• When To Buy Growth Stocks: Why The Double-Bottom Base Still Fuels Strong Breakouts
    Investor's Business Daily

    When To Buy Growth Stocks: Why The Double-Bottom Base Still Fuels Strong Breakouts

    Some folks on Wall Street and Main Street think certain patterns found in market behavior and growth stocks simply cannot last. Then the stock plunges by simply meeting or barely beating the consensus EPS forecast. Planet Fitness, an August 2015 IPO, proves this point with its strong price run in recent years.

  • This ICO Startup Didn’t Die During Crypto Winter. It Has DAI to Thank
    Coindesk

    This ICO Startup Didn’t Die During Crypto Winter. It Has DAI to Thank

    MakerDAO and Monolith are now collaborating to connect DeFi loans to a European Visa debit card. Ether fans can spend crypto with a Visa debit card because Monolith liquidates designated funds on the back-end, providing the merchant with fiat. Monolith CEO Mel Gelderman told CoinDesk he wants to promote an “ethereum lifestyle,” starting with the way he runs his London-based token startup.

  • Mark Cuban explains how to make a 16% guaranteed return
    MarketWatch

    Mark Cuban explains how to make a 16% guaranteed return

    As Mark Cuban, the “Shark Tank” star, billionaire entrepreneur, and NBA franchise owner explains, just pay off your debts. The personal finance site NerdWallet put our revolving credit card balance at $420.22 billion in late 2018. The revolving number is just the credit card debt we carry from month to month.

  • These 16 money wasters are why so many Americans can’t save for retirement
    MarketWatch

    These 16 money wasters are why so many Americans can’t save for retirement

    From the lofty perch of old age, and after a lifetime of thrift, I declare that I am qualified to comment on how not to waste money. We've all heard the reports: Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck, a large number can't come up with $400 for an emergency, and there's no money to save for retirement and other goals. Most of that data comes from surveys where people are, in effect, saying they don't have enough income.

  • I built a nest egg of $1 million and I’m only 46 — so why do I still spend my waking hours worrying?
    MarketWatch

    I built a nest egg of $1 million and I’m only 46 — so why do I still spend my waking hours worrying?

    We have over $1 million in investments for ourselves, an additional $50,000 in investments for our two girls to be used for college. We have made investing mistakes, but we have learned from them. All told, we currently have over $1 million in investments for ourselves, an additional $50,000 in investments (529s and a Scottrade custodial account) for our two girls to be used for college, with our only debt being the final few years of our mortgage.

  • JPMorgan to brief clients on volatility in equity markets
    Reuters

    JPMorgan to brief clients on volatility in equity markets

    JPMorgan Chase & Co plans to host a conference call for clients on Tuesday to address recent market moves, after last week's inversion of the U.S. Treasury yield curve and a sharp sell-off on global stock markets. "In the wake of a rather violent decline in yields, inversion of the curve, and volatility in equity markets, we consider the role of poor liquidity and systematic flows in exacerbating these market moves," an invitation from JPMorgan Cross-Asset & Derivatives Strategy said.

  • Senior rip-offs are soaring—and you won’t believe who the crooks are
    MarketWatch

    Senior rip-offs are soaring—and you won’t believe who the crooks are

    For financial scammers, that means 10,000 potential new victims every 24 hours. While anyone, anywhere, at anytime can be a victim of a financial scam—and below are some of the most common ones—seniors are particularly at risk. “Older Americans are more vulnerable for many reasons,” says Joe Snyder of the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that works with the financial industry, seniors groups and others to reduce rip-offs.

  • Copy insiders and buy these stocks — because they see no recession looming
    MarketWatch

    Copy insiders and buy these stocks — because they see no recession looming

    I recently told subscribers of my stock letter Brush Up on Stocks to get more bullish on stocks because of robust insider buying in cyclical sectors like tech, banks, industrials, chemicals, airlines, autos, hotels, energy, mining, and brokerage and investment companies. Insiders would definitely not be doing this if — like Gundlach — they saw a recession on the way. Instead, they'd be on a buyer's strike, or at best they'd favor utilities or consumer non-discretionary companies.

  • The $4 billion time bomb ticking away inside the biggest marijuana companies
    MarketWatch

    The $4 billion time bomb ticking away inside the biggest marijuana companies

    The 9,000-square-foot facility was only capable of growing about C$12 million ($9 million) worth of pot in a year, but that didn't seem to matter. Marijuana companies were surging in interest and market cap as Canada planned to legalize recreational pot sales, and companies that established at least one cultivation license were receiving beneficial treatment from Health Canada, which meant snagging the property and its accompanying license could lead to a legitimate growing business in more ways than one. RavenQuest BioMed Inc. (RVVQF)(CA:RQB) eventually “won” the bidding, agreeing to pay nearly C$30 million.

  • Why Junior Miners Will Be The Biggest Winners In The Coming Gold Boom
    Oilprice.com

    Why Junior Miners Will Be The Biggest Winners In The Coming Gold Boom

    Based on a series of recent events that includes the announcement of a formidable new CEO and a near-term production target of 50,000+ ounces of gold per year in one of the world's hottest precious metal venues, African Gold Group (TSX.V: AGG; OTC:AGGFF) could be on a few radars. And that's just the starting point: the company is evaluating the potential for an increase in estimated annual production to 100,000 ounces per year. Not only is AGG sitting on a potential 2.2-million-ounce mineral resource at its Kobada Gold Project in Mali's prolific gold-producing Birimian Greenstone Belt … but it's also just appointed a new CEO that will turn investor heads: Legendary mining financier Stan Bharti.

  • USA TODAY

    Recession watch: 6 financial moves to make when the economy slows down

    INCREASE YOUR EMERGENCY FUND If the economy does take a dip, it's a good idea to make sure you've socked away as much as you can for a rainy day. "I think the greatest fear when the economy slows down or goes into a recession is that income will be impacted, either hours cut back or worst case, (your) being laid off," says Kenneth Perine, a certified financial planner with Meritage Wealth Advisory in Livermore, California. "It's times like these that having an emergency fund in place really pays off.

  • Briggs & Stratton stock falls to 44-year low after surprise loss, dividend cut and plant closure
    MarketWatch

    Briggs & Stratton stock falls to 44-year low after surprise loss, dividend cut and plant closure

    Shares of Briggs & Stratton were rocked Thursday to levels last seen in the 1970s, after the maker of gasoline engines and outdoor power equipment reported a surprise fiscal fourth-quarter loss, lowered its full-year outlook and slashed its quarterly dividend. The company also said it will close its facility in Murray, Ky., which employs about 630 people, by the fall of 2020, as it consolidates production of its walk-behind lawn mower engines into its Poplar Bluff, Mo. facility. The company said it will offer the affected employees opportunities to relocate to the company's other plants, which are located in Alabama, Georgia, Missouri and New York.

  • The new math of saving for retirement may boil down to this one, absurdly simple rule
    MarketWatch

    The new math of saving for retirement may boil down to this one, absurdly simple rule

    There's research that can help — from institutions that don't have a conflict of interest because they don't invest or give advice. My favorite is the Employee Benefits Research Institute in Washington, D.C. EBRI, as it's called, gathered anonymous information on tens of millions of people and how they actually save. It won't tell people what to do, but from its research there's a pretty useful rule of thumb for young people: Count on your fingers and … Save 10% — now Between you and your employer, set aside at least 10% of your paycheck.

  • Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump
    MarketWatch

    Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump

    In the past, China has shown extraordinary restraint in response to U.S. tariffs and President Trump's critical tweets. Let us discuss your game plan if China retaliates, starting with the help of two charts. Please click here for an annotated chart S&P 500 ETF (SPY) Even though the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is the most popular index, for analysis purposes, investors ought to focus on S&P 500 because the most money is tied to the S&P 500 Index (SPX) of the largest U.S. companies.

  • Oilprice.com

    Saudi Arabia’s Newest Strategy To Send Oil Prices Higher

    The world's top crude oil exporter, Saudi Arabia, has been cutting for nearly two years its production and shipments as per OPEC's deal, in which, being the cartel's largest oil producer, it aims to lead by example. The Saudis have been keeping their exports subdued this year—below 7 million bpd in recent months—to prevent another large oil glut from weighing down on oil prices again. In its lowered export levels, however, Saudi Arabia has dramatically reshuffled the priority destinations of its crude oil exports, boosting sales in the world's top oil importer—China—and slashing shipments to the United States, vessel tracking data, Chinese customs data, and EIA estimates show.

  • Door-to-door thieves are using DNA tests to scam you
    USA TODAY

    Door-to-door thieves are using DNA tests to scam you

    She did hand over a Medicare card, which fortunately was a new card that did not have her Social Security number on it. Even so, her card still has important information that can be used by thieves. New tax tool: This offers a new way to estimate next year's tax refund Wrong Social Security estimates: What you need to know Hot new scam involves 'genetic testing' kits This summer, both the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued fraud alerts about crooks targeting Medicare beneficiaries.

  • China could unload US Treasuries — but here's why they (probably) won't
    Yahoo Finance

    China could unload US Treasuries — but here's why they (probably) won't

    Long term government bond yields have been transmitting a potentially recessionary signal that's shaken investor confidence and reverberated across worldwide markets. As investors fret over the weakening global economy, plunging bond yields may dissuade Beijing from potentially exercising what some fear could be a weapon in its trade dispute with the U.S.: Selling Treasuries (TNX). The historic lows in long-term interest rates, and the resulting inversion of the yield curve, suggests that China would be fighting what's currently the market's most powerful trend.

  • Here’s what smart rich people really do with their nest egg
    MarketWatch

    Here’s what smart rich people really do with their nest egg

    Most people think they're above average in intelligence, relationship status and professional achievement. Social scientists call this “illusory superiority.” My business partner Scott Puritz, has found the one area where even above-average people, objectively smart, rich, successful professionals, seem to wave the white flag and admit to not understanding — money and investing. “One of the most shocking things is the low-level financial literacy throughout our culture,” Puritz told the Washington Post.

  • Baidu Reports Earnings With Stock Holding a Value Level
    Investopedia

    Baidu Reports Earnings With Stock Holding a Value Level

    Baidu shares closed last week at $96.70, down 39% year to date and in bear market territory at 58.8% below the 52-week high of $234.88 set on Sept. 21, 2018. On May 16, Baidu missed earnings estimates for the first time since it became a publicly traded company in 2005. Baidu is losing market share to NetEase, Inc. (NTES) in the gaming space.

  • Barrons.com

    The No. 1 Job in America with the ‘Best Career Opportunities’ Pays $112,000 a Year — and It’s Not in Tech

    As unemployment hovers a 49-year low, there are more professions to choose from that will give people the one thing that gets them out of bed in the morning: a meaningful job with the possibility of advancement. Access to career momentum opportunities in the workplace is one of the strongest predictors of employee satisfaction based on millions of reviews left on Glassdoor, in addition to culture and values and quality senior leadership, according to a study released Wednesday by the company. The report used the following criteria: a median base salary over the past year of $80,000 a year or higher, well above the June 2019 U.S. median annual pay of $53,411, and at least 2,000 job openings as of July 5 on Glassdoor.

  • Wall Street’s latest billion-dollar pot company had a half-ton of bad weed returned as it was going public
    MarketWatch

    Wall Street’s latest billion-dollar pot company had a half-ton of bad weed returned as it was going public

    The newest cannabis company on Wall Street, Sundial Growers Inc., sold a half ton of pot that was returned by corporate buyer Zenabis Global Inc. because it contained visible mold, parts of rubber gloves and other non-cannabis material, according to people familiar with the matter. The attempted sale would be the equivalent of 10% of Sundial's (SNDL) total second-quarter cannabis sales of five metric tons. In its own June-quarter report the same morning, Canadian cannabis company Zenabis Global (CA:ZENA) disclosed that it had returned a half ton of pot and terminated its agreement to buy weed from a “third party” that it did not name.

  • Barrons.com

    Wall Street Has Abandoned Oil and Gas Stocks. You Shouldn’t.

    Given long-term demand uncertainties facing the industry, energy companies of all sizes should be paying out dividends that are at least as good as the nearly 2% yield on the S&P 500, he says. Still, it is hard to find big fans of energy stocks, even among investors focused on the sector. That's understandable, given that energy is by far the worst-performing group in the S&P 500 over the past decade, with an annualized return of 4.4%, against 14% for the index.

  • Hedge Fund Legend Jim Simons Pours Money Into Aurora Cannabis (ACB) and Aphria (APHA) Stocks
    TipRanks

    Hedge Fund Legend Jim Simons Pours Money Into Aurora Cannabis (ACB) and Aphria (APHA) Stocks

    In the last two quarters, billionaire, hedge fund manager, and mathematical genius Jim Simons has moved decisively into the cannabis sector, taking large positions in both Aurora Cannabis (ACB) and Aphria (APHA). Simons, known for his work in higher mathematics and military cryptography, founded the Renaissance Technologies hedge fund in 1982. The firm was a pioneer in quantitative trading, the application of higher mathematics to the financial markets, and has developed a reputation as one of the best returning hedge funds in the business.

  • Kevin O’Leary: This easy math trick helps you crush retirement goals
    MarketWatch

    Kevin O’Leary: This easy math trick helps you crush retirement goals

    “Shark Tank” star Kevin O'Leary has some simple advice for anyone who finds investing scary: Just do it. Ten percent might not sound like a lot, but the reason O'Leary is right is the mathematical fact of compounding interest. If you save, say, $5,000 in one year, a typical stock market return in a diversified, low-cost index fund means that a year later you will have $5,365.

  • 9 ways California’s new retirement plan changes the retirement savings landscape
    MarketWatch

    9 ways California’s new retirement plan changes the retirement savings landscape

    On July 1, private sector employers in California gained access to an innovative new program that enables them to facilitate retirement savings for their employees. In a state where half of all private sector workers do not have a retirement savings account or participate in a pension, CalSavers stands to make a significant difference in the lives of everyday workers. Workers are automatically enrolled in individual retirement accounts (IRAs) with a default savings rate of 5% of their paychecks.