AAPL - Apple Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
206.50
+4.76 (+2.36%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close201.74
Open204.28
Bid206.65 x 1400
Ask206.50 x 1800
Day's Range203.84 - 207.16
52 Week Range142.00 - 233.47
Volume28,803,963
Avg. Volume26,666,939
Market Cap933.211B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.08
PE Ratio (TTM)17.53
EPS (TTM)11.78
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019 - Nov 4, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.08 (1.53%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-09
1y Target Est223.03
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Benzinga

    Bulls And Bears Of The Week: Apple, Cisco, Salesforce, Walmart And More

    Benzinga has examined the prospects for many investor favorite stocks over the past week. Bullish calls included tech leaders and a retail colossus. Bearish calls also included tech giants, as well as ...

  • Apple's 5 Most Profitable Business Regions (AAPL)
    Investopedia

    Apple's 5 Most Profitable Business Regions (AAPL)

    Learn about how Apple generates its profits, breaking down its results by geographic region, with all showing year-over-year improvement.

  • 3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows

    Apple, Amazon, and PayPal are swamped in cash and could swamp your portfolio with great returns.

  • The Surprising Industry the U.S.-China Trade War Could Throttle
    Motley Fool

    The Surprising Industry the U.S.-China Trade War Could Throttle

    This "green" industry could be in big trouble if President Trump gets aggressive with tariffs.

  • Barrons.com

    Harvard University Sold Apple and Facebook Stock — and Bought Alphabet

    Harvard University’s endowment made some bold stock trades in the calendar second quarter. Harvard Management Co., or HMC, the entity that manages the endowment, oversaw $405 million in U.S.-traded equities as of June 30.

  • Apple is going to be the company that kills the wallet
    Quartz

    Apple is going to be the company that kills the wallet

    There's not much left that Apple needs to take out of the physical wallet that isn't already available on the iPhone.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]For Apple Investors, Trump's Unpredictable Trade Policies Have a Silver Lining

    It's created an environment of low expectations for the stock, which trades at a much lower multiple compared to other tech giants.

  • Bloomberg

    Trump’s Dinner Guest on Friday Will Be Apple’s CEO Tim Cook

    (Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly lashed out at technology giants and their leaders, announced on Friday evening that he would be dining with Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook.“Having dinner tonight with Tim Cook of Apple,” Trump, who is staying at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, wrote on Twitter. “They will be spending vast sums of money in the U.S. Great!”He did not elaborate, and Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the meeting.Heads of other major technology companies, including Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. have not fared as well in the president’s tweets and public remarks.He and his political allies have made unsupported claims that social media companies muzzle conservative views. Trump has assailed Amazon for edging out brick-and-mortar retailers and criticized its founder Jeff Bezos, who owns the Washington Post.Pressure on tech companies is increasing in Washington as congressional Republicans examine accusations of bias against conservatives; Democrats in the House conduct an antitrust inquiry and officials at the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission divvy up oversight of Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon.Earlier this week, FTC Chairman Joe Simons said in an interview that he wouldn’t let Trump’s complaints about the size and political inclinations of large technology platforms affect his agency’s decisions.Cook visited the White House in June to discuss the Trump administration’s efforts to develop job training programs that meet the changing demands of U.S. employers. The meeting was part of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, a working group that includes many corporate leaders. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Trump’s daughter and adviser Ivanka Trump unveiled the initiative earlier this year.\--With assistance from Alistair Barr.To contact the reporter on this story: John Harney in Washington at jharney2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kevin Whitelaw at kwhitelaw@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Trump says he is having dinner Friday with Apple CEO Cook

    U.S. President Donald Trump said he was having dinner on Friday with Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook of Apple Inc, a company the president has criticized for not manufacturing more of its products in the United States. The White House did not immediately respond to a question about the agenda for the dinner and what Trump was referring to when he said Apple would be spending vast sums in the United States. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

  • Sino-US Trade Tension Softens: ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    Sino-US Trade Tension Softens: ETFs in Focus

    We study some ETFs, which might benefit from Trump's latest move to delay tariffs on an array of Chinese imports.

  • Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter

    New positions include David Tepper’s former top holding Micron Technology Continue reading...

  • WeWork IPO: Is The We Company Comparable to Apple?
    Market Realist

    WeWork IPO: Is The We Company Comparable to Apple?

    WeWork is gearing up for an IPO. On Wednesday, the company made its IPO filing with the SEC public and expects to garner $3.5 billion from its IPO.

  • GuruFocus.com

    US Indexes Rally Friday, but Close Lower for the Aug. 16 Week

    S&P; 500 down 1% for the week Continue reading...

  • Dow Jones Finds Crucial Support As Big-Cap Tech Stocks Rally
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Finds Crucial Support As Big-Cap Tech Stocks Rally

    Major indexes rallied in the stock market today to cap a wild week as the Nasdaq and small caps led, and the Dow Jones industrials found key support.

  • Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday
    InvestorPlace

    Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday

    Despite more speculation that recession clouds are gathering, stocks cobbled together impressive gains to close another wild week. I mentioned earlier this week that some of the more important European economies, including Germany, are on the cusp of economic contractions and that are likely to spur the European Central Bank (ECB) into action.That was one catalyst for today's rally: talk that the ECB won't be sitting on the sidelines much longer and will attempt something with monetary policy aimed at perking up the region's sagging economies.Here in the U.S., it still seems like a stretch to say that a recession is imminent, but the University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index reading out today could be cause for concern for fans of President Donald Trump. That survey indicates independent and republican voters are growing concerned about the economy and could be apt to rein in spending. That data point was revealed just a day after the president spoke glowingly about the economy and the strength of the American consumer.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On Even with all the recession chatter, the Nasdaq Composite rallied 1.67% while the S&P 500 climbed 1.44%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed the week with a gain of 1.20%. Fun fact, at least for day traders or those that like volatility: the S&P 500 has had intraday moves of at least 1% for nearly three straight trading weeks. Tariff TalkThese days, it's almost possible to discuss stocks, particularly many of the Dow members, with talking about tariffs. Plenty of stocks are more tariff-sensitive than others, and JPMorgan was talking about a few of those names today.Remember that while President Trump backed off some of the tariffs on Chinese goods set to go into effect on Sept. 1, he did not back off all of those levies. And the ones not going into effect next month were not eliminated. Those were merely delayed until mid-December.As for companies likely to be affected by the Sept.1 tariffs, those names include Dow components Dow (NYSE:DOW) and Caterpillar (NYSE:CAT). Somehow, Dow, the chemicals maker, was the second-best performer in the Dow today while industrial machinery maker Caterpillar was a solid gainer as well, adding 0.97%.Regarding Dow members that could be pinched by the December tariffs, assuming those penalties go into effect, JPMorgan includes Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Nike (NYSE:NKE) on that list. However, both stocks closed higher today.The Home Depot (NYSE:HD) has been receiving elevated trade-related mentions, according to JPMorgan. Still, Home Depot is a heavily domestic company and the shares added 0.92% today ahead of next Tuesday's earnings report. Bad Bank Stocks on the DowEach of the Dow's financial services components, including JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM), the largest U.S. bank, closed higher today. I mention this because, yes, banks are being drilled by declining net interest margin expectations at the hands of lower interest rates, but also because recent price action in the sector confirms investors can be confounded by analyst chatter.Just last week, a Wells Fargo analyst said valuations on bank stocks are attractive, but today the same analyst said "there is no way to sugar coat the negative impact of lower interest rates" on banks' net interest margins and per share earnings.As I pointed out a couple of times during financial services earnings season, the net interest margin issued was raised on a slew of bank earnings calls and at this point, should be baked into these stocks. Dow Jones Bottom LineWith all the aforementioned recession chatter swirling, the good news is that the Federal Reserve will not take that talk lightly and it is becoming increasingly likely that there could be another two rate cuts before the end of this year.While that may be good news, the risk is that with rates already so low by historical standards, the effectiveness of more rate reductions may not be up to investors' current expectations. Time will tell on that front, but the near-term path of least resistance would be for trade wars to cease.Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio: All 47 Buffett Stocks
    Kiplinger

    The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio: All 47 Buffett Stocks

    When folks think of the Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) portfolio and its collection of holdings, most of which were selected by Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, the companies that most readily come to mind are probably American Express (AXP), Coca-Cola (KO) and, more recently, Apple (AAPL).But a deep dive into Berkshire Hathaway's equity holdings reveals a more complicated picture.Berkshire Hathaway held positions in 47 separate stocks as of June 30, according to the most recent regulatory filing (Aug. 14) with the Securities and Exchange Commission - down from 48 in the first quarter of this year, as he dumped USG Corp. (USG). But the portfolio of "Buffett stocks" isn't as diversified as the number might suggest. In some cases, BRK.B holds more than one share class in the same company. Some holdings are so small as to be immaterial leftovers from earlier bets the Oracle of Omaha has yet to completely exit.And perhaps most importantly, Berkshire Hathaway's equity portfolio is actually pretty concentrated. The top six holdings account for almost 70% of the portfolio's total value. The top 10 positions comprise 80%. Banks and airlines, to cite a couple of sectors, carry quite a load in this portfolio. Then there's the fact that several Buffett stocks actually were picked by portfolio managers Todd Combs and Ted Weschler.Here, we examine each and every holding to give investors a better understanding of the entire Berkshire Hathaway portfolio. SEE ALSO: 50 Top Stocks That Billionaires Love

  • How Does Fortnite Make Money: Online Gaming, eSports
    Investopedia

    How Does Fortnite Make Money: Online Gaming, eSports

    Fortnite is the most popular battle-royale game world wide, and generates huge revenues even though it is offered for free by developer, Epic Games.

  • Apple’s Mac Shipments Could Outpace the Global Market
    Market Realist

    Apple’s Mac Shipments Could Outpace the Global Market

    Apple’s Mac notebook shipments outperformed the global market in Q2 with 19.8% YoY growth to 3.2 million units. Global notebook PC shipments rose 0.9% YoY.

  • Gauging Analysts’ Sentiment for Apple Stock
    Market Realist

    Gauging Analysts’ Sentiment for Apple Stock

    This month, Apple stock has fallen 5.3%, dragged down by US-China trade tensions' potential impact on key Apple products.

  • Motley Fool

    Nike Makes Moves to Control Its Retail Inventory

    The company is using RFID and artificial intelligence to monitor inventory.

  • Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet
    Bloomberg

    Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Two years ago, 10 sailors died when the U.S. Navy’s guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with a chemical tanker off Singapore. An investigation has determined that insufficient training and inadequate operating procedures were to blame, and both factors were related to a new touch-screen-based helm control system. The Navy has decided to revert its destroyers back to entirely physical throttles and helm controls.It’s worth exploring the Navy’s rationale for installing touch-screens (“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” says Rear Admiral Bill Galinis), as well as its rationale for getting rid of them:Galinis said that bridge design is something that shipbuilders have a lot of say in, as it’s not covered by any particular specification that the Navy requires builders to follow. As a result of innovation and a desire to incorporate new technology, “we got away from the physical throttles, and that was probably the number-one feedback from the fleet – they said, just give us the throttles that we can use.”There are lessons here — including a prescient one from 50 years ago — for other, more mundane transport-control interfaces as well.Large, interactive touch-screens are becoming increasingly prevalent in passenger cars; in the case of Tesla, they’re the only control interface. They’re lovely to look at, but as the Navy’s experience suggests, they might be more confusing than physical controls. That confusion isn’t academic, either: Distracted driving is an increasingly dangerous problem. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10% of all fatal crashes from 2012 to 2017 involved distracted drivers. Mobile phones are a major cause of distraction, as we’d expect, but they’re an even bigger problem for younger drivers.Almost 50 years ago, robotics professor Masahiro Mori wrote an extraordinary essay, “The Uncanny Valley,” on people’s reactions to robots as they became more and more humanlike. As Mori said, our affinity for robots rises as they more closely resemble humans. That affinity plunges, becoming negative and finally rising again once a robot reaches the (possibly unattainable) full likeness of a human being.Something similar is at work in our current touch-screen-filled vehicles. To an extent, adding more screen real estate give us more information, and with it more safety — until it begins to provide an overwhelming amount of information and an overly complex set of choices for visual navigation. And moving from one information-rich interface to another is increasingly difficult, as another Navy rear admiral said in reviewing the John S. McCain collision:When you look at a screen, where do you find heading? Is it in the same place, or do you have to hunt every time you go to a different screen? So the more commonality we can drive into these kind of human-machine interfaces, the better it is for the operator to quickly pick up what the situational awareness is, whatever aspect he’s looking at, whether it’s helm control, radar pictures, whatever. So we’re trying to drive that.There are two ways our in-car screens could evolve. The first is that, for safety’s sake, they’ll move back down the curve, so to speak, and be less ambiguous and more full of knobs and dials and physical throttles. That’s the Navy’s new approach. The second, though, is that we won’t go back, at least in passenger applications, to a more tactile interface of specific controls. We’re probably going to get more screens, with more information. Maybe the only way out of this valley is to shift the interface completely to voice or, in the very long run, to obviate the issue by having cars drive themselves. That could be how we navigate this uncanny valley of vehicle interfaces — the removal of any need to control the vehicle at all, and the chance to fill our cars’ screens with pure entertainment. Weekend readingA greener energy industry is testing investors’ ability to adapt. One coal CEO says “make money while you can” in an industry that is in terminal decline. The venture capital arm of Royal Dutch Shell Plc has invested in Corvus Energy, a maritime and offshore battery systems company. America’s obsession with beef is killing leather. A look at how Phoenix comes alive at night, and how other cities might too in a hotter world. An exploration of how extreme climate change has arrived in America. The Anthropocene is a joke. On a geological time scale, human civilization is an event, not an epoch. Three years of misery inside Google, the happiest company in tech. Here’s what happens when Apple Inc. locks you out of its walled garden after fraud suspicions. Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks. When Midwest startups sell, their hometown schools often lose. A programmer in California got a “NULL” vanity license plate in the hopes that the word would not compute in a database of traffic offenders. Instead, he was fined $12,049. Robert Ballard, discoverer of the Titanic, is exploring a startling clue that may help him find Amelia Earhart’s plane.   Bugatti’s one-off La Voiture Noire debuted at the Pebble Beach Concours D’Elegance. It’s already been sold, for $18.68 million. Bloomberg Businessweek’s Peter Coy looks back on the 40 years since the magazine declared “ the death of equities.” Get Sparklines delivered to your inbox. Sign up here. And subscribe to Bloomberg All Access and get much, much more. You’ll receive our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, the Bloomberg Open and the Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Nathaniel Bullard at nbullard@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nathaniel Bullard is a BloombergNEF energy analyst, covering technology and business model innovation and system-wide resource transitions.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple looks to Hudson Yards and One Madison Ave. for new office space
    American City Business Journals

    Apple looks to Hudson Yards and One Madison Ave. for new office space

    The landmarked James A. Farley Post Office, currently being redeveloped, is also a possibility, according to The Real Deal.

  • Friday Apple Rumors: Japan Display May Supply OLED for Watch Series 5
    InvestorPlace

    Friday Apple Rumors: Japan Display May Supply OLED for Watch Series 5

    Leading the Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) rumor mill today is news of the Watch Series 5. Today, we'll look at that and other Apple Rumors for Friday.Source: Anna Hoychuk / Shutterstock.com Watch Series 5: A new rumor claims that Japan Display is going to supply OLED screens for the next Watch, reports MacRumors. This rumor says that the Apple Watch Series 5 will feature displays from the Japanese company. However, it also notes that LG will also be supplying some of the OLED panels for the wearable. If these rumors are true, then it looks like AAPL is looking to spread out its supply chain some.iPhone 11 Display: Rumor has it that Apple is going to use a Samsung OLED screen for the iPhone 11, BGR notes. This rumor claims that it will be the same display that is in the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy Note 10. AAPL getting displays from Samsung isn't new, but using the same displays as a competing device is. Typically, the company has its own custom displays for its devices. The rumor points out that two smartphones in the iPhone 11 line will make use of OLED screens.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsHomePod Japan: Apple is preparing to finally bring the HomePod to Japan, reports 9to5Mac. The HomePod will officially be available in Japan starting on August 23. However, customers that want to guarantee they get one can preorder starting today. It will cost 32,800 yen, which is about the same as its $299 price in the U.S. The launch in Japan comes two years after the HomePod made its debut in the U.S.Subscribe to Apple Rumors As of this writing, William White did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities.The post Friday Apple Rumors: Japan Display May Supply OLED for Watch Series 5 appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Apple Watch Drives Wearables Surge in North America in Q2
    Motley Fool

    Apple Watch Drives Wearables Surge in North America in Q2

    Total wearables shipments jumped 38% to 7.7 million.

  • AirPods, Smartwatches Are 'Moving The Needle' For Apple
    Investor's Business Daily

    AirPods, Smartwatches Are 'Moving The Needle' For Apple

    While some Apple investors fret about declining iPhone sales, wearables are beginning to pick up the slack. One Wall Street analyst sees big opportunities for AirPods and the Apple Watch.