russia. And Russia is getting billions and billions of dollars of money from Germany.”This made headlines because it appeared to repeat earlier threats from the U.S. Senate and Energy Secretary Rick Perry. But later, when a reporter pushed him by saying he had the power to block the pipeline with sanctions, Trump replied:Germany has the power to block it. You know how they block it? By not buying it. I mean, Germany made a decision to buy a tremendous percentage of their energy from Russia. Germany – whether they should be doing that or not, they’re the ones that have the power to block it. They shouldn’t buy it. Or, if they want to, they can. But that’s really a decision of Germany.My reading of these remarks is that Trump is less interested in imposing sanctions than he is eager to get Germany to buy more of the U.S.’s “tremendous” LNG. “I think that’s really the way, if they want to spend a tremendous amount of money,” Trump said.Regardless of what happens with Nord Stream 2, Germany and other European countries are likely to buy more U.S. LNG because they don’t want to spend a tremendous amount of money — in particular, on Russian gas. Nord Stream 2 came up at the Trump press conference with Duda because Poland’s state-owned oil and gas company, PGNiG, is an enthusiastic buyer of U.S. LNG. Last year, the utility signed three long-term contracts with U.S. producers, only one of which — Cheniere Energy Inc. — is already supplying the fuel; the others still haven’t built their export terminals.PGNiG is signing these deals because it is locked into a long-term contract with Russia’s Gazprom and unhappy with the price it’s paying. The dispute is in arbitration, with the Polish utility close to winning a reduction. Even so, the contract runs out in 2022 and PGNiG is threatening not to renew it and seek alternatives from Norway. For those threats to be credible, and for Gazprom to start offering favorable terms, the buyer needs to show that it can already get supplies from elsewhere. It’s making some progress.PGNiG has long claimed it can source LNG at lower prices than those offered by Gazprom. This year, that claim doesn't look so outlandish. Gazprom’s average export price in Europe reached $254 per 1,000 cubic meters in the first quarter of 2019. Spot LNG prices have been lower, hovering about $5 per million British thermal units, or about $177 per 1,000 cubic meters.One may laugh at the U.S. branding of “freedom gas,” but its influence on European prices has been liberating. It is a buyer’s market, at least for now.Only three factors limit Europe’s ability to drive down natural gas prices: Gazprom’s long-term contracts; LNG terminal capacity; and demand in Asia, where prices are higher. The first two of these aren’t immutable: Contracts will run out and be renegotiated, and new terminals are being built (Germany alone has plans for two). That LNG supplies can easily be diverted elsewhere as prices change makes it necessary for European countries to have access to pipeline gas sources — but Gazprom isn’t the only one. It faces competition from Norway and various Mediterranean projects.Germany stands to benefit from this new setup. It needs a lot of gas as it tries to phase out both nuclear and coal power. Demand forecasts vary wildly, but it’s safe to assume the country will buy as much as it can get. Nord Stream2 alone won’t be enough to cover those needs, so Germany will have to turn to the U.S. That, together with supplies from other sources, should help it to negotiate down Gazprom’s prices.It’s a win-win situation for the U.S. LNG producers, Germany and even Gazprom as it seeks to keep a foothold in Europe. But two strong arguments still exist for sanctioning Nord Stream 2. One is the need to preserve the Ukrainian transit route for Russian gas. If it dries up, cash-strapped Ukraine would lose a major revenue source. (For now, though, Russia will pump as much gas as it can to Europe to avoid losing its main export market. Given Gazprom’s importance to the personal wealth of Putin’s close circle, that’s not an option.) The other reason is that Nord Stream 2 undermines Poland’s bargaining power over Gazprom: The supplier would be able to say it has found another buyer in the neighborhood.Trump and U.S. Congress should weigh these dangers against that of further alienating Germany. It might try to defy the sanctions if Gazprom goes ahead with the Nord Stream 2 project without Western partners. Any move by the U.S. against Nord Stream 2 would also confirm to its European allies that Washington’s sanctions policy is merely a tool to advance trade interests.These considerations make for a difficult decision. Trump’s remarks on Wednesday sounded to me as though he were leaning toward letting the market do its job this time. That doesn’t mean he can’t change his mind tomorrow — especially if his trade war with China ends and his attention switches to Europe.To contact the author of this story: Leonid Bershidsky at lbershidsky@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Edward Evans at eevans3@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Leonid Bershidsky is Bloomberg Opinion's Europe columnist. He was the founding editor of the Russian business daily Vedomosti and founded the opinion website Slon.ru.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oil & Gas Journallast month

    Russian gas exports to Hungary rise over 2018

    Natural gas supplies from Gazprom to Hungary from Jan. 1 through June 5 totaled 4.3 billion cu m, a 57.5% increase vs. the same period last year. In addition to the contracted amounts, Hungary bought from Gazprom another 2 billion cu m of gas, which will be delivered this year.

  • Moscow May Use ‘Nuclear Option’ In European Gas Race
    Oilprice.com2 months ago

    Moscow May Use ‘Nuclear Option’ In European Gas Race

    As the competition in European natural markets is rapidly increasing, Moscow may see itself forced to use more extreme measures to secure its market share

  • Rigzone.com2 months ago

    Gazprom Makes 17Tcf Gas Discovery

    Gazprom discovers two new fields containing over 17 trillion cubic feet of gas on the Yamal shelf.

  • Reuters2 months ago

    Gazprom chief says slight changes to Nord Stream 2 timings possible - Ifax

    Slight changes to the schedule of Russia's Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline project to Germany are possible, Alexey Miller, chief executive of Gazprom, the Russian state gas producer leading the project, was quoted as saying on Sunday. Delays in obtaining permits from Denmark could cause the launch of the project to be delayed from late 2019 to 2020, Interfax cited Nord Stream 2 AG, the project's operator, as saying on Friday. "Even if some situations occur, it's important to understand that they could affect the project's deadlines, but in a very, very insignificant way," Miller was cited by Interfax as saying in a television interview due to be aired later on Sunday.

  • Reuters2 months ago

    Russia's Gazprom considers Linde, Shell technologies for Baltic LNG

    Russian gas producer Gazprom is considering using technology made by industrial gases group Linde or Royal Dutch Shell at its Baltic LNG project, Gazprom board member Vitaly Markelov said on Tuesday. Russia ...

  • The European Gas Game Is About To Change
    Oilprice.com2 months ago

    The European Gas Game Is About To Change

    A consolidation phase in former Soviet Union nations could provide an opportunity for both Russia and European gas buyers are big contracts are about to be closed

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Fire breaks out on gas pipeline in Russia's Urals region

    A fire broke out on a major gas pipeline in the Urals region of Russia, Interfax news agency reported on Monday, citing an unnamed source in the emergency services. Gazprom, which operates the pipeline ...

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Record Russian gas sales to Europe help Gazprom profits double

    Russian gas producer Gazprom doubled its annual net profit last year, led by record sales to Europe despite pressure on EU states to diversify away from Russian energy imports. Gazprom is also working on contingency plans in case the undersea Nord Stream-2 gas pipeline to Germany is delayed and talks on a new gas transit deal with Ukraine fall through, a spokesman said after the company released its annual results on Monday. Gazprom is a lynchpin of Russia's commodity-dependent economy with its sales accounting for over 5 percent of the country's $1.6 trillion annual gross domestic product.

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Russia's Gazprom discusses gas deliveries to China with CNPC

    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian gas producer Gazprom has discussed gas deliveries to China with China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), Gazprom said in a statement on Thursday. The company also said it ...

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Foreign companies queue up to sue cash-strapped Turkmenistan

    A deal for Russia's Gazprom to resume buying gas from Turkmenistan came not a moment too soon for the Central Asian state because it is so short of foreign currency that a number of foreign companies have taken it to court over unpaid bills. Turkmenistan's economy had boomed until 2015, supported by high energy prices and gas exports, and the government awarded megaproject contracts for new factories and highways.

  • Exclusive: Arrival of Putin's judo partner squeezed Shell out of LNG project - sources
    Reuters3 months ago

    Exclusive: Arrival of Putin's judo partner squeezed Shell out of LNG project - sources

    LONDON/MOSCOW (Reuters) - Royal Dutch Shell pulled out of a project to build a Russian liquefied natural gas plant partly because Gazprom suddenly added another partner with links to an ally of President Vladimir Putin, according to five sources. After three years work on the Baltic Coast project, Shell discovered that Gazprom was bringing in a company linked to Arkady Rotenberg, who is on a U.S. sanctions blacklist. The sudden change in the line-up of partners was one of the key factors contributing to Shell's Wednesday announcement that it was pulling out of the project, according to three sources close to Shell and two other sources familiar with the project.

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Exclusive: Arrival of Putin's judo partner squeezed Shell out of LNG project: sources

    LONDON/MOSCOW (Reuters) - Royal Dutch Shell pulled out of a project to build a Russian liquefied natural gas plant partly because Gazprom suddenly added another partner with links to an ally of President Vladimir Putin, according to five sources. After three years work on the Baltic Coast project, Shell discovered that Gazprom was bringing in a company linked to Arkady Rotenberg, who is on a U.S. sanctions blacklist. The sudden change in the line-up of partners was one of the key factors contributing to Shell's Wednesday announcement that it was pulling out of the project, according to three sources close to Shell and two other sources familiar with the project.