GOOG - Alphabet Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
1,146.35
-7.23 (-0.63%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

1,146.35 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 5:51PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close1,153.58
Open1,150.97
Bid1,140.73 x 800
Ask1,147.52 x 800
Day's Range1,145.78 - 1,158.36
52 Week Range970.11 - 1,289.27
Volume1,002,585
Avg. Volume1,558,091
Market Cap795.805B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.99
PE Ratio (TTM)28.76
EPS (TTM)39.86
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est1,275.00
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • AlphaSense, a search engine for analysis and business intel, raises $50M led by Innovation Endeavors
    TechCrunch12 hours ago

    AlphaSense, a search engine for analysis and business intel, raises $50M led by Innovation Endeavors

    Google and its flagship search portal opened the door to the possibilities ofhow to build a business empire on the back of organising and navigating theworld's information, as found on the internet

  • iOS and Android are about to get a bunch of new emoji
    TechCrunch23 hours ago

    iOS and Android are about to get a bunch of new emoji

    Tomorrow is World Emoji Day. Why is there a World Emoji Day? To recognize the day, Apple and Google have both shed some light on their plans regarding new emoji coming to their operating systems in the coming months.

  • EU Probes Amazon As Politicians Hammer Big Tech, But 2 FANGs Are In Buy Zones
    Investor's Business Daily2 hours ago

    EU Probes Amazon As Politicians Hammer Big Tech, But 2 FANGs Are In Buy Zones

    The EU's Amazon probe is part of a global regulatory and political push v. Big Tech, also including Facebook, Google, Apple. Investors should take threats to their business models seriously.

  • Read this before using FaceApp — you give up more personal data than you realize on this Russian-made app
    MarketWatch2 hours ago

    Read this before using FaceApp — you give up more personal data than you realize on this Russian-made app

    FaceApp has gone viral again with a feature that makes users look elderly, but experts say it may pose security concerns.

  • Barrons.com4 hours ago

    Facebook and Alphabet Are Best Internet Stocks Headed Into Earnings, Analyst Says

    Facebook and Alphabet stock are good buying opportunities headed into their earnings reports, according to KeyBanc’s Andy Hargreaves. “We believe ad spending across the major internet platforms remained solid in 2Q and expect positive results in the space,” he wrote.

  • Facebook Hires Vine’s Former Leader to Counter TikTok's Growth
    Motley Fool4 hours ago

    Facebook Hires Vine’s Former Leader to Counter TikTok's Growth

    The tech giant’s new idea incubator wants to cook up a rival for the popular short video app.

  • Zacks5 hours ago

    eBay Earnings After The Bell: Can The Rally Continue?

    EBAY has displayed a sharp rally so far in 2019, surging 42.5% since January 1st, far outperforming the e-commerce sector. Analysts have been increasing long term earnings estimates, propelling EBAY into a Zacks Rank 1 (Strong Buy).

  • Kleiner Perkins leads another financing round of Framingham-based startup
    American City Business Journals5 hours ago

    Kleiner Perkins leads another financing round of Framingham-based startup

    One of the most prominent Silicon Valley VC firms, known for being among the backers of Google, Slack and Spotify, is reconfirming its interest in a local early-stage startup by pouring more capital in a newly announced round of funding.

  • Libra and Big Tech Go to Capitol Hill and Cryptocurrencies Fall
    Market Realist5 hours ago

    Libra and Big Tech Go to Capitol Hill and Cryptocurrencies Fall

    Yesterday, Facebook’s (FB) David Marcus, head of Facebook’s Calibra wallet, visited Capitol Hill to testify in front of the Senate Banking Committee.

  • Amazon May Have Invited Big Risk Without Much Reward
    Bloomberg6 hours ago

    Amazon May Have Invited Big Risk Without Much Reward

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A question for Amazon.com Inc.: Why ever bother?The European Commission opened an investigation on Wednesday into whether the e-commerce titan uses data from sellers on its marketplace to make competing products of its own. If the suspicion is confirmed, it might expose Amazon to billions of dollars of fines. Another tech behemoth, Google parent Alphabet Inc., has run afoul of European antitrust authorities and paid $9 billion in various penalties over the past few years.Given the relative profitability of Amazon’s businesses, what the EU is contending would seem to be a foolish risk. Broadly speaking, Amazon’s website sells products in two ways: Through its own store and through its marketplace. The store buys goods from a supplier and then sells them to a customer, much in the style of any classic retailer. The marketplace, however, simply connects a customer with a seller. That seller might pay Amazon to store or deliver its goods, but it’s essentially a platform. That also means it’s a far higher margin business because Amazon incurs few costs. It doesn’t have to pay to make the product or for its distribution unless the seller contracts it to do so.The EU is accusing Amazon of using that marketplace to identify popular products and then create copycat versions with its own branding, displacing the original. If true, it may have made itself vulnerable to billions of dollars in fines. It says that its own brand products account for about 1% of its retail offerings. That translates to about $1.4 billion of revenue. Given the low-margin nature of so many of the products (batteries, crockery, paper clips), profit is significantly less than that. The regulatory risks surely outweigh the financial benefits.That’s even taking into account the side effect of reducing prices for competing products. After being undercut by an Amazon private label offering, a seller might slash its prices to win customers. Lower prices mean more products sold on the marketplace, which is also good news for Amazon, though if the EU’s assertion is right and the intention was to mimic products that already sell well, it’s hard to see why lower prices might have been necessary.Amazon said it “will cooperate fully with the European Commission and continue working hard to support businesses of all sizes and help them grow.”Given the headaches and potential cost of the EU investigation, the company would do well to take that statement to heart and simply focus on being a marketplace.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Big Tech Is in Big Trouble in Europe and the US
    Market Realist6 hours ago

    Big Tech Is in Big Trouble in Europe and the US

    Over the last few quarters, big tech companies have been under the scanner. There are issues ranging from monopoly to handling customer data.

  • Reuters8 hours ago

    REFILE-RPT-Starting with Netflix, FANG reports to test Wall St rally's mettle

    A wave of quarterly reports from Netflix and other top-tier, high-growth companies starting on Wednesday will test Wall Street's willingness to extend a recent rally driven by expectations of lower interest rates. Facebook, Amazon and Google-owner Alphabet , all part of the so-called FANG group of widely held stocks, have jumped over 5% so far in July, with investors increasingly willing to bet on the volatile names thanks to expectations the Federal Reserve will cut rates later this month by as much as half a percentage point to support economic growth. The FANG companies, combined with investor favorites Apple and Microsoft, account for about 17% of the S&P 500's $26 trillion market capitalization, making reaction to their quarterly results key to Wall Street sentiment.

  • Google vet who co-founded Ooyala unveils tech to ease data engineer shortage
    American City Business Journals8 hours ago

    Google vet who co-founded Ooyala unveils tech to ease data engineer shortage

    The Palo Alto company that promises to dramatically reduce the amount of manual labor involved in Big Data raised $19 million and came out of stealth on Wednesday.

  • Trump threatens to investigate Google for ‘treason’ following Thiel segment on Fox News
    American City Business Journals9 hours ago

    Trump threatens to investigate Google for ‘treason’ following Thiel segment on Fox News

    On a new crusade against Google, tech investor Peter Thiel found a sympathetic audience this week with President Donald Trump, who vowed to investigate the tech investor's unsubstantiated claims that Google may have committed “treason” by working with Chinese authorities.

  • Benzinga9 hours ago

    It's Almost Time For These Leveraged Media ETFs

    The market is in the midst of second-quarter earnings season. This week, the bulk of reports are coming courtesy of blue-chip companies, but traders waiting on more exciting growth fare will not have to ...

  • Report: Google is taking free lunches away from some workers in San Jose
    American City Business Journals9 hours ago

    Report: Google is taking free lunches away from some workers in San Jose

    Google was one of the first companies to popularize free food for its employees, and now serves tens of thousands of gourmet meals across the globe every day. 
But that perk apparently didn’t make it to a new office in San Jose that’s staffed by contractors.

  • Business is Still Good at Alphabet: Google Stock’s a Buy
    InvestorPlace9 hours ago

    Business is Still Good at Alphabet: Google Stock’s a Buy

    I last wrote about Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL) May 1 just after the company reported an earnings miss. Down more than 8% on the news, I recommended investors buy Google stock despite the miss. Source: Shutterstock InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsHeading into next week's second-quarter earnings call, I thought I'd revisit some of the seven reasons I gave for buying GOOGL stock. * 9 Retail Stocks Goldman Sachs Says Are Ready to Rip Analysts aren't expecting much from Alphabet, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't consider buying Alphabet stock at current prices. Here's why. Analysts Still Like Google StockAlthough analysts grew less confident about Alphabet after its first-quarter results -- eight cut the Google target price on the news -- 34 still have a buy rating, with three giving it an overweight rating and only six a hold. None have a sell rating on Google stock.The target price? $1,335.22 is the average with a high of $1,500 and a low of $1,150. At the average target price, investors are looking at 16% upside over the next 12 months. I don't know about you, but I'd take a 16% annual return every day of the week and twice on Sundays.Analysts might have lowered their target prices, but when 86% of investors have a buy or overweight rating on its stock, there must be something good about the company. Google Cloud Continues to GrowAs I wrote back in May, Google's cloud operation is playing catch-up with both Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) and Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) when it comes to the cloud. Can it catch the two market leaders? Probably not, but it's trying hard to keep up. On July 11, Alphabet announced that it hired Kirsten Kliphouse as Google Cloud's head of North American sales, a newly created position, to enable it to go after small, medium, and enterprise customers.Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian has been busy filling out the division's sales team so that it can better compete against Amazon and Microsoft. In addition to hiring Kliphouse, Kurian also announced that he brought over Eduardo Lopez as head of Latin American sales, also a newly created position. Lopez and Kurian worked together for 20 years at Oracle (NASDAQ:ORCL) before Kurian left in 2018 to head up Google Cloud. In addition to making plenty of hires, Alphabet is also making a few acquisitions. In the past three months it has bought Looker, a data analytics firm, for $2.6 billion. Google also made a smaller acquisition of cloud storage company Elastifile and moved cybersecurity firm Chronicle into Google Cloud from outside Alphabet. "Kirsten and Eduardo are inspirational business leaders who will ensure we continue to build strong relationships with users, including HSBC, UPS, Whirlpool and many others, " Rob Enslin, president of global customer operations for Google Cloud, told CNBC in an email. "Their expertise in running multi-billion dollar sales organizations and managing large teams will be invaluable as we focus on accelerating our growth."Although Google's search business generates the lion's share of the company's revenues, these latest moves should help it grow other parts of its business, especially the cloud. GOOG Stock's Massive Free Cash FlowIn the trailing 12 months, Alphabet generated $25.5 billion in free cash flow. Given its current enterprise value is $690.1 billion, Alphabet stock currently has a free cash flow yield of 3.7%, which suggests that it's fairly valued at the moment. However, any time a business can generate 15 cents of free cash flow from every dollar of sales as Google does, it's not nearly as worrisome when sales growth slows to 17%, as is expected by analysts in the second quarter. Since 2016, Alphabet's free cash flow has been above $20 billion, which allows it to make more significant investments in all of its various businesses. Capital allocation continues to be a big reason why Google stock will continue to move higher. With Ruth Porat as CFO, you can be sure that the money will continue to be spent wisely. Financially, Alphabet has never been stronger. At the time of this writing Will Ashworth did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 9 Retail Stocks Goldman Sachs Says Are Ready to Rip * 7 Services Stocks to Buy for the Rest of 2019 * 6 Stocks to Buy and 1 to Sell Based on Insider Trading The post Business is Still Good at Alphabet: Google Stocka€™s a Buy appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Tech’s day of reckoning on Capitol Hill was long and harsh
    MarketWatch10 hours ago

    Tech’s day of reckoning on Capitol Hill was long and harsh

    Tech’s day of reckoning Tuesday on Capitol Hill started with skepticism about Facebook Inc.’s proposed digital currency, and ended with a spirited debate over charges of anti-conservative bias on Alphabet Inc.’s Google search. In between, the industry’s big four took some body blows from both political parties.

  • TheStreet.com10 hours ago

    [video]Big Tech Hearings and Scrutiny 'More Bark Than Bite,' Says FAANG Bull

    The latest government scrutiny could even end up being a long-term positive for Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Alphabet, says analyst Dan Ives.

  • Most of the World’s Companies Are Duds, Stock Picker Says
    Bloomberg11 hours ago

    Most of the World’s Companies Are Duds, Stock Picker Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Two years ago, an Arizona State University professor made waves with a study showing all the wealth created by U.S. stocks is the result of gains in a weirdly small group of companies. Now he’s back with an update that shows the situation is no cheerier in the rest of the world.Hendrik Bessembinder, a 62-year-old researcher in financial market design, and his team sifted through about 62,000 stocks traded in more than 40 countries between 1990 and 2018. Their finding: about 60% were such duds they did worse than one-month U.S. Treasury notes. The proportion was even greater than in the initial study, which focused on the U.S.The findings have implications for everything from wealth creation to the math measuring investor skill, but got the most notice in the active-vs-passive debate. Since big gains are so rare and yet so crucial to overall returns, it helps explain why stock pickers struggle to keep up with indexes.“It is historically the norm in the U.S. and around the world that a few top-performing companies have great influence over how the market does overall,” Bessembinder, a professor at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State, said by phone. “It’s the norm and I expect it to be the case in the future.”It’s the observation that so few do so much for so many when it comes to the generous gains offered by share indexes. While the equity market as a whole created over $44 trillion in shareholder wealth between 1990 and 2018 and beat Treasury notes, the total is reliant on gigantic, compounding returns from a just a handful of companies, the report says.By themselves, Apple Inc., Microsoft Corp., Alphabet Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Exxon Mobil Corp. accounted for more than 8% of global net wealth creation during the period. Most of the rest generated negative wealth.Investors have heard this refrain before, that just a scant few pull the pack. And it’s easy to see their outsize influence: Microsoft, Apple, Amazon.com and Facebook Inc. account for more than 20% of the S&P 500’s returns this year. That number is even starker for the tech-heavy Nasdaq 100, for instance, where those four companies account for about 50% of gains.But Bessembinder and his team, including two co-authors from Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Goeun Choi of Arizona State, are among the first to look at the phenomenon long-term. The best-performing 306 firms accounted for about three-quarters of global net wealth creation during the 28-year period of the study, they found. Just 811 companies could be framed as accounting for all of it.Their findings echo Bessembinder’s previous work. In looking at nearly nine decades of U.S. stock and bond performance, he found that out of 26,000 stocks, about 58% underperform Treasury bills in their lifespan.To contact the reporter on this story: Vildana Hajric in New York at vhajric1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Chris NagiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.