AAPL - Apple Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
202.64
-9.82 (-4.62%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

206.21 +3.57 (1.76%)
Pre-Market: 5:09AM EDT

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Previous Close212.46
Open209.43
Bid205.72 x 1000
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's Range201.84 - 212.05
52 Week Range142.00 - 233.47
Volume46,882,843
Avg. Volume26,427,811
Market Cap915.767B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.08
PE Ratio (TTM)17.21
EPS (TTM)11.78
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019 - Nov 4, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.08 (1.45%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-09
1y Target Est223.21
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Loup's Munster Sees Low Probability of Direct Tariffs on Apple Products
    Bloomberg

    Loup's Munster Sees Low Probability of Direct Tariffs on Apple Products

    Aug.23 -- Gene Munster, Loup Ventures managing partner, and Bloomberg's Ian King discuss the impact of the escalating China-U.S. trade war on the tech industry. They speak with Bloomberg's Emily Chang on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Big Tech and banks are vying for the same consumer
    Yahoo Finance

    Big Tech and banks are vying for the same consumer

    From posting on social media to calling an Uber, mobile devices are becoming the command center for guiding day-to-day activities. Financial institutions want to get in on the action as well according to an industry insider.

  • Apple’s $44 Billion Drop Shows Growing Cost of Reliance on China
    Bloomberg

    Apple’s $44 Billion Drop Shows Growing Cost of Reliance on China

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Apple Inc.’s reliance on China is looking increasingly like its biggest handicap.The world’s most influential consumer electronics company shed $44 billion of market value Friday after a pair of pronouncements from Beijing and Washington cast a spotlight on its massive Chinese production base, from which almost all of the world’s iPhones are made.U.S. President Donald Trump this weekend “ordered” American companies to immediately start looking for alternatives to manufacturing in China, which is something Apple is thoroughly unprepared for, according to analyst Daniel Ives of Wedbush Securities Inc.“In a best case scenario,” says Ives, Apple “would be able to move away 5%-7% of iPhone production out of China” over the course of 18 months. The company would require three years to move 20% out, he adds, which is still less than the 25% of iPhone production that Apple needs for its domestic U.S. market. American tariffs on goods from China would therefore directly impact Apple’s biggest moneymaker.Ives calls Trump’s latest comments on China “a gut punch to Cupertino” in the title of his report.Apple’s main assembly partner, Foxconn Technology Group, has claimed that it has the capacity to build all of the Cupertino company’s U.S.-bound iPhones outside of China, however all indications are that to deploy it would require a great deal of time and money. Apple’s stock price took two big hits on Friday in the wake of the latest tariffs announcements.The president’s comments were followed hours later by tweets declaring that the U.S. would increase the rate of existing and impending tariffs on Chinese goods. Trump’s moves were in response to an earlier announcement that China was planning to impose tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. imports.People familiar with iPhone production have said that it is nearly impossible to relocate manufacturing of Apple’s iconic device in a wholesale manner due to the difficulty of procuring a skilled labor force elsewhere, a point that Apple CEO Tim Cook has hammered away at in public as well. The challenges of replicating the complex production lines and necessary infrastructure are also major hurdles.There may also be less purely economic reasons for sticking with the world’s No. 2 economy. Apple and its army of contract manufacturers, led by Foxconn, are collectively China’s largest private employer, providing work for millions of people. A reduced Apple presence could have significant implications for the local job market and rub Beijing the wrong way at a time Chinese officials see a slowing economy as a significant risk to stability. The government has shown a penchant for clamping down on foreign firms that displease it.And Apple needs to fend off smartphone market leader Huawei Technologies Co. and win back consumers in China, its largest market after the U.S.What Bloomberg Intelligence SaysApple could see an added 71 bps of gross-margin pressure if President Donald Trump follows through on his threat to boost expected tariffs on U.S. imports from China as the countries’ trade war escalates.\-- Analysts John Butler and Boyoung KimClick here for the researchRead more: China’s Online Army Shows Foreign Brands Who’s in ChargeWhile Apple has asked at least some suppliers for proposals on ex-China production, there’s no sign the Cupertino company is preparing for a large-scale migration.In one case, an assembler proposed a location outside of China, but Apple rejected it and the supplier ended up expanding in China. The recent effort by GoerTek to shift some of its AirPods production to Vietnam was done of its own volition, people familiar with the decision said. But neither of those relates to the iPhone, which remains chiefly made in China, with some assembly of older models happening in India and focused on the domestic market there.Cook’s ability to lobby Washington for tariff relief will be tested over the coming weeks. He has so far been able to obtain a temporary reprieve for iPhones, iPads and Apple laptops, which won’t be subject to U.S. tariffs until Dec. 15. But going forward, unless an unlikely rapid resolution to the trade war is reached, Apple looks like it will have to draw up comprehensive plans for building iPhones outside of China, however costly that may be.(A previous version of the story was corrected to reflect the Wedbush analyst’s proper name.)(Updates with Chinese market context from the 8th paragraph)\--With assistance from Edwin Chan.To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Vlad Savov, Peter ElstromFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow Jones Futures Volatile: China Trade War Trumps Stock Market Rally, Fed Rate Cuts
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures Volatile: China Trade War Trumps Stock Market Rally, Fed Rate Cuts

    Futures fall: The stock market rally and Fed rate cuts are no match for President Trump's escalating China trade war. Watch Apple, Boeing, Tesla, Micron and Nike.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Trump's Latest Trade War Tirade Should Worry Investors, Pt. 1

    Hiking tariffs and ordering American companies to abandon China will drive volatility Continue reading...

  • 3 Major Casualties of China’s New Tariffs
    TipRanks

    3 Major Casualties of China’s New Tariffs

    The US-China trade tensions have taken a turn for the worse in recent days. On Friday, China announced new tariffs on $75 billion worth of imported American goods, and a resumption of the 5% tariff on automotive parts. The new tariffs, to set between 5% and 10% and come into effect in steps on September 1 and December 15, include levies on electronics and machinery. President Trump responded in his customary fashion, by Tweet, saying in part, “Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing your companies HOME and making your products in the USA.” He added that the trade situation represents an opportunity for the US.Investors don’t seem to agree. Markets reacted to China’s and Trump’s announcements by plunging. Both the S&P 500 and Dow Jones averages fell 2.4% in Friday’s trading, and the tech-heavy NASDAQ slipped 3%. The losses were widespread, and not confined to any one sector of the market. Major companies with large exposure to the China trade were especially hard-hit. Here we take a look at three of those casualties. Apple, Inc. (AAPL)The world’s second largest publicly traded company lost 4.62% in the Friday market rout, falling over $9.80 per share. That Apple would prove particularly sensitive to shifts in the ‘trade war’ is no surprise; the Chinese market is Apple’s second largest, accounting for more than 18% of the company’s total revenues. The tit-for-tat tariff actions taken by the US and China have threatened the trade in electronics – and Apple’s supply chain. In response, the company is considering a drastic measure: the shift of 15% to 30% of its production from China to other areas of Southeast Asia. That Apple would consider such a drastic move underlines the risks of the trade war for the high-tech sector.Pointing out that nearly all of Apple’s flagship product line, the iPhone, is assembled in China, 4-star analyst Daniel Ives, from Wedbush, described Friday’s trade-war ramp-up as “a gut punch to Cupertino.” Even with that, however, Ives still sees Apple as a stock worth buying, and his $245 price target on AAPL shares suggest an upside of 20%.Despite the beating it took on Friday, AAPL retains its Moderate Buy rating from the analyst consensus. The stock has received 16 buys, 10 holds, and 1 sell in the past three months, with 6 of those buy ratings coming in just the last three weeks. Apple stock is trading for $202, and the average price target o $226 gives it an 11% upside potential. Caterpillar, Inc. (CAT)Caterpillar was hurting before this latest iteration of the trade conflict. The company is a major manufacturer and supplier of heavy construction and excavation equipment, with customers around the world. The general slowdown in the global economy has been eating into Cat’s sales, including in China, and the escalation in the tariff fight has made a difficult situation worse.The deterioration of Caterpillar’s position is made clear by the company’s losses in Friday’s trading: CAT stock fell 3.25%. The Friday losses come after CAT slipped more than 12% in August, following a 10.25% EPS reported for the second quarter.Cat hasn’t got an easy way out of its difficulties, either. According to 4-star analyst Jerry Revich, of Goldman Sachs, the construction industry is seeing rising inventories of trucks and construction machines; he predicts that there will have to be production cuts on the manufacturing end next year. In line with that, he gives CAT a Hold rating and a $130 price target.Stephens analyst Ashish Gupta agrees, saying, “For Caterpillar, excess dealer inventory means lower reported sales in coming quarters.” He goes on to add that, “The U.S. China trade war and Chinese impact on global commodity markets are reasons to avoid the stock right now. China accounts for a huge portion of global metals and energy consumption. A slowing Chinese economy has large ripple effects for the entire resource industry—a key consumer of Caterpillar products.” Ashish rates CAT as a Sell, with a low $100 price target.CAT is the lowest rated of the stocks in this list, with a Hold from the analyst consensus. The consensus rating is based on 7 buys, 5 holds, and 4 sells set in the past three months. The stocks’ share price of $114 and average price target of $136 still give it an upside potential of 19%. Deere & Company (DE)Like Caterpillar, Deere is a major manufacturer of heavy machinery; in this case, farm and agricultural equipment. And also like Caterpillar, Deere has been suffering as worldwide economic conditions have slowed down. And in a final similarity, Deere reported disappointing EPS in its most recent quarter, missing the forecast by 3.32%.China’s largest import from the US is agricultural products, especially soybeans. As the Chinese government cracks down on trade, with retaliatory measures, US farmers are watching their prospects for a profitable year go up in smoke. And that leads them to cut back on sales and maintenance of their heavy equipment, dealing a double punch to Deere in its domestic market. At the same time, the company is facing direct headwinds from the new Chinese tariffs. Deere stock lost 5.37% in Friday's market retreat. Rising factory production costs and bad weather, which would have been news stories in a normal year, have simply dealt additional blows to an already vulnerable company.At the same time, even with this perfect storm working against it, DE shares are getting upbeat reviews from Wall Street’s analysts. Writing from Credit Suisse, 4-star analyst Jamie Cook says of the quarterly report, “…expectations were sufficiently low heading into the print reflecting macro/trade war uncertainty, commodity prices and unfavorable weather which delayed planting,” and reiterates his belief that the company will beat the headwinds in the long run. He raises his price target on Deere to $197 (up 12%), suggesting an upside of 34%.From BMO Capital, Joel Tiss acknowledges slowing North American sales and a flat early-order program, but points out, “…the overall sales value was higher because of better take rates of innovative technologies and bigger machines.” Like Cook, Tiss gives Deere a Buy rating. His $175 implies a 19% upside potential.Deere is another stock with a Moderate Buy from the analyst consensus, this one based on 9 buys and 4 holds. The stock is selling for $147, has a $167 average price target, and an upside potential of 14%.Visit TipRanks’ Analysts’ Top Stocks tool, and find out which stocks are trending now Wall Street’s top market watchers.Disclosure: This author is long on AAPL.

  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    FT subscribers can  click here  to receive FirstFT every day by email. The White House has insisted Donald Trump remains committed to the trade war with Beijing after the US president admitted that raising ...

  • Apple’s titanium credit card comes with surprisingly strict care instructions
    MarketWatch

    Apple’s titanium credit card comes with surprisingly strict care instructions

    Most people don’t care if their credit card gets a scratch or a scuff, as long as they can still buy things with it. But the sleek new titanium Apple Card may change that.

  • Apple Stock: Trading Lower after a Volatile Week
    Market Realist

    Apple Stock: Trading Lower after a Volatile Week

    Apple (AAPL) investors have had a roller coaster week. Apple stock has lost just under 2% in a week, ending on August 23, 2019.

  • Video Streaming: Netflix Faces Fierce Competition
    Market Realist

    Video Streaming: Netflix Faces Fierce Competition

    Competition taking a toll on Netflix as its share of US subscription video streaming market keep falling as rivals gain ground.

  • News cycle is daily reminder of Big Tech’s antitrust vulnerabilities
    MarketWatch

    News cycle is daily reminder of Big Tech’s antitrust vulnerabilities

    Each of the four Big Tech companies under investigation, to varying degrees, faces exposure to antitrust charges. Their vulnerabilities reflect their marketing strengths, from Apple Inc.’s money-minting App Store to Facebook Inc.’s vice-like grip on social media through its acquisition of WhatsApp.

  • Barrons.com

    No Matter What Trump Says, Apple Will Never Get Out of China

    Apple stock fell 4.6% on Friday, a decline almost twice that of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which fell 2.4% in the week’s final session.

  • Barrons.com

    The Biggest U.S. Public Pension Bought Up Coca-Cola and McDonald’s Stock, and Sold Apple

    California Public Employees’ Retirement System, which managed $380 billion in assets as of Friday, made some big changes in its domestic stock portfolio in the second quarter. Calpers, as the pension is known, bulked up on (KO) (ticker: KO), (PEP) (PEP), and (MCD) stock (MCD) in the second quarter. Calpers made the disclosures in a form it filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Dow Jones Dips After Trump Hikes China Tariffs; Apple, AMD, Nike Edge Lower
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Dips After Trump Hikes China Tariffs; Apple, AMD, Nike Edge Lower

    President Trump raised China tariffs late Friday, as the China trade war spirals. The Dow Jones dipped after plunging in Friday's session. So did Apple, AMD, Tesla and Nike.

  • Trade War: Why Apple Stock Sank as China Fought Back
    Market Realist

    Trade War: Why Apple Stock Sank as China Fought Back

    Apple stock fell 4.6% as the US-China trade war intensified today. China warned of tariffs on more US goods, followed by Trump's tweeted response.

  • Barrons.com

    Roku Is a Cord Cutter’s Dream. It’s Working for Investors, Too

    Traditional pay-TV services are shedding subscribers because video streaming is more convenient, offers more choice, and, at least for now, a better value. As Netflix (ticker: NFLX), Apple (AAPL), (DIS) (DIS), (CMCSA)(CMCSA), and other heavyweights battle it out, the best way to play streaming is turning out to be upstart (ROKU) (ROKU). The company’s combination of hardware and software enables consumers to watch content streamed over the internet.

  • GuruFocus.com

    US Market Indexes Lower Friday and for the Aug. 23 Week

    Indexes report 4th consecutive week of losses Continue reading...

  • US Stock Market Tumbles on China Tariffs, Trump Tweets
    Market Realist

    US Stock Market Tumbles on China Tariffs, Trump Tweets

    In response to new tariffs from China and President Trump's tweets, the market tanked to session lows on Friday. The DJIA nosedived more than 600 points.

  • Amid Bay Area exodus, high-growth companies are courted by Texas, Idaho, others
    American City Business Journals

    Amid Bay Area exodus, high-growth companies are courted by Texas, Idaho, others

    There was a time when the Bay Area felt it had a lock on tech talent. Now some of the Bay Area’s most promising companies are finding themselves heavily courted by cities and states eager to lure the high-paying jobs and growth aura that these companies can bring with them. The huge incentive package spurred speculation that the company could one day move its headquarters to the Texas city, which Uber denied.

  • Apple, Silicon Valley chip stocks hammered after Trump's 'shot across the bow'
    American City Business Journals

    Apple, Silicon Valley chip stocks hammered after Trump's 'shot across the bow'

    Shares of Apple and Silicon Valley's semiconductor companies were pummeled on Friday as President Trump responded to new tariffs from China with a tweet saying he's demanding that American companies "immediately start looking for an alternative to China."

  • Qualcomm Won't Have to Renegotiate Licenses During FTC Appeal
    Bloomberg

    Qualcomm Won't Have to Renegotiate Licenses During FTC Appeal

    (Bloomberg) -- Qualcomm Inc. won’t have to renegotiate its patent licenses while appealing an antitrust ruling won by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, a federal appeals court ruled.Qualcomm has raised “serious questions” about the merits of the trial court’s ruling, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit said Friday in an order putting the May 21 decision on hold.Forcing the chipmaker to enter into new contracts imposes changes that “cannot be easily undone should Qualcomm prevail on appeal,” the three-judge panel in San Francisco said in a seven-page order that was unusually detailed. There’s no guarantee the three judges who considered Qualcomm’s request will be on the panel hearing the appeal in JanuaryU.S. District Judge Lucy Koh found in May that Qualcomm’s “no license, no chips” policy unfairly leveraged the company’s market position to force customers to pay inflated prices for chips and royalties for their technology. She ordered the company to end the policy and renegotiate some of its contracts.Read More: Judge’s Conundrum: Is Qualcomm a Monopolist, or Merely a Bully?Qualcomm has argued that Koh’s order would undermine its entire business. Under the original ruling, the company would be forced to renegotiate patent-licensing contracts with phone makers, a process that could slash its largest source of profit. It would create binding arrangements that wouldn’t be reversed, even if Qualcomm got the ruling overturned on appeal.The San Diego-based chipmaker is unusual in the chip industry because it gets the majority of its profit from fees on patents that cover the fundamentals of how modern phone systems work. Apple Inc., Samsung Electronics Co. and all of the world’s biggest phone makers have to pay whether or not they use its chips. That arrangement has caused intense legal fights and regulatory scrutiny around the world for Qualcomm.The case has split the U.S. government, especially the two agencies charged with antitrust matters. While the FTC -- an independent agency -- argued that Qualcomm harmed competition, the U.S. Justice Department said Koh’s ruling harmed consumers.Qualcomm also got the backing of other areas of the Trump administration, as both the Defense Department and Department of Energy said the order threatens national security and America’s lead role in 5G, the next-generation of wireless technology that promises to transform everything from robotic surgery to autonomous vehicles.“Whether the district court’s order and injunction represent a trailblazing application of the antitrust laws, or instead an improper excursion beyond the outer limits of the Sherman Act, is a matter for another day,” the appeals panel said, referring to the federal antitrust law.The language of the ruling has improved Qualcomm’s chance of winning the appeal or reaching a settlement with the agency, said Jennifer Rie, an analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence.Ankur Kapoor, an antitrust lawyer with Constantine Cannon in New York who’s not involved in the case, said the panel’s detailed ruling may be an attempt to “explain their thinking” in a case with high stakes for the company. He said the court wanted to maintain the status quo, especially considering the potential impact to Qualcomm’s long-term business and the fact that the appeal is being expedited, with a decision expected shortly after January arguments.In some ways, Qualcomm’s licensing program “appears significantly impaired regardless” because of the legal strains on the company and the slowdown in the “horrendous” chip market, said Stacy Rasgon, an analyst with Bernstein Research.FTC ‘Disappointed’FTC Bureau of Competition Director Bruce Hoffman said he was disappointed in the court’s ruling and noted that only part of the court’s ruling was put on hold. Qualcomm still can’t enter into exclusive deals on modem chips, can’t interfere with any customer’s ability to communicate with government agencies and must submit to monitoring, which the FTC said promotes competition. Qualcomm didn’t ask the appeals court to put those aspects on hold.“The Bureau of Competition will monitor Qualcomm’s conduct relating to the on-going injunctive provisions, and we stand ready to evaluate any information from industry participants relating to whether Qualcomm is complying with its obligations,” Hoffman said.The court order previews some of the arguments that Qualcomm is expected to make when it files its written arguments with the Ninth Circuit later Friday. Qualcomm will argue that Koh stretched the definition of antitrust rules under U.S. law and ignored evidence that showed there was competition.Koh had no right to decide that Qualcomm’s rates were unreasonable, order the company to give licenses to its competitors or decide whether or not it has to supply chips to handset makers, the San Diego-based company contends.The case is Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm, 17-220, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit (San Francisco).To contact the reporters on this story: Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Peter Blumberg, Steve StrothFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow Jones Today: Hello Darkness, My Old Friend
    InvestorPlace

    Dow Jones Today: Hello Darkness, My Old Friend

    Investors waiting on encouraging comments from leaders such as Fed Chairman Jerome Powell and President Donald Trump did not get what they were hoping for Friday.Source: Shutterstock Stocks tumbled after President Trump took to Twitter (NASDAQ:TWTR) to -- you guessed it -- deride China AND the Fed. As I noted on Thursday, Powell's comments from the Jackson Hole economic conference today took on added importance after the FOMC minutes out earlier this week indicated the July rate cut doesn't mean more are coming. A pair of Fed governors affirmed that notion Thursday.Put simply, Powell's Wyoming remarks weren't dovish enough for the president or markets as evidenced by Friday's tumble. Trump pondered on Twitter "My only question is, who is our bigger enemy, Jay Powell or Chairman Xi?"InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsSpeaking of China, the world's second-largest economy is promising new tariffs on U.S. goods, an overture to which Trump had plenty to say."The vast amounts of money made and stolen by China from the United States, year after year, for decades, will and must STOP," said the president on Twitter. "Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing .your companies HOME and making your products in the USA. I will be responding to China's Tariffs this afternoon. This is a GREAT opportunity for the United States. Also, I am ordering all carriers, including Fed Ex, Amazon, UPS and the Post Office, to SEARCH FOR & REFUSE all deliveries of Fentanyl from China (or anywhere else!). Fentanyl kills 100,000 Americans a year. President Xi said this would stop - it didn't. Our Economy, because of our gains in the last 2 1/2 years, is MUCH larger than that of China. We will keep it that way!"All of that conjecture gets us to a glum end of the week with Nasdaq Composite sinking 3% while the S&P 500 lost 2.59%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 2.37%. In late trading, just one Dow stock was in the green: Boeing (NYSE:BA). Too Many Losers on the DowIn late trading, 19 of the 29 Dow offenders were lower by 2% or more, underscoring just how bad of day it was for equities. Among those losers were plenty of tariff-sensitive names, including Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), which was the worst performer in the Dow today with a loss of 4.62%.In other news, it's hard to get excited about a stock like Nike (NYSE:NKE) on a day when trade tensions surge and Foot Locker (NYSE:FL) plunges on bad earnings. Shares of Nike reflected as much with a Friday slide of 3.33%, but at least one analyst defended the athletic apparel giant. Guggenheim named Nike to its "best ideas" list today.The research firm said "the company is positioned well to maneuver through tariff risks, and that Nike's latest earnings and robust product pipeline were impressive. Also of note, Nike has joined 31 other major retailers in signing a pact for better environmental efforts, which will be presented at this weekend's Group of Seven (G-7) summit," according to Schaeffer's Investment Research.In the search for good news today, one that was difficult as it pertains to members of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, another tidbit I have to offer up is Betsy Graseck, global head of banks and diversified finance research at Morgan Stanley, making some bullish comments on Dow components American Express (NYSE:AXP) and JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM) in an interview with Barron's.Graseck highlighted JPM's big buybacks as earnings booster and the ability of American Express to weather a recession thanks to its more affluent clientele.In other glum news, oil prices traded lower and already-struggling shares of Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM) were hit wit a downward price target revision with UBS paring its forecast on the stock to $75 from $87. That new target still implies some decent upside from today's close for the largest domestic oil company. Bottom Line on Dow Jones TodayI don't like sounding alarm bells, but the president's comments directed toward China today are very hard to retract. To be fair, he's on point when it comes to the fentanyl issue, but ordering U.S. companies to stop manufacturing in China is a gambit that will not bear fruit anytime soon.This trade war, now reaching new, ominous heights, is likely to stoke recession speculation. The only good news there is that the Fed will likely attempt intervention via rate cuts.Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Retail Stocks to Buy on the Dip * 7 Marijuana Stocks With Critical Levels to Watch * 7 Internet of Things Stocks to Buy Now The post Dow Jones Today: Hello Darkness, My Old Friend appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • MarketWatch

    Apple shares slump nearly 5% on Trump's tough talk on China

    Shares of Apple Inc. dove 4.6% on Friday after President Donald Trump said he's ordering U.S. companies to start looking for "an alternative to China." Trump's pronouncement, which sent the Dow down more than 600 points, came after Beijing announced retaliatory tariffs on imports of U.S. goods. Apple gleans 18.3% of its total revenue from mainland China, second only to the U.S.'s 36.9%, according to FactSet. Nearly all of the company's flagship iPhones are built in China, creating economic and political tension between Trump and Apple CEO Tim Cook, who strongly opposes tariffs against China. Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives referred to Friday's selloff as "a gut punch to Cupertino." Apple is headquartered in Cupertino, Calif. Apple shares are up 28% this year.

  • MarketWatch

    Apple Inc., Intel share losses contribute to Dow's 582-point fall

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is slumping Friday afternoon with shares of Apple Inc. and Intel facing the biggest losses for the index. The Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 582 points (2.