^TNX - Treasury Yield 10 Years

NYBOT - NYBOT Real Time Price. Currency in USD
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+0.0450 (+2.50%)
As of 2:59PM EST. Market open.
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Previous Close1.7970
Open1.7950
Volume0
Day's Range1.7900 - 1.8640
52 Week Range1.4290 - 2.9190
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  • MarketWatch

    U.S. government bond yields higher after big gains in new jobs

    U.S. Treasury yields are trading higher Friday after data from the Labor Department showed the U.S. created 266,000 new jobs in November, more than expected and the biggest gain since January.

  • U.S. sees hiring surge in November as economy adds 266,000 new jobs
    MarketWatch

    U.S. sees hiring surge in November as economy adds 266,000 new jobs

    The economy produced a robust 266,000 new jobs in November and the unemployment rate returned to a 50-year low, reflecting the resilience of a rock-solid U.S. labor market.

  • Even Skeptics Can’t Ignore These Jobs Numbers
    Bloomberg

    Even Skeptics Can’t Ignore These Jobs Numbers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One of the most popular talking points in markets lately has been that the U.S. jobs report, long seen as a crucial indicator of the broader health of the economy, is actually not as important as it’s made out to be. Instead, it’s all about inflation, or central banks providing liquidity, or the latest news about striking a trade deal.For one day at least, it was all about jobs data again for bond traders.In what could only be described as blockbuster numbers, payrolls surged by 266,000, the most since January and beating all estimates in a Bloomberg survey calling for a 180,000 gain, according to a Labor Department report Friday. On top of that, the prior month’s advance was revised upward by 28,000, to 156,000. Average hourly earnings rose 3.1% from a year ago, topping expectations for 3% growth. The unemployment rate dipped to 3.5%, rather than sticking at 3.6% as analysts anticipated. Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields soared almost 8 basis points in a flash, climbing to 1.86%, the highest since mid-November. It was the biggest instant reaction to payrolls data the market has experienced all year. The only somewhat comparable move was on July 5, when yields ended the trading session 10 basis points higher, after a relatively small increase at first. But even then, when job gains trounced estimates by 64,000, the previous month’s figures were revised lower, the unemployment rate unexpectedly increased and wage growth fell short. It wasn’t across-the-board strength like these November numbers.The data was so good, in fact, that futures traders have finally started to believe that the Federal Reserve will truly hold interest rates steady next year. Fed funds futures are now only pricing in 23 basis points of easing for all of 2020, or less than one typical quarter-point cut. These numbers should calm any fears of an impending recession, and with it another yield-curve inversion.Given that the hurdle for the central bank to raise interest rates again is so high, traders will probably hesitate to whittle those wagers down much further. But it should simplify Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s message to investors at his Dec. 11 press conference: Monetary policy is in a good place and the central bank will be patient from here to see if inflation picks up. And the economy? It’s definitely in a good place — the latest payrolls report proves it.To contact the author of this story: Brian Chappatta at bchappatta1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brian Chappatta is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering debt markets. He previously covered bonds for Bloomberg News. He is also a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    Markets In 'Goldilocks' Mode Amid Strong Job Gains, Steady Wage Gains

    November turned into an employment bonanza, helped in part by the return of workers from a strike at General Motors Company (NYSE: GM). If you add the Labor Department’s upward revisions of a combined 41,000 jobs for September and October to this impressive November tally, new jobs growth has averaged a very healthy 205,000 the last three months and 180,000 for the year to date. Not too shabby for an economy that many analysts say is in the last stages of a growth phase.

  • ‘That’s a lot of jobs!’ economists exclaim after strong payrolls report
    MarketWatch

    ‘That’s a lot of jobs!’ economists exclaim after strong payrolls report

    Economists called November’s payrolls report a “blowout,” citing the higher-than-expected 266,000 jobs created in the month and said it should silence near-term recession “Grinches.”

  • MarketWatch

    Treasury yields jump after Friday jobs report shows that U.S. added 266,000 jobs in November

    U.S. Treasury yields Friday morning popped higher across the board after a key employment report showed the U.S. created a hotter-than-expected 266,000 new jobs in November, marking the biggest gain since the first month of the year. The 10-year Treasury note rose 5.5 basis points to 1.850%, the 2-year Treasury note added 5.5 basis points to 1.637%, while the 30-year Treasury bond added 3.8 basis points to 2.284%. The increase in new jobs easily topped the 180,000 MarketWatch forecast, helped by the end of an auto-workers strike at General Motors Co. . That added roughly 50,000 jobs to the payrolls number. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate slipped to 3.5% from 3.6% and matched a 50-year low. The average wage paid to American workers rose 7 cents, or 0.2%, to $28.29 an hour. The 12-month rate of hourly wage gains slipped to 3.1% from 3.2%.

  • MarketWatch

    U.S. government bond yields end mostly flat as market awaits jobs report

    The benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury yield inched slightly higher Thursday following on upbeat weekly employment data, but all eyes are on Friday’s nonfarm-payroll report for more insights on the state of the domestic economy

  • U.S. jobless claims tumble again to 203,000 and return to near a 50-year low
    MarketWatch

    U.S. jobless claims tumble again to 203,000 and return to near a 50-year low

    The number of Americans who applied for unemployment benefits at the end of November fell to the lowest level in seven months and returned to close to a 50-year low, but the sharp decline in jobless claims likely stems in part from the Thanksgiving holiday.

  • U.S. trade deficit falls 7.6% in October to 16-month low on decline in Chinese imports
    MarketWatch

    U.S. trade deficit falls 7.6% in October to 16-month low on decline in Chinese imports

    The nation’s trade deficit dropped almost 8% in October to a 16-month low, largely because of lower imports from China tied to the ongoing U.S. trade dispute with the Asian giant. The deficit slid to $47.2 billion from $51.1 billion.

  • MarketWatch

    U.S. factory orders rise in October

    Factory orders rose 0.3% in October, the Commerce Department said Thursday. This is the first gain in three months. Orders in September were revised to a 0.8% drop compared with the previous estimate of a 0.6% fall. Economists were expecting a 0.2% rise. Durable goods orders rose a revised 0.5%, down slightly from last week's initial estimate of a 0.6% rise. Orders for nondurable goods were flat in the month. T.J. Connelly, head of research at Contingent Macro, noted that the growth rate in factory orders is down 1.2% year-over-year. "Overall, the factory sector showed only hints of stabilization amid a continued downtrend," Connelly said, in a note to clients.

  • Graphic: Gazing into the recession crystal ball
    Reuters

    Graphic: Gazing into the recession crystal ball

    The protracted trade war between China and the United States and a deteriorating global growth outlook have left investors nervous that the longest expansion in American history is at risk of ending. Recession fears were sparked earlier this year when the yield curve inverted - a key indicator of a pending downturn. An inverted yield curve occurs when yields on short-term bonds are higher than those on long-term bonds, a sign investors are so worried about the future that they are willing to hold long-term bonds, which are usually viewed as a safer alternative to stocks and other investments, even when the payouts are low.

  • Gazing into the recession crystal ball
    Reuters

    Gazing into the recession crystal ball

    The protracted trade war between China and the United States and a deteriorating global growth outlook have left investors nervous that the longest expansion in American history is at risk of ending. Recession fears were sparked earlier this year when the yield curve inverted - a key indicator of a pending downturn. An inverted yield curve occurs when yields on short-term bonds are higher than those on long-term bonds, a sign investors are so worried about the future that they are willing to hold long-term bonds, which are usually viewed as a safer alternative to stocks and other investments, even when the payouts are low.

  • MarketWatch

    Treasury yields end higher as trade worries ease

    Yields rise on U.S. government debt on Wednesday, recovering half of the previous session’s large falls, on news that the U.S. and China were on track to complete a phase-one trade deal before a Dec. 15 deadline.

  • Benzinga

    USD/JPY Forecast: Advance Seen As Corrective

    USD/JPY Current Price: 108.94 Risk sentiment improved modestly, safe-havens corrected overbought conditions. The Japanese services PMI returned to expansion territory in November with 50.3. USD/JPY advance ...

  • Soft ADP Report Just Enough to Muck Up Non-Farm Payrolls Data
    FX Empire

    Soft ADP Report Just Enough to Muck Up Non-Farm Payrolls Data

    Be prepared for a two-sided trade shortly after the release of the headline payrolls number because some traders will play the hard number and others will try to factor in the “real” number with the GM workers taken out of the equation.

  • U.S. economy’s huge service sector slows again in November, ISM finds
    MarketWatch

    U.S. economy’s huge service sector slows again in November, ISM finds

    The huge service side of the U.S. economy expanded in November at the slowest pace in four months, adding to a slew of evidence pointing to weaker growth toward year end.

  • What a ‘no-deal’ U.S.-China trade scenario would mean for stocks and bonds
    MarketWatch

    What a ‘no-deal’ U.S.-China trade scenario would mean for stocks and bonds

    After President Donald Trump signals he’s in no rush to complete a trade pact with China, investors weigh what a “no-deal” scenario would mean for financial markets.

  • MarketWatch

    Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields skid most since August after Trump casts doubt on quick China trade deal

    Yields on 30-year U.S. Treasury bonds plunge to biggest one-day drop in over three years, as investors steer away from stocks and other risky assets after President Donald Trump says a U.S.-China trade deal could benefit from waiting until after the 2020 presidential election.

  • Stock Market Live Updates: Dow falls for third day after Trump suggests trade delays
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock Market Live Updates: Dow falls for third day after Trump suggests trade delays

    Headlines moving the stock market in real time.

  • Stock market news: December 3, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: December 3, 2019

    U.S. stocks sold off sharply Tuesday after President Donald Trump suggested he was in no hurry to clinch a trade deal with China.

  • Will no China trade deal bring more Fed rate cuts? It’s not that simple, analysts say
    MarketWatch

    Will no China trade deal bring more Fed rate cuts? It’s not that simple, analysts say

    If China and the U.S. don’t reach a trade deal, its not certain there will be more rate cuts. And the Fed will not move quickly, analysts said Tuesday.

  • Charting a bearish December start, S&P 500 ventures under major support
    MarketWatch

    Charting a bearish December start, S&P 500 ventures under major support

    Technically speaking, each big three U.S. benchmark has ventured under major support amid an early-December market downdraft, writes Michael Ashbaugh.