GOOG - Alphabet Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
1,103.60
+11.10 (+1.02%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

1,103.60 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:45PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close1,092.50
Open1,109.69
Bid1,103.01 x 800
Ask1,109.00 x 4000
Day's Range1,099.00 - 1,116.39
52 Week Range970.11 - 1,289.27
Volume1,215,826
Avg. Volume1,514,439
Market Cap766.457B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.14
PE Ratio (TTM)27.69
EPS (TTM)39.86
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est1,275.00
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Salesforce exec: There is a 'crisis of trust' in big tech
    Yahoo Finance4 hours ago

    Salesforce exec: There is a 'crisis of trust' in big tech

    Big tech is under the microscope, now that U.S. regulators investigate whether Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), Facebook (FB), and Google (GOOG) have too much power. As calls for breaking up these tech titans gain momentum among lawmakers, at least one Silicon Valley insider says “trust” is at the crux of the increased scrutiny. “I think regulators are really responding to a crisis of trust in the tech industry,” Salesforce (CRM) President, Bret Taylor, tells Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade.

  • Google now lets you flag deceptive sites with a new Chrome extension
    TechCrunch5 hours ago

    Google now lets you flag deceptive sites with a new Chrome extension

    Google today launched a new Chrome extension that allows you to flagsuspicious sites for inclusion in the company's Safe Browsing index, which isused by Chrome and a number of third-party browsers

  • Salesforce President discusses company's latest launches and acquisitions
    Yahoo Finance Video8 hours ago

    Salesforce President discusses company's latest launches and acquisitions

    Cloud-based company Salesforce announced its latest platform, New Customer 360 Innovations, at its Salesforce Connections conference today in Chicago. On the heels of this announcement, Salesforce President and Chief Product Officer Bret Taylor joins Yahoo Finance to discuss what he perceives to be the next phase of the digital revolution, and how Salesforce is already getting ahead.

  • Carmen Sandiego returns to Google Earth with a new caper
    TechCrunch11 hours ago

    Carmen Sandiego returns to Google Earth with a new caper

    Google Earth first made use of its rich global 3D visualization as a backdropfor a Carmen Sandiego tie-in back in March, but today there's a new adventureto explore

  • Chipmakers QCOM and AVGO Bounce-Back After Rough Week
    Zacks56 minutes ago

    Chipmakers QCOM and AVGO Bounce-Back After Rough Week

    Recently, there has been significant turmoil surrounding the electronics component sector, specifically in wireless equipment and semiconductors. This was mostly due to the US blacklist of Huawei in May, coupled with increased US-China trade war tensions.

  • HP Enterprise to Move Toward Subscription Model, Chasing Amazon
    Bloomberg1 hour ago

    HP Enterprise to Move Toward Subscription Model, Chasing Amazon

    (Bloomberg) -- Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. will make all its products available through subscriptions, Chief Executive Officer Antonio Neri’s biggest move yet to shield the server maker from growing cloud-computing competition.HPE’s computer servers, storage hardware, networking gear and software will be available through a pay-per-use or subscription model by 2022, the San Jose, California-based company said Tuesday in a statement.Neri took over the company in February 2018, and has focused on keeping HPE relevant in a changing market for information technology. Cloud vendors such as Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. have seen booming sales while global server demand has stagnated. First, Neri downplayed the threat from the public cloud companies, investing $4 billion in edge computing, which lets clients process information on hardware far away from data centers and he touted as the next wave of computing. Recently, HPE has taken a more pragmatic approach, forming a partnership with Google that will help clients adopt a hybrid model -- to move information between their own corporate data centers and large public clouds.HPE made the subscription announcement at its annual Discover conference in Las Vegas. This is the company’s most significant effort to generate more recurring revenue, which can help boost overall sales. HPE’s revenue has shrunk in the last two quarters compared with a year earlier.“We will reshape HPE and transform the market, with a new and better way to deliver as a service,” Neri said in a statement.To contact the reporter on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google Pledges $1 Billion to Tackle Bay Area Housing Crisis
    Bloomberg2 hours ago

    Google Pledges $1 Billion to Tackle Bay Area Housing Crisis

    (Bloomberg) -- Google pledged $1 billion over the next 10 years to try to address an affordable housing crisis in California’s Bay Area.The tech giant will re-purpose $750 million of its own land for residential use, allowing the development of at least 15,000 new homes, Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai said in a blog post on Tuesday. Another $250 million will go to incentives for developers to build at least 5,000 affordable housing units.The success of Google and other Silicon Valley technology companies has contributed to massive housing cost increases in the San Francisco Bay Area. The firms employ tens of thousands of high-earners who have bought or rented homes, leaving fewer options for poor and middle-income residents. Meanwhile, the supply of new houses and apartments has not kept up with demand.“Our goal is to help communities succeed over the long term, and make sure that everyone has access to opportunity, whether or not they work in tech,” Pichai said. He noted that just 3,000 homes were built in the South Bay area last year.Silicon Valley is the most expensive housing market in the country, with a median existing-home price of $1.2 million. The San Francisco and Oakland metro area is second with a $930,000 median, according to the National Association of Realtors.Google’s financial commitment is significant, but more companies and organizations will need to pitch in to really change housing affordability in the Bay Area, said Ray Bramson, chief impact officer for homelessness advocacy organization Destination: Home.In Santa Clara County, which encompasses San Jose, Mountain View and Palo Alto, there is a shortage of more than 35,000 affordable housing units, Bramson said. There will also need to be infrastructure improvements to handle population growth, he added.“There’s a huge, huge challenge our community is facing,” he said. “It’s going to take a tremendous amount of work.”Listen to Bloomberg’s Decrypted Podcast on Silicon Valley’s van dwellers.Google’s effort to build the region’s housing supply should be applauded, said Issi Romem, Zillow’s senior director of housing & urban economics. Still, he said, using company land for housing probably isn’t a scalable solution.“Nobody knows exactly what number of homes you need to build in the Bay Area to make housing prices grow more slowly or go flat,” Romem said. “But what we do know is that it’s a really large number” and probably “millions of housing units over a couple of decades.”One challenge for Google will be persuading local towns to support rezoning land for housing. Because of a 1978 measure that limits property-tax increases on homes, municipalities generally get more revenue from commercial development than residential, according to Margaret O’Mara, a University of Washington history professor and author of the forthcoming book, "The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America."Google isn’t the first tech giant to throw money at the housing crisis. Microsoft Corp. said in January it would spend $500 million to develop affordable housing and alleviate homelessness in the Seattle area, near its headquarters.“These are not altruistic, non-profits, they’re for-profit companies," said O’Mara. "They’re putting money into something that they’re going to benefit from not just in terms of the good press.”The philanthropy started by Facebook Inc.’s Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan is also backing an effort to address the housing shortage in the San Francisco Bay Area.(Updates with economist comment in the ninth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Kara Wetzel.To contact the reporters on this story: Gerrit De Vynck in New York at gdevynck@bloomberg.net;Noah Buhayar in Seattle at nbuhayar@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Motley Fool2 hours ago

    How Does Slack Make Money?

    And does it have a moat?

  • Osterweis Commentary - Catching the Wave: Why Secular Growth Matters
    GuruFocus.com17 minutes ago

    Osterweis Commentary - Catching the Wave: Why Secular Growth Matters

    By James Callinan: In our view, the specific market dynamics that influence a company's sales growth prospects have a greater impact on equity returns than the overall direction of the economy

  • Investors are in a euphoric state as the stock market bubble gets bigger
    MarketWatch3 hours ago

    Investors are in a euphoric state as the stock market bubble gets bigger

    European Central Bank President Mario Draghi turned ultra-dovish in a speech in Portugal on Tuesday. Is this a motivation for Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and his cohorts to cut interest rates as they meet this week? President Trump on Tuesday blasted Draghi because stimulus in Europe means a lower euro versus the dollar, giving an edge to European companies in their exports to the U.S. On the other hand, the U.S. stock market is encouraged by Trump’s tweet of a “very good” phone call with President Xi of China and the news of an extended meeting with him at the G20.

  • Google invests $1 billion to ease housing shortage near California headquarters
    Reuters3 hours ago

    Google invests $1 billion to ease housing shortage near California headquarters

    Google, which told Reuters it has 45,000 employees in the region, has been the target of local activists who for several years have said the company's growth and high salaries have contributed to rising rents and housing shortages. Google said housing had reached a "crisis point" in the Bay Area but declined to comment on whether its announcement in a blog post https://www.blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/1-billion-investment-bay-area-housing on Tuesday was a response to pressure from community activists, who plan to demonstrate Wednesday outside Alphabet's annual shareholder meeting.

  • Reuters3 hours ago

    UPDATE 1-Google invests $1 bln to ease housing shortage near California headquarters

    Alphabet Inc's Google announced on Tuesday it would set aside $750 million in land and $250 million in financing to spur developers in the San Francisco Bay Area to build at least 20,000 homes and rehabilitate other housing over the next decade. Google, which told Reuters it has 45,000 employees in the region, has been the target of local activists who for several years have said the company's growth and high salaries have contributed to rising rents and housing shortages. Google said housing had reached a "crisis point" in the Bay Area but declined to comment on whether its announcement in a blog post https://www.blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/1-billion-investment-bay-area-housing on Tuesday was a response to pressure from community activists, who plan to demonstrate Wednesday outside Alphabet's annual shareholder meeting.

  • Where’s the real harm from Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple?
    MarketWatch3 hours ago

    Where’s the real harm from Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple?

    Sloppy economic thinking is behind the push for antitrust action, writes this economist at the Cato Institute.

  • Google rolls out $1 billion plan to build up to 20,000 new homes in the Bay Area
    American City Business Journals4 hours ago

    Google rolls out $1 billion plan to build up to 20,000 new homes in the Bay Area

    Google on Tuesday unveiled a $1 billion plan to build up to 20,000 new homes in the Bay Area, with a special focus on affordable housing.

  • AT&T Stock’s TV-Driven Turbulence Will Be Worth It
    InvestorPlace5 hours ago

    AT&T Stock’s TV-Driven Turbulence Will Be Worth It

    There's no denying telecom giant AT&T (NYSE:T) has painted itself into a corner on the television front. But the owners of T stock can at least cheer the fact that, if nothing else, AT&T's video business should start to deliver better profit margins beginning next year.Source: Shutterstock That's coming at a price, of course. Subscribers of DirecTV Now , a streaming version of the satellite TV service, are cancelling in droves. Over the course of the past two reported quarters, the company has lost 1.3 million video customers. About 350,000 of those former subscribers unwilling to pay the recently-upped rates. AT&T's upcoming introduction of a Time Warner-streaming product may only fuel more DirecTV cancellations. * 5 Stocks to Buy for $20 or Less Whatever's in the cards, however, it's quite clear that AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson is finally willing to swallow the much-needed bitter pill.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips Dropping Dead WeightAT&T once assumed that using loss-leader cable-television packages to attract consumers into its ecosystem would ultimately position the company to cross-sell those customers more profitable products like broadband service and even wireless service.That's not how things panned out, though. Often sold at a promotional price point that was likely to be less than AT&T's procurement costs, the DirecTV experiment that began back in 2015 never turned into the cash cow (or even the marketing hook) it was supposed to be.A little company called Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) played a role in that disappointment as well.And, while what the future holds still isn't entirely clear now that Time Warner is part of the AT&T family, the owners of T stock can count on the future not looking like the past. Stephenson, AT&T's CEO, explained the situation at an investor conference hosted by JP Morgan last month:"This is going to be a year of just cleaning up the video business. And we've been hard at work on content agreements and getting content agreements done in a way that gives us sustainability and profitability in this business. But the other element to give you sustainable profitability is cleaning up the customer base. Because we have a number of customers on our rolls that are very low-ARPU (average revenue per user) customers and we don't see any line of sight to getting them to a profitable level. And so as these customers' contracts or whatnot are coming up, there are many who are opting to just leave…"Those lower ARPU customers aren't entirely gone, though. Analysts and investors alike are anticipating another net loss of DirecTV customers for the current quarter.But that may actually help T stock The Price War Is Cooling OffSending any customer into a rival's arms feels like a step in the wrong direction,. But there's a growing realization among most industry players tha any sort of video package has to be profitable on its own.MultiChannel News' Daniel Frankel noted in March that "The new normal (price) for (subscription TV providers) is about to be at least $50 a month."That jibes with the $50 to $60 price range AT&T's Stephenson suggested felt right in December. While that's still more than Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOGL, NASDAQ:GOOG) charges per month for access to a cable alternative called YouTube TV, YouTube TV is also believed to be losing money. Hulu, mostly owned by Walt Disney (NYSE:DIS), asks $45 per month for access to live broadcasts, but it, too, remains unprofitable largely because of the steep expenses associated with live television. But archived, on-demand content is relatively cheap.It wouldn't be unreasonable to expect rival subscription TV players to also start ratcheting their rates up now that there's no "early market share" to secure.As for a non-broadcast streaming service from T, the planned platform from Time Warner will handle those duties.The hinted monthly price of between $16 and $17 per month for the Time Warner offering would make AT&T's option pricier than Netflix's basic package. In fact, at that price point, AT&T's service would be among the most expensive online, on-demand options. It would be an incredibly robust offering though, so it would have a chance to draw a big enough crowd to enable it to actually operate in the black.The typical on-demand price point for online video also seems to be stabilizing somewhere between $12 and $20 for a reason. That's where companies can have a shot at operating in the black but still remain competitive. The Bottom Line on T StockAT&T's television business is still a moving target. Odds are good that the company will continue to bleed TV customers through the end of the year, as the lower-ARPU crowd balks at price increases and finds other options. And, with the Time Warner service not expected to come online until late this year or early next year, the remainder of 2019 could prove frustrating for the owners of AT&T stock.Don't sweat it though. These are growing pains that represents progress along the learning curve. Sustainability is finally becoming a reality, although it's out of necessity.AT&T's rivals are even starting to embrace this reality too, as are investors in T stock who would now rather see healthier profit margins than big-time revenue. That's especially true, given the company's plans this year to pay down the lion's share of the $40 billion worth of debt it took on in order to complete the Time Warner acquisition.Just don't be surprised if the transition proves to be an erratic one for AT&T stock price.As of this writing, James Brumley held a long position in AT&T. You can learn more about James at his site, jamesbrumley.com, or follow him on Twitter, at @jbrumley. More From InvestorPlace * 4 Top American Penny Pot Stocks (Buy Before June 21) * 5 Red-Hot IPO Stocks to Buy for the Long Run * 5 Stocks to Buy for $20 or Less * 4 Dow Jones Stocks Ready to Rise Compare Brokers The post AT&T Stock's TV-Driven Turbulence Will Be Worth It appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • The antitrust suspects: Facebook and Apple appear to be most at risk
    MarketWatch6 hours ago

    The antitrust suspects: Facebook and Apple appear to be most at risk

    Facebook Inc. and Apple Inc. are most at risk if government regulators are serious about pursuing antitrust actions against Big Tech.

  • Amazon and Google: Tech giants grab NYC land in very different ways
    American City Business Journals6 hours ago

    Amazon and Google: Tech giants grab NYC land in very different ways

    Google and Amazon are tech giants locked in an intensifying battle for online shoppers. Both companies also have an ever-expanding presence in New York City and require a lot of real estate to accommodate a growing workforce. Google's and Amazon's respective strategies to accomplish this, however, are completely different — one is focused on buying and the other on leasing.

  • The World Will Get Half Its Power From Wind, Solar by 2050
    Bloomberg7 hours ago

    The World Will Get Half Its Power From Wind, Solar by 2050

    (Bloomberg) -- Nearly half the world’s electricity will come from renewable energy by 2050 as costs of wind, solar and battery storage continue to plummet.That titanic shift over the next three decades will come as electricity demand increases 62% and investors pump $13.3 trillion into new projects, according to a report released Tuesday by BloombergNEF.The move away from fossil fuel has sweeping implications for energy markets and the fight to stave off climate change. Wind, solar and batteries are poised to enable the power sector to meet its share of emission cuts required under the Paris climate agreement, at least until 2030, according to BNEF. But after that, nations will need other technologies to make deeper cuts at a reasonable cost, said Matthias Kimmel, the lead analyst on the report.“To get emissions where we want them to be, we need something else,” Kimmel said in an interview.By 2050, solar and wind will supply almost 50% of the world’s electricity, with hydro, nuclear and other renewable energy resources providing another 21%, according to BNEF. Coal will be the biggest loser in the power sector, with its share of global generation plunging from 37% today to 12% in 2050, BNEF said.Those other renewables could include geothermal systems, fuel cells and devices that harvest energy from ocean waves and tides. But it’s unclear which, if any, will be economical to deploy on a mass scale. And other low-emission technologies could be developed between now and 2030.BNEF sees a more ambitious transition to clean power than one oil giant BP Plc laid out in its 2019 Energy Outlook. BP foresees renewables generating about 30% of power by 2030 under its “evolving transition” scenario, while BNEF calls for 41%. Under a different scenario, however, BP is even more bullish than BNEF, saying renewables could hit 50% by 2040.BNEF forecasts that many nations can cut power-sector emissions through 2030 in line with goals set in Paris to limit the increase in world temperatures to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). And they can do that without additional subsidies for solar and wind, BNEF said.Since 2010, the cost of wind power has dropped by 49%, and solar has plummeted 85%, according to BNEF. That makes them cheaper than new coal or gas plants in two-thirds of the world. Battery storage costs, meanwhile, have dropped 85% since 2010.If the world is to completely eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector, technologies including carbon capture and storage, hydrogen power and solar thermal plants will compete to provide about 13,000 terawatt hours of generation by 2050, according to BNEF. That’s equivalent to about half of all electricity produced today. And even if every nation scrubs emissions from the power sector, there are still ample greenhouse gases from cars, trucks, ships, airplanes, heating systems and agriculture.Europe LeadsEurope is taking the lead on the shift to renewables, which will supply 92% of the region’s electricity by 2050.China and India, which are still adding coal plants to their grids, will both get almost two-thirds of their power from mostly solar and wind by then.The U.S. will get just 43% of its power from renewables by 2050, according to BNEF.(Adds detail from BP report in seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Millicent Dent in New York at mdent13@bloomberg.net;Christopher Martin in New York at cmartin11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lynn Doan at ldoan6@bloomberg.net, Joe Ryan, Reg GaleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.