ZTCOF - ZTE Corporation

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
1.78
+0.01 (+0.85%)
At close: 3:08PM EDT
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Previous Close1.76
Open1.75
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range1.75 - 1.79
52 Week Range1.21 - 4.18
Volume14,930
Avg. Volume81,540
Market Cap9.381B
Beta1.84
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.08
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend Date2016-06-06
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Reuters2 days ago

    U.S. senators seek punishment if China's ZTE violates deal

    Republican and Democratic U.S. senators introduced a bill on Tuesday that would reimpose sanctions on China's ZTE Corp if it does not fully comply with U.S. laws and an agreement with the Trump administration that ended stiff restrictions on the telecommunications equipment company. President Donald Trump angered many members of Congress, including some of his fellow Republicans, in July when he decided to lift a ban on U.S. companies selling to ZTE, allowing the giant company to resume business. Lawmakers have introduced several pieces of legislation since then that seek to clamp down on the company, China's second largest telecommunications equipment maker.

  • U.S. senators seek punishment if China's ZTE violates deal
    Reuters2 days ago

    U.S. senators seek punishment if China's ZTE violates deal

    Republican and Democratic U.S. senators introduced a bill on Tuesday that would reimpose sanctions on China's ZTE Corp if it does not fully comply with U.S. laws and an agreement with the Trump administration that ended stiff restrictions on the telecommunications equipment company. President Donald Trump angered many members of Congress, including some of his fellow Republicans, in July when he decided to lift a ban on U.S. companies selling to ZTE, allowing the giant company to resume business. Lawmakers have introduced several pieces of legislation since then that seek to clamp down on the company, China's second largest telecommunications equipment maker.

  • The Trade War Is On: How We Got Here and What's Next
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    The Trade War Is On: How We Got Here and What's Next

    The trade dispute between the U.S. and China continues. Chinese officials have announced retaliation following U.S. President Donald Trump’s authorization of a new round of tariffs on an additional $200 billion of Chinese goods, a move that brought the total amount targeted by the U.S. in recent months to $250 billion. China announces retaliation on $60 billion of U.S. goods to become effective simultaneously with the U.S. duties.

  • The Wall Street Journal8 days ago

    [$$] Australia’s Actions Against Chinese Firms Ignite 5G Security Debate

    Australia’s move last month to bar Chinese telecommunications-equipment manufacturers from the country’s 5G rollout over fears of cyberspying triggered debate over the security risks of the technology. Officials in Canberra, the Australian capital, cited national-security concerns as they ruled out bids from companies that they said could be used as agents for foreign governments—language that effectively banned Huawei Technologies Co., the world’s largest maker of telecommunications equipment, and its chief Chinese rival, ZTE Corp. Canberra’s reasoning was based on the belief that 5G networks will be more vulnerable to security breaches because they will be less centralized than current networks, with more sensitive network activity occurring in a multitude of locations closer to users.

  • The Wall Street Journal21 days ago

    [$$] Cyber Daily: Scrutinizing the Cyber Spend

    Malcolm Harkins, chief security and trust officer at Cylance Inc., says artificial intelligence will play a crucial role in the cybersecurity industry, which has a notorious talent shortage. Mr. Harkins described how advances in AI will improve security and why CISOs should have a role in lowering corporate costs. Q: What are some promising ways companies might soon apply AI to cybersecurity?

  • The Wall Street Journal21 days ago

    [$$] Japan Scrutinizes China’s Huawei, ZTE Over Spying Fears

    TOKYO—Japan is studying restrictions on Chinese telecommunications-equipment companies Huawei Technologies Co. and ZTE Corp. as U.S. fears of cyberspying by Beijing prod allies to follow suit. U.S. officials have been arguing that using equipment from the two companies in network infrastructure constitutes a security risk. Australia last week banned both Chinese companies from its next-generation mobile network.

  • The Wall Street Journal21 days ago

    [$$] China’s ZTE Reports $1.1 Billion Loss

    HONG KONG—China’s ZTE Corp. disclosed a loss of 7.8 billion yuan—about $1.1 billion—during the first half of the year, after a ban on purchasing American supplies forced a life-threatening shutdown of the telecommunications giant. The loss covers most of the period during which ZTE was shuttered, and marks its first official accounting of the period. The Commerce Department banned U.S. companies from selling to ZTE in April after it found the firm broke the terms of its settlement resolving earlier violations of U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea.

  • China's ZTE sees third-quarter profit after first-half loss on U.S. supplier ban
    Reuters22 days ago

    China's ZTE sees third-quarter profit after first-half loss on U.S. supplier ban

    China's ZTE Corp said it expects to make a profit in the third quarter after recording its worst-ever first-half net loss on Thursday, the result of a U.S. supplier ban that forced the telecoms gear maker to halt operations for three months. ZTE, the world's fourth-largest telecommunications equipment maker by market share, was crippled in April when the United States imposed the seven-year ban, saying ZTE broke an agreement to discipline executives who conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The company expects to post a net profit of between 24.2 million yuan ($3.54 million) and 1.0 billion yuan ($146.40 million) in the three months to September 30, it said in a filing to the Shenzhen stock exchange.

  • China's ZTE sees third-quarter profit after first-half loss on U.S. supplier ban
    Reuters22 days ago

    China's ZTE sees third-quarter profit after first-half loss on U.S. supplier ban

    China's ZTE Corp said it expects to make a profit in the third quarter after recording its worst-ever first-half net loss on Thursday, the result of a U.S. supplier ban that forced the telecoms gear maker to halt operations for three months. ZTE, the world's fourth-largest telecommunications equipment maker by market share, was crippled in April when the United States imposed the seven-year ban, saying ZTE broke an agreement to discipline executives who conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The company expects to post a net profit of between 24.2 million yuan ($3.54 million) and 1.0 billion yuan ($146.40 million) in the three months to September 30, it said in a filing to the Shenzhen stock exchange.

  • New executives at China's ZTE say production back to normal
    Reuters23 days ago

    New executives at China's ZTE say production back to normal

    Production at China's ZTE Corp is back to normal after the lifting of a U.S. ban and its carrier network business will return to a standard growth track in 2019, according to the firm's newly elected chairman and chief executive. China's No. 2 telecommunications equipment maker was crippled in April when the United States banned American firms from selling it parts, saying the company broke an agreement to discipline executives who had conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The ban, which became a source of friction in Sino-U.S. trade talks, was lifted in July after ZTE paid $1.4 billion in penalties, allowing the firm to resume business.

  • New executives at China's ZTE say production back to normal
    Reuters23 days ago

    New executives at China's ZTE say production back to normal

    Production at China's ZTE Corp is back to normal after the lifting of a U.S. ban and its carrier network business will return to a standard growth track in 2019, according to the firm's newly elected chairman and chief executive. China's No. 2 telecommunications equipment maker was crippled in April when the United States banned American firms from selling it parts, saying the company broke an agreement to discipline executives who had conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The ban, which became a source of friction in Sino-U.S. trade talks, was lifted in July after ZTE paid $1.4 billion in penalties, allowing the firm to resume business.

  • Reuters27 days ago

    U.S. Commerce's Ross picks ZTE monitor after rejecting 'Never Trump' lawyer

    A new monitor for ZTE is required as part of a June settlement that ended a ban on U.S. companies selling components to China's No. 2 telecommunications equipment maker. The ban threatened ZTE's survival and became a source of friction in trade talks between Washington and Beijing. Roscoe Howard, a former U.S. Attorney in Washington, will lead a compliance team designed to help ensure that ZTE does not illegally sell products with American parts to Iran and other sanctioned countries.

  • Exclusive: U.S. Commerce's Ross picks ZTE monitor after rejecting 'Never Trump' lawyer
    Reuters27 days ago

    Exclusive: U.S. Commerce's Ross picks ZTE monitor after rejecting 'Never Trump' lawyer

    A new monitor for ZTE is required as part of a June settlement that ended a ban on U.S. companies selling components to China's No. 2 telecommunications equipment maker. The ban threatened ZTE's survival and became a source of friction in trade talks between Washington and Beijing. Roscoe Howard, a former U.S. Attorney in Washington, will lead a compliance team designed to help ensure that ZTE does not illegally sell products with American parts to Iran and other sanctioned countries.

  • Ericsson, Samsung gain share in network gear as ZTE slumps
    Reuters29 days ago

    Ericsson, Samsung gain share in network gear as ZTE slumps

    LONDON/STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Ericsson increased its share of the mobile networks market in the second quarter, while Samsung Electronics jumped into fourth place, data from industry research firm Dell'Oro showed. Ericsson, the second biggest maker of radio access network (RAN) gear, and Samsung benefited from rising U.S. demand as China's ZTE tumbled into fifth place after it was hit by U.S. sanctions in April. The world's biggest network gear vendors - No.1-ranked Huawei Ericsson and third ranked Nokia - all increased their market share quarter on quarter, partly because ZTE's sales plummeted from April onward, Dell'Oro analyst Stefan Pongratz said via email.

  • Reuters29 days ago

    Ericsson, Samsung gain share in network gear as ZTE slumps

    LONDON/STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Ericsson increased its share of the mobile networks market in the second quarter, while Samsung Electronics jumped into fourth place, data from industry research firm Dell'Oro showed. Ericsson, the second biggest maker of radio access network (RAN) gear, and Samsung benefited from rising U.S. demand as China's ZTE tumbled into fifth place after it was hit by U.S. sanctions in April. The world's biggest network gear vendors - No.1-ranked Huawei [HWT.UL], Ericsson and third ranked Nokia - all increased their market share quarter on quarter, partly because ZTE's sales plummeted from April onward, Dell'Oro analyst Stefan Pongratz said via email.

  • Bloomberg29 days ago

    Is 5G More Vulnerable to Hackers Than 4G? Australia Thinks So

    "This new architecture provides a way to circumvent traditional security controls by exploiting equipment in the edge of the network – exploitation which may affect overall network integrity and availability, as well as the confidentiality of customer data," according to the statement. The Chinese equipment makers have also come under fire in the U.S., where regulators have proposed banning telecom companies from using federal subsidies to buy from companies like Huawei and ZTE that they say pose a national security risk.

  • Is 5G More Vulnerable to Hackers Than 4G? Australia Thinks So
    Bloomberg29 days ago

    Is 5G More Vulnerable to Hackers Than 4G? Australia Thinks So

    "This new architecture provides a way to circumvent traditional security controls by exploiting equipment in the edge of the network – exploitation which may affect overall network integrity and availability, as well as the confidentiality of customer data," according to the statement. The Chinese equipment makers have also come under fire in the U.S., where regulators have proposed banning telecom companies from using federal subsidies to buy from companies like Huawei and ZTE that they say pose a national security risk.

  • The Wall Street Journal29 days ago

    [$$] Huawei Says Australia Bans It, ZTE From New 5G Network

    The Australian government said Thursday that companies that are “likely to be subject to extrajudicial directions from a foreign government that conflict with Australian law” wouldn’t be able to guarantee security of the network. The statement didn’t specifically mention Chinese companies, but Huawei said it had been informed that both it and ZTE had been banned from the rollout. Australia’s intelligence agencies had been pushing for Huawei to be blocked from the network, though recently there had been speculation that a compromise might be reached.

  • Reuterslast month

    Trump signs defense policy bill with watered-down China measures

    U.S. President Donald Trump signed a $716 billion defense policy bill on Monday that authorizes military spending and includes watered-down controls on U.S. government contracts with China's ZTE Corp and Huawei Technologies Co Ltd. Trump signed the law at the U.S. Army's Fort Drum base in upstate New York on his way back to Washington after a 12-day working vacation at his golf club in New Jersey. The bill was named for one of Trump's political critics, the ailing U.S. Senator John McCain of Arizona, but he did not mention McCain's name.

  • U.S. Democratic candidates told not to use ZTE, Huawei devices - source
    Reuters2 months ago

    U.S. Democratic candidates told not to use ZTE, Huawei devices - source

    The Democratic National Committee warned party candidates running in November elections not to use devices made by Chinese telecommunications companies ZTE Corp and Huawei Technologies because they pose a security risk, a Democratic source said on Friday. U.S. lawmakers and the Trump administration have pressured U.S. companies to not sell Huawei or ZTE products, saying they potentially could be used to spy on Americans. The source said Bob Lord, the DNC's chief security officer, said in a email that it was important for party and campaign workers to be vigilant about the warnings.

  • Democratic candidates told not to use ZTE, Huawei devices: source
    Reuters2 months ago

    Democratic candidates told not to use ZTE, Huawei devices: source

    The Democratic National Committee warned party candidates running in November elections not to use devices made by Chinese telecommunications companies ZTE Corp and Huawei Technologies because they pose a security risk, a Democratic source said on Friday. U.S. lawmakers and the Trump administration have pressured U.S. companies to not sell Huawei or ZTE products, saying they potentially could be used to spy on Americans. The source said Bob Lord, the DNC's chief security officer, said in a email that it was important for party and campaign workers to be vigilant about the warnings.

  • Why Shares of Acacia Communications Have Jumped Today
    Motley Fool2 months ago

    Why Shares of Acacia Communications Have Jumped Today

    After temporarily losing a major customer in April, Acacia sees better days ahead.

  • The Wall Street Journal2 months ago

    [$$] Congress Passes Defense Bill That’s Tough on China

    Congress passed a defense-policy bill that some lawmakers say is tougher on China than any in history, as a bipartisan movement to confront Beijing gathers steam. The measure, an annual policy bill that authorizes $716 billion in total defense spending for the coming fiscal year, seeks to counter a range of Chinese government policies, including increased military activity in the South China Sea, the pursuit of cutting-edge U.S. technology and the spread of Communist Party propaganda at American institutions. The Senate on Wednesday approved the legislation in an 87-to-10 vote, after the House of Representatives approved it last week, and President Trump is expected to sign the bill into law.