OGZPY - Public Joint Stock Company Gazprom

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
5.58
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 10:16AM EDT. Market open.
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close5.58
Open5.61
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range5.58 - 5.63
52 Week Range3.94 - 8.50
Volume25,385
Avg. Volume495,679
Market Cap66.766B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.24
PE Ratio (TTM)1.66
EPS (TTM)3.35
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.44 (7.95%)
Ex-Dividend DateJul 15, 2020
1y Target EstN/A
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- U.S. President Donald Trump is furious at Germany for many reasons, not all of them fathomable. In phone conversations with Angela Merkel, he’s allegedly called the German chancellor “stupid” and denigrated her in “near-sadistic” tones. Though this be madness, as the Bard might say, there is — on rare occasions — method in it. One such case is Nord Stream 2.It is an almost-finished gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany, running right next to the original Nord Stream, which has been in operation since 2011. “We’re supposed to protect Germany from Russia, but Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for energy coming from a pipeline,” Trump roared at a recent campaign rally. “Excuse me, how does that work?”As is his wont, the president thereby conflated many things. One of his grievances is that Germany has long been scrimping on its military spending, in effect free-riding on U.S. protection, for which he wants to punish his “delinquent” ally. Another is that the European Union, which he considers Germany’s marionette, allegedly takes advantage of the U.S. in business. Trump also wants to sell Europe more American liquefied natural gas (LNG).But Trump isn’t the only American trying to stop Nord Stream 2. In December, Congress aimed sanctions at a Swiss company that supplied the ships to lower the pipes into the water. This delayed the pipeline’s launch. Then Russia sent another vessel to finish the job. So this week a bipartisan group of Senators moved to widen the sanctions in order to kill Nord Stream 2 altogether.The problem is that if this new round becomes law, it will amount to an all-out economic assault on Europe. It could hit individuals and companies from many countries that are only tangential to the project — by underwriting insurance for the pipeline, say, or providing port services to the ships involved.Considering this an instance of illegal American extraterritoriality, the German government now plans to make the EU retaliate against the U.S. Trump, in the heat of America’s “silly season” leading up to November, could then strike back with new tariffs on German cars or a full-blown trade war. The transatlantic alliance, which was already frayed, is close to tearing.To me, this situation increasingly resembles “chicken,” a classic in game theory. The question is whether both sides are merely feigning recklessness (as the game assumes) or are already too far gone. And that applies just as much to the Germans. They like to play the reasonable side in transatlantic fights but deserve just as much blame as Trump and Congress for causing this mess.If Russia were a normal country, the German rationale for this pipeline might make sense. Europe will need more gas, especially to replace much dirtier coal and to supplement renewable sources of energy on the way to becoming carbon-neutral. And to get that gas, it makes sense to diversify — between Norwegian imports, American LNG or any other sort, including the Russian stuff. And piping it into Europe along the shortest route — through the Baltic — is efficient.But Russia is far from a normal country. It has for years been waging hybrid warfare in Europe, ranging from disinformation campaigns to aggression in Ukraine. At Germany’s urging, Russia recently extended a contract with Kiev to keep piping gas through Ukraine for several more years. But in the longer term, the new pipeline gives Russia dangerous geopolitical and strategic options.With two pipelines through the Baltic and another big one through the Black Sea, Russia could in the future cut all central and eastern European countries out of billions in transit fees. The country already controls almost 40% of the EU’s gas market even without Nord Stream 2. Once that goes online, the rest of Europe may become too dependent and therefore vulnerable to blackmail. When Trump calls Germany “a captive to Russia,” he has half a point.This is why Poland and the Baltic republics of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia also oppose Nord Stream 2. As NATO’s eastern front line and former victims of invasion and aggression, they fear Russia more viscerally than Germans do nowadays. Psychologically, the Poles distrust any deal between Germany and Russia over their heads, because it reminds them of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939, which carved up their region between Nazi and Soviet spheres of influence.My question to the Germans, then, is why they have for years been deaf to these strategic concerns by their partners in NATO and the European Union, while coddling their own pro-Russian business lobbies and, of course, the Kremlin.German intransigence looks even more unsavory when considering who within Germany is most passionately in favor of the pipeline. Support for it skews sharply to the left, with its long tradition of anti-American and pro-Russian leanings. The most egregious example is Gerhard Schroeder, a Social Democrat who was Angela Merkel’s predecessor as chancellor. He’s always been buddies with Russian President Vladimir Putin. These days he also chairs the supervisory board of Nord Stream AG, which is owned by Gazprom PJSC and thus controlled by the Kremlin, as well as the board of Rosneft Oil Co PJSC, a Russian oil giant.This week, Schroeder testified to the Bundestag that Germany and Europe should prepare tough countermeasures against U.S. sanctions. He won support from The Left, a party that descends from the former regime in East Germany.Nord Stream 2 was and is a terrible idea. It’s a geopolitical project disguised as a private business deal. It has shown Germany to be an insensitive and naïve ally, and the U.S. to be a truculent one. It is now rending what little remains of their former relationship. If there is any way to leave these pipes buried and forgotten under the sea, all involved should discreetly and diplomatically search for it. Otherwise, this game of chicken will end the way it’s not supposed to.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andreas Kluth is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. He was previously editor in chief of Handelsblatt Global and a writer for the Economist. He's the author of "Hannibal and Me." For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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Rusal, the world’s biggest aluminum producer outside China and one of the city’s biggest employers.In response, the authorities should accelerate plans to extend a natural gas pipeline to the city, Rusal Chief Executive Officer Evgeny Nikitin wrote to the government in an April 30 letter seen by Bloomberg News.The national weather service says Krasnoyarsk had the dirtiest air of any Russian city in 2018, the latest data available. But Igor Shpeht, who set up a crowd-sourced network of meters placed on volunteers’ balconies, said air quality is much worse than the authorities let on.“Our air is ranked the worst in the world so often that we don’t even pay attention to the global Air Quality Index any more,” Shpeht said.‘Optimistic scenario’It may get worse. Even as Europe moves away from coal, Energy Minister Alexander Novak says Russia wants to boost production by over 50% by 2035 under its “optimistic scenario.” Coal provides the half of the region’s electricity and is used extensively to heat private houses. Although Russia is the world’s biggest natural gas exporter, much of Siberia isn’t connected to the national pipeline network for the cleaner-burning fuel.While Siberia gets half of its electricity from zero-emission hydroelectric stations, a dam 30 kilometers (19 miles) from Krasnoyarsk contributes to the pollution. The Yenisei river downstream never freezes, despite temperatures that average -16 degrees Celsius (3 degrees Farenheit) in January, creating steam that traps harmful particles and exacerbates the smog.Krasnoyarsk’s air quality caught the attention of federal authorities following a 2018 visit by Putin and last year’s fires in the Taiga, a vital carbon sink that absorbs carbon dioxide for the entire planet.New PipelineThe city is now part of a national clean air program that calls for expanding the use of natural gas. The plan calls for a 570-kilometer gas pipeline from the Kemerovo region that regional governor Alexander Uss estimates will cost 120 billion rubles ($1.7 billion).But the proposed pipeline wasn’t included in Gazprom PJSC’s 2020 investment program. Planned investments through 2025 are still under discussion, the state-run gas giant said last month.The Energy Ministry declined to comment on the gas pipeline to Krasnoyarsk, but said there is a plan approved by the government to improve the air in Krasnoyarsk by 2024 that includes modernizing the city’s heating systems and shutting down old boilers.The cost of bringing gas to Krasnoyarsk would be about three times what Russia spends on gasification annually, according to Sergei Kapitonov, an analyst at Moscow’s Skolkovo Energy Center.Regulated gas prices can be one-tenth what the average European consumer pays. That “creates a paradox where large regions of the country with the world’s biggest gas reserves don’t have access to gas and must use coal for heat and electricity generation instead,” Kapitonov said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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