^DJI - Dow Jones Industrial Average

DJI - DJI Real Time Price. Currency in USD
29,398.08
-25.22 (-0.09%)
At close: 5:06PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close29,423.30
Open29,440.50
Volume232,546,894
Day's Range29,283.20 - 29,463.00
52 Week Range24,680.57 - 29,568.57
Avg. Volume266,042,622
  • Barrons.com

    The Stock Market Is Up About 5% Through Presidents Day. Here’s What Happens Next.

    Can history point out hidden risks for the stock market or is it clear sailing from here? As it turns out, the data is encouraging.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Walmart Earnings Due, 3 IPOs Near Buys; Warren Buffett Stock Set To Break Out
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Walmart Earnings Due, 3 IPOs Near Buys; Warren Buffett Stock Set To Break Out

    Futures: Walmart, Medtronic and InMode earnings are due Tuesday. IPO stocks InMode, Progyny, Ping are near buy points. So is Taiwan Semiconductor. Buffett-boosted RH is likely to break out.

  • Here’s which markets are open, and closed, this Presidents Day
    MarketWatch

    Here’s which markets are open, and closed, this Presidents Day

    U.S. financial markets are closed on Monday, Feb. 17, in observance of Presidents Day. The New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq are shut down, and the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, or Sifma, is recommending no trading in dollar-denominated debt, which includes money markets and U.S. Treasurys. The S&P 500 (SPX)and Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA)were both less than a percentage point away from their respective record closes on Friday, while the 10-year Treasury note yield (BX:TMUBMUSD10Y)traded around 1.59% at last check.

  • Barrons.com

    Stimulus Moves by China Nudge Global Stocks Higher

    Moves by China’s government to limit the fallout of the deadly coronavirus helped boost stock markets globally on Monday.

  • Bloomberg

    David Ruder, SEC Chairman During 1987 Crash, Dies at 90

    (Bloomberg) -- David Ruder, a former chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission whose off-the-cuff comments may have fanned panic selling on what became known as Black Monday, has died. He was 90.He died on Feb. 15, according to Northwestern University, where he served as dean of the law school from 1977 to 1985. No cause was given. Jay Clayton, the current SEC chairman, said in a statement on Twitter that Ruder was “a great chairman and constant contributor to the SEC for over 30 years.”As head of the SEC from August 1987 through September 1989, Ruder presided over the final phase of the agency’s insider-trading investigation of Ivan Boesky, Michael Milken and Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. He also steered the agency away from the anti-regulatory course it had taken during Ronald Reagan’s first six years as president.A longtime professor of corporate and securities law at Northwestern, Ruder was Reagan’s pick to succeed John S.R. Shad, a former vice chairman of E.F. Hutton & Co. who had led the SEC from 1981.Ruder was in his third month as SEC chairman when markets around the world plunged on Oct. 19, 1987. The Dow Jones Industrial Average would end the day down 22.6%, having lost 508 points.That morning, Ruder delivered remarks to a conference of the American Stock Exchange in Washington. Afterward, he met with reporters seeking his reaction to what was happening in equity markets.‘Quite Anxious’“I’m afraid to say that there is some point, and I don’t know what that point is, that I would be quite anxious to talk to the New York Stock Exchange about a temporary, and very temporary, halt of trading,” he replied in part, according to an Associated Press account.Dow Jones, the first news service to report his comment, at 1:09 p.m, rendered it slightly differently: “There is some point, and I don’t know what that point is, that I would be interested in talking to the New York Stock Exchange about a temporary, very temporary, halt in trading.”There would be no such halt, and Ruder was criticized for mentioning it as a possibility, which may have caused nervous investors to believe they had to race to sell shares before the market closed.“By 1:25 p.m., the Dow Jones news wire quoted the SEC as stating that it was not discussing closing the stock markets,” the presidential task force that investigated the market crash wrote in its final report. “However, the uncertainty created by the possible inability to sell may have exacerbated the dramatic selling pressure.”At a hearing three weeks after the crash, Senator William Proxmire, a Wisconsin Democrat who led the Senate Banking Committee, asked Ruder whether it would have been wiser not to talk publicly about a halt to trading.Defining MomentAccording to a Washington Post account of the hearing, Ruder explained that when he spoke to reporters on Oct. 19, he “did not have in my consciousness what sort of day it would be.”Ruder told the New York Times in January 1988: “You want to deny that you caused the market to drop. You want to defend yourself. But the proper response would be to say that I made a mistake talking about the market and I would not do it again.”Arthur Levitt, who was chairman of the American Stock Exchange at the time and later would serve as SEC chairman, said of Ruder: “It’s funny how one event can mark a chairman. It’s unfortunate, because he was a very solid chairman, very thoughtful, very balanced. He came out for the right things.” Levitt is a board member of Bloomberg LP, the parent of Bloomberg News.Under Ruder, the SEC studied what happened to stocks, options and futures throughout the tumultuous month of October 1987. It identified how “new institutional trading mechanisms and strategies in this linked market can cause extraordinary peak volume and volatility,” Ruder said in a 1988 speech.Lacked ResourcesThroughout his term at the SEC, and for years after, Ruder urged that the agency be given more money and authority.He failed in a bid to wrest authority over commodity-index futures from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. In 2008, he joined with two other former SEC chairmen, Levitt and William Donaldson, to caution against weakening the SEC while reforming financial regulation following the housing and credit crisis.“The problem with the SEC today is that it lacks the money, manpower and tools to do its job,” they wrote.David Sturtevant Ruder was born on May 25, 1929, in Wausau, Wisconsin, the son of an attorney. He graduated from Williams College in 1951 and, after service in the U.S. Army, earned his law degree in 1957 from the University of Wisconsin.After practicing law in Milwaukee for four years, he became a professor at Northwestern’s law school, known today as Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. During his time as dean, the law school attracted a pool of highly talented professors and built a $25 million building.Reagan’s AgendaThe SEC chairman’s post opened up when Shad became U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands. Reagan, hoping to keep the agency focused on enforcement matters, reportedly offered the job first to Rudolph Giuliani, who was then the U.S. attorney in Manhattan, and then to Nicholas Brady, chief executive of the investment firm Dillon Read & Co. They turned it down.Ruder didn’t fully share the president’s zeal for deregulation, especially after the market crash early in his tenure.“I definitely believe that I am more regulatory than my predecessor,” Ruder told the Times in January 1988. “I find myself voting more clearly for intervention by the commission into all kinds of activities, particularly in the enforcement area.”Ruder called the SEC, with its $135 million budget, “a peanut agency, in terms of budget size, doing a giant’s job,” during a congressional hearing in September 1988.That same month, the SEC sued Drexel and four of its officials, including Milken, for insider trading and stock manipulation, following a long-running investigation that had begun under Shad. In a settlement with the SEC and the Justice Department, the firm agreed to pay $650 million in fines and to remove Milken as head of its junk-bond unit. Milken would serve two years in prison; Drexel filed for Chapter 11 protection in February 1990.Ruder stepped aside in 1989, making room for Richard Breeden, President George H.W. Bush’s pick to lead the SEC. Ruder returned to Northwestern, where he became a professor emeritus in 2005. From 1999 to 2010 he led the Mutual Fund Directors Forum, which represents independent fund directors.Ruder was married three times and had four children and two stepchildren.(Adds date of death and attribution in second paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Laurence Arnold in Washington at larnold4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Caroline Salas Gage at csalas1@bloomberg.net, Steven Gittelson, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Week Ahead:  “Covid-19, And The  ‘Cleanest Dirty Shirt’ Argument”
    FX Empire

    Week Ahead: “Covid-19, And The ‘Cleanest Dirty Shirt’ Argument”

    Investors took solace in robust economic data, better-than-expected earning reports and the fact a quorum of the global central banks have the markets back which we will highlight in the Asia Week Ahead section.

  • Two years after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — who are the winners and the losers?
    MarketWatch

    Two years after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — who are the winners and the losers?

    With tax filing season now underway, we have two full years of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) changes in the rearview mirror: 2018 and 2019. Not surprisingly, the answers depend on your specific situation and, just as importantly, your perceptions. Perceptions often override reality.

  • The Week Ahead – Economic Data, COVID-19 Updates and Geopolitics in Focus
    FX Empire

    The Week Ahead – Economic Data, COVID-19 Updates and Geopolitics in Focus

    It’s a busy week ahead, with private sector PMI numbers likely to reflect the impact of COVID-19 on economies. Falling cases should soften the blow, however.

  • Here are vulnerable parts of the U.S. economy that coronavirus may infect
    MarketWatch

    Here are vulnerable parts of the U.S. economy that coronavirus may infect

    Festering worries about the spread of COVID-19 is a potential peril for the U.S. economy, but ailing manufacturers and tepid investment are already muzzling growth.

  • Here’s the segment of the economy that may benefit from fears of coronavirus, analysts say
    MarketWatch

    Here’s the segment of the economy that may benefit from fears of coronavirus, analysts say

    As the COVID-19 spreads and the patient count and death toll grow, economists are slashing their once-rosy expectations for global growth in 2020.

  • Here’s how one ‘black swan’ investor is protecting his $5 billion fund against a market crash that ‘won’t be pretty’
    MarketWatch

    Here’s how one ‘black swan’ investor is protecting his $5 billion fund against a market crash that ‘won’t be pretty’

    Mark Spitznagel of Universa Investments is getting ready for the next big drop, but he says he’s fine if it never comes.

  • Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger warns of ‘wretched excess,’ says Tesla’s Elon Musk ‘may overestimate himself’
    MarketWatch

    Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger warns of ‘wretched excess,’ says Tesla’s Elon Musk ‘may overestimate himself’

    Munger, who serves as chairman for the Daily Journal along with his Berkshire role, cited the increasing use of EBITDA — earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization — as an example of that excess. “I don’t like when investment bankers talk about EBITDA, which I call ‘bulls**t earnings,’” Munger, 96 years old, explained.

  • Trump administration considers proposing new tax incentives for stock buying: report
    MarketWatch

    Trump administration considers proposing new tax incentives for stock buying: report

    The Trump administration is considering making it possible for Americans to invest more in the stock market on a tax-free basis, according to a report on Friday citing four unnamed administration officials.

  • Visa, UnitedHealth, Fiserv, TransDigm, Monolithic Power: Give These 5 Leaders A Long Look
    Investor's Business Daily

    Visa, UnitedHealth, Fiserv, TransDigm, Monolithic Power: Give These 5 Leaders A Long Look

    Long-Term Leaders stabilize your portfolio and offer stellar long-term growth. Visa, UnitedHealth, Fiserv, TransDigm and Monolithic Power are setting up.

  • Barrons.com

    How Netflix Wins Despite Underperforming at the Oscars

    The streaming giant had 25 nominations and only two wins at the Academy Award. But the stock price went up. The reason: Lots of chatter about the company’s content.

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average Gained 1% This Week. Let It Ride?

    We’ve heard the market dubbed “ludicrous.” We’ve seen the comparisons to the dot-com bubble. We’ve pointed out that stocks have almost never traded with valuations as high as they are now. That’s still no reason to sell.

  • Delta’s CEO offers a simple solution to the raging debate over reclining seats on airplanes
    MarketWatch

    Delta’s CEO offers a simple solution to the raging debate over reclining seats on airplanes

    Delta Air Lines Inc. Chief Executive Officer Ed Bastian weighs in on a simmering debate about the proper protocol when reclining one’s seat on a flight.

  • MarketWatch

    S&P 500 and Nasdaq end week at records as investors weigh economic health, coronavirus

    The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq on Friday closed at an all-time high, capping a week that had produced a decided uptrend as investors parsed a round of corporate results, economic data and the spread of COVID-19. All three benchmarks, however finished the week solidly higher. The S&P 500 gained 6.22 points, 0.2%, to close at 3,380.16, a record. The Nasdaq Composite Index closed 19.21 points, 0.2%, also at a record at 9,731.18. Meanwhile, the Dow Jones Industrial Average finished 25.23 points, or 0.1%, down to end at 29,398.08. On the day, investors weighed slightly sluggish retail-sales growth in January against relatively upbeat corporate earnings, even as companies like Expedia warned on the impact of the viral outbreak that reportedly originated in Wuhan, China last year. For the week, the Dow gained 1%, the S&P 500 was up 1.6%, and the Nasdaq gained 2.2%.

  • S&P 500 and Nasdaq end at records to end week, amid signs of soft retail sales, coronavirus spread
    MarketWatch

    S&P 500 and Nasdaq end at records to end week, amid signs of soft retail sales, coronavirus spread

    The Nasdaq and S&P 500 finish at records Friday, after bouncing between small gains and losses, as investors parse mixed data on the strength of the U.S. consumer and monitored the spread of COVID-19 in China.

  • Stocks Close Mainly Higher After Late Rally; 3 Breakouts To Ponder
    Investor's Business Daily

    Stocks Close Mainly Higher After Late Rally; 3 Breakouts To Ponder

    The stock market closed mixed after buyers made a sweep of trading desks in the final 45 minutes of trading. Indexes closed with gains for the week and near all-time highs.

  • Barrons.com

    Kraft Heinz Stockholders Find Good News Can Be Bad News

    Fitch downgraded Kraft Heinz's long-term debt to junk status on Friday morning. The bond-rating company would prefer that the food-productst company use more of its cash to repay debt, and less on dividends.

  • Here’s a reminder that ‘when the dollar moves, things break’ — and vice versa
    MarketWatch

    Here’s a reminder that ‘when the dollar moves, things break’ — and vice versa

    CURRENCIES The U.S. dollar just spent another week flexing its muscles. While that hasn’t done much to derail upside momentum for the stock market so far, it’s worth remembering that big moves by the word’s reserve currency can send ripples through global financial markets.

  • Barrons.com

    Tesla Stock Just Had the Ride of Its Life. Why Bitcoin Could Be Next.

    Bitcoin has tiptoed back above $10,000, from $4,000 a year ago, and I have two questions. Last spring, I wrote that conditions are perfect for a flight to nonsense, with growth scarce and the Federal Reserve again cutting interest rates, and that Bitcoin would be the bellwether. U.S. stock indexes have shot higher since then, which I wouldn’t call a bubble or meltup just yet.

  • E-mini Dow Jones Industrial Average (YM) Futures Technical Analysis – Close Under 29385 Signals Weakness
    FX Empire

    E-mini Dow Jones Industrial Average (YM) Futures Technical Analysis – Close Under 29385 Signals Weakness

    Based on Friday’s price action and the current price at 29309, the direction of the March E-mini Dow Jones Industrial Average into the close will be determined by trader reaction to the steep uptrending Gann angle at 29385.

  • Consumer electronics factory reopens in China after coronavirus shutdown
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Consumer electronics factory reopens in China after coronavirus shutdown

    Agilian Technology is reopening one of its three factories in China after an extended period of shutdown due to the coronavirus outbreak. Its executive vice president Renaud Anjoran joins Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith on The Ticker to discuss.