^IXIC - NASDAQ Composite

Nasdaq GIDS - Nasdaq GIDS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
8,734.88
+17.56 (+0.20%)
At close: 5:15PM EST
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Previous Close8,717.32
Open8,713.91
Volume1967871153
Day's Range8,697.58 - 8,768.87
52 Week Range6,190.17 - 8,768.87
Avg. Volume2,024,911,111
  • Dow Jones Futures: After China Trade Deal, Which Sectors Will Lead Stock Market Rally?
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: After China Trade Deal, Which Sectors Will Lead Stock Market Rally?

    Futures: The China trade deal is good news for the stock market rally. But which groups will join Apple, and chip stocks like AMD as market leaders?

  • There’s only one thing ‘scared to death’ investors need to know about where this bull market is headed, strategist says
    MarketWatch

    There’s only one thing ‘scared to death’ investors need to know about where this bull market is headed, strategist says

    Even with stocks continuing to dance around record territory, investors aren’t just cautious, they’re “scared to death” of what’s next, and that’s great news for those hoping to keep riding this aging bull market well into 2020, according to Jeff Saut, chief investment strategist at Capital Wealth Planning.

  • Global Markets: Asian shares jump on 'phase one' Sino-U.S. trade deal
    Reuters

    Global Markets: Asian shares jump on 'phase one' Sino-U.S. trade deal

    Asian shares hit their highest in nearly eight months on Monday after the United States and China agreed on a preliminary trade deal, with Australian shares leading the way on expectations of more easing of monetary policy there. European shares were set to build on the previous week's gains. U.S. stock futures also pointed to stronger gains to start the week, with the S&P 500 e-minis up 0.27%.

  • Asian shares jump on 'phase one' Sino-U.S. trade deal
    Reuters

    Asian shares jump on 'phase one' Sino-U.S. trade deal

    Asian shares hit their highest in nearly eight months on Monday after the United States and China agreed on a preliminary trade deal, with Australian shares leading the way on expectations of more easing of monetary policy there. European shares were set to build on the previous week's gains. U.S. stock futures also pointed to stronger gains to start the week, with the S&P 500 e-minis up 0.27%.

  • Barrons.com

    Lots Went Right for Investors Last Week. The Dow Still Ended Friday on a Flat Note.

    From accommodative central banks to Brexit clarity, much went investors’ way this past week. Still, U.S. stocks finished only slightly higher on the week.

  • China welcomes preliminary deal in trade war it blames on US
    MarketWatch

    China welcomes preliminary deal in trade war it blames on US

    China expressed cautious optimism Saturday about a first-step trade agreement that dials down a trade war it blames the U.S. for starting.

  • Why President Trump’s constant cheerleading of the stock market might not help him much come election time
    MarketWatch

    Why President Trump’s constant cheerleading of the stock market might not help him much come election time

    A recent poll of likely voters shows 61% of Americans said that the market’s rally has had little or no impact on their finances.

  • Here’s what JP Morgan thinks are among the top trades for next year
    MarketWatch

    Here’s what JP Morgan thinks are among the top trades for next year

    Buy equities, add U.S. agriculture and hedge against the 2020 U.S. presidential election — three of JP Morgan’s top trade picks for the year ahead.

  • Why Wall Street’s most bullish strategist says his S&P 500 forecast is probably too low
    MarketWatch

    Why Wall Street’s most bullish strategist says his S&P 500 forecast is probably too low

    Our call of the day from BTIG’s top strategist says his bullish S&P 500 forecast may turn out to be way too conservative, especially if trade negotiations smooth out.

  • The stock market will ‘breathe a sigh of relief’ if President Trump is re-elected in 2020, says billionaire Howard Marks
    MarketWatch

    The stock market will ‘breathe a sigh of relief’ if President Trump is re-elected in 2020, says billionaire Howard Marks

    Howard Marks, co-founder of Oaktree Capital Management, who has made billions investing in distressed debt, says that a 2020 election victory likely would be a major relief for Wall Street investors.

  • Own stocks, thank the Fed and don’t expect the next U.S. recession to start anytime soon, says BCA Research
    MarketWatch

    Own stocks, thank the Fed and don’t expect the next U.S. recession to start anytime soon, says BCA Research

    U.S. economy may chug along for another two years without a blip thanks to the Federal Reserve’s low rates, which makes it a good time to own stocks, say analysts at BCA Research.

  • This is how dangerous ‘dollar-cost ravaging’ can be for your retirement
    MarketWatch

    This is how dangerous ‘dollar-cost ravaging’ can be for your retirement

    Dollar-cost averaging is a popular strategy in which an investor purchases an asset at regularly timed intervals to mitigate the risk of buying high. But what about “dollar-cost ravaging?”

  • Barrons.com

    We Have a Trade Deal and Brexit Clarity. That’s Good News for Stocks.

    The tentative phase one U.S.-China deal, plus the vote ensuring that Britain will leave the European Union, add clarity for investors, who bid up shares. Also, a tidal wave of debt threatens frackers.

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Added 3 Points Because a China Trade Deal Is So Yesterday

    All three major stock indexes closed with minor gains on Friday after Thursday’s rally. A “phase one” trade deal between the U.S. and China has finally arrived. The U.K., after the election, will likely leave the European Union.

  • Defining a 'hot' labor market: Yahoo U
    Yahoo Finance

    Defining a 'hot' labor market: Yahoo U

    Fed Chairman Jerome Powell described the U.S. labor market as "strong" but not "tight," admitting that the labor market is not as close to maximum employment as it once thought.

  • Trump announces phase-one China trade deal and scraps Dec. 15 tariffs
    MarketWatch

    Trump announces phase-one China trade deal and scraps Dec. 15 tariffs

    President Donald Trump announces a phase-one trade deal with China on Friday, saying Beijing had agreed to purchases of U.S. goods and will avoid tariffs that had been set to go into place on Sunday.

  • S&P 500, Nasdaq eke out new records in wake of U.S.-China trade pact
    MarketWatch

    S&P 500, Nasdaq eke out new records in wake of U.S.-China trade pact

    U.S. stocks closed slightly higher Friday after President Donald Trump and Chinese officials announced a trade pact that includes a rollback of some tariffs, the scrapping of further duties originally set for Sunday, and promises of targeted U.S. agricultural purchases by China.

  • Stock Market Live Updates: Stocks end little changed, lashed by Brexit and US-China trade
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock Market Live Updates: Stocks end little changed, lashed by Brexit and US-China trade

    Headlines moving the stock market in real time.

  • MarketWatch

    S&P 500, Nasdaq notch records to end the week as market weighs merits of limited China trade-deal

    The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite finished the week at records Friday but enthusiasm over an announced China-U.S. partial trade deal, which had sparked buying Thursday, faded as investors weighed aspects of the so-called phase-one pact. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up about 0.01% at 28,135, missing a record close at 28,164, while the S&P 500 index advanced less than 0.01% to 3,169, enough for a fresh all time high. The Nasdaq Composite Index closed up 0.2% to end at 8,735, marking its second straight all-time closing peak. For the week, the Dow gained 0.4%, the S&P 500 returned 0.7%, while the technology-laden Nasdaq gained 0.9% for the five-day period. Underpinning the week's advance was the easing of fears --at least temporarily--surrounding two of the biggest points of friction for stock-market investors: U.K. elections and trade tensions. The U.S. and China announced a limited agreement Friday to halt the trade war, eliminating tariffs that were set to go into effect Sunday; but some critics worry that the phase-one deal may not accomplish as much to alleviate future trade tensions as had been expected--a point that some say doesn't entirely help business leaders make strategic plans. Meanwhile, a resounding election victory for Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservative Party raised hopes for a quick divorce from the European Union. In corporate news, shares of Live Nation Entertainment Inc tumbled after the Wall Street Journal reported that the Justice Department was preparing to take legal action against the company, alleging that it sought to strong-arm concert venues into using its dominant Ticketmaster subsidiary.

  • Stock market news: December 13, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: December 13, 2019

    U.S. stocks fluctuated between gains and losses as investors struggled to square up terms of a phase one trade deal as described separately by Chinese and U.S. officials. The Dow swung between an as much as 158 point gain and 60 point loss during Friday’s session.

  • Stock Market 2020: JPMorgan sees the S&P climbing to 3,400
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock Market 2020: JPMorgan sees the S&P climbing to 3,400

    With the end of the year and the decade fast-approaching, Wall Street strategists have begun to deliver their expectations about where the stock market will close out 2020.

  • Stocks Erase Losses As China Trade War Headlines Dominate Trading
    Investor's Business Daily

    Stocks Erase Losses As China Trade War Headlines Dominate Trading

    Stocks erased losses and the Nasdaq composite outperformed Friday as the stock market gyrated on sometimes conflicting headlines on the China trade war.

  • Barrons.com

    Stocks Go Flat Even Though the U.S. and China Reached a Trade Deal

    The three major U.S. stock market indexes fell, then rose, then dropped again as some details of an initial trade deal between the U.S. and China were unveiled in tumultuous fashion.

  • These 3 charts hint the stock market rally will continue now that there's a US-China phase one trade deal
    Yahoo Finance

    These 3 charts hint the stock market rally will continue now that there's a US-China phase one trade deal

    Will the stock market rally continue following President Trump reaching a phase one trade deal with China? These three charts suggest yes.

  • Christmas Comes Early for Markets as Key Risks Get Taken Out
    Bloomberg

    Christmas Comes Early for Markets as Key Risks Get Taken Out

    (Bloomberg) -- It started last Friday, with a blowout U.S. jobs report that beat all expectations. Then in quick succession late Thursday investors got news that the guns will be holstered in the U.S.-China trade war, and that Britain is lifting itself out of the quagmire of a hung parliament.Suddenly, all the worries about a global recession, yet another wave of tariff hikes between the world’s two largest economies and a messy U.K. breakup with the European Union are fading from view. It may be Friday the 13th, but those who made an early start on JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s call for risk-on trades in 2020 can count themselves lucky.The S&P 500 Index and Nasdaq Composite logged record closes Thursday, helping push MSCI’s all-country world gauge to its first all-time high since the eve of the global rout in January 2018, back when a stocks “melt-up” was the narrative of the day. In currencies, the yen fell and the yuan soared. Bond yields climbed, with 10-year Treasuries around 1.9% and their Japanese counterparts in recent days straddling 0% for the first time since March.The moves came on news that President Donald Trump signed off on a phase-one deal with China that averts the Dec. 15 introduction of another wave of U.S. tariffs. The S&P 500 swung between gains and losses in Friday trading, as neither side delivered sufficient details to assuage investors trade issues have been fully resolved. In the U.K., Prime Minister Boris Johnson cruised to a big majority, an election result that should guarantee passage of his Brexit deal with the EU.“The good news just seems to keep coming for markets,” said Kerry Craig, a Melbourne-based global market strategist at JPMorgan Asset Management. “Investors will be delighted to check their stockings and realize they won’t be receiving the lump of coal” they got last year, when global equities tumbled in the fourth quarter.In a stark contrast to the liquidity crunch of late 2018, the Federal Reserve has been a major ally for those bullish on risk this year-end. The U.S. central bank started injecting liquidity in October at a pace of $60 billion of T-bill purchases a month, and Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday if needed the initiative could adjust to buying coupon-paying securities as well.Bets on the Fed have shifted as risks eased over the past week. Futures trading suggests just a 69% chance of an interest-rate cut in 2020. Thursday last week, one cut was fully priced in, with a 13% chance of another one by the end of next year.The ground is shifting for others, too. As recently as a month back, the Bank of Japan was seen by some as needing to head deeper into negative territory with its policy rate. But now, with the yen weakening past 109 per dollar and Japan’s government embracing a fiscal-stimulus package, things look different.“We’re perhaps seeing the start of a strong yen decline -- Trump’s tweet, the Brexit results have flipped the yen on its head,” said Vishnu Varathan, head of economics & strategy at Mizuho Bank Ltd. in Singapore. “We could see haven demand wane into 2020. There might be even a last hurrah before the year-end as risk bulls get their way, and push the yen lower from here.”Bringing hope to both Japanese institutional investors and those the world over is the reduction in the pool of negative-yielding bonds. It shrank to $11.5 trillion as of Thursday, down from the record $17 trillion hit in August when the trade war was raging.How long the Christmas-time cheer will last remains a question. On three of the key risks, doubts remain. Brave is the analyst that predicts smooth sailing in the U.S.-China relationship ahead; no American presidential candidate is running on the “be nice to China” ticket. Johnson’s looming majority may guarantee the U.K. leaves the EU in January, but the two will still need to negotiate a trade deal, meaning the “hard Brexit” scenario could yet be on the horizon.As for global recession risks, while the consensus is that growth will pick up in 2020 thanks to this year’s monetary easing and moves in a number of countries to embrace fiscal stimulus, that view isn’t universal. In Australia, an economy closely tied to demand for important inputs including coal and iron, asset managers even see the central bank adopting quantitative easing next year.And some warn that the U.S. presidential-election season, set to kick into high gear next month in the leadup to the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses, could pose dangers. The populist platform from onetime front-runner Senator Elizabeth Warren has triggered warnings about the record-setting U.S. bull market for equities coming to an end.Even if all the good news stays intact, there’s the challenge of valuations. How much gas is there left in the tank after the S&P 500 soared 26% plus in 2019? In credit, U.S. spreads are also historically low.“I wish we had kept some of the good news for 2020,” Mark Matthews, head of research Asia at Bank Julius Baer & Co., said on Bloomberg TV. “What this is going to do is cause a really powerful rally into the year end, so what’s going to be left over to get priced in to 2020?”The plethora of riches this week includes Republicans and Democrats getting a bipartisan deal to fund the government before the Dec. 20 spending deadline. Meantime, investors have shrugged off the Trump impeachment story, confident that the Republican majority in the Senate means he’ll remain in office.For emerging markets, a newly solid Chinese yuan and a retreat in the dollar to the weakest since July offers encouragement. A weakening yuan that dragged developing nations’ currencies down with it had made dollar debt more expensive to service. The yuan Friday traded past the 7-per-dollar line that had briefly spooked markets earlier this year.“It feels like all the bricks in the wall of worry are falling at once,” said Peter Atwater, president of Financial Insyghts.(Updates with latest trade development)\--With assistance from Garfield Reynolds, Cormac Mullen, Gregor Stuart Hunter, Tracy Alloway, Ruth Carson and Matthew Burgess.To contact the reporter on this story: Christopher Anstey in Tokyo at canstey@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.