ANF - Abercrombie & Fitch Co.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
9.42
-0.21 (-2.18%)
At close: 4:06PM EDT

9.42 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:21PM EDT

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Bearishpattern detected
Price Crosses Moving Average

Price Crosses Moving Average

Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close9.63
Open9.63
Bid9.42 x 1100
Ask9.55 x 3000
Day's Range9.35 - 9.77
52 Week Range7.42 - 18.83
Volume3,008,677
Avg. Volume2,662,255
Market Cap587.581M
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.38
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-2.93
Earnings DateAug 27, 2020 - Aug 31, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateMar 05, 2020
1y Target Est12.80
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
Fair Value
XX.XX
Undervalued
37% Est. Return
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  • GlobeNewswire

    Abercrombie & Fitch Co. to Report Second Quarter 2020 Results on August 27, 2020

    NEW ALBANY, Ohio, July 31, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (NYSE: ANF) will host its quarterly earnings conference call for all interested parties on Thursday, August 27, 2020, at 8:30 a.m. ET.  A press release detailing the company’s second quarter results is expected to be issued shortly after 7:30 a.m. ET.  In addition, a presentation of the second quarter results will be available on the company’s website at approximately 7:30 a.m. ET. What:Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call    When:8:30 a.m. ET, Thursday, August 27, 2020    Where:http://corporate.abercrombie.com/investors    How:Log on to the above website, or call:     Domestic Dial-In Number: 1-800-458-4121  Domestic Replay Number: 1-888-203-1112, conference ID number 9820490     International Dial-In Number: 1-323-794-2093  International Replay Number: 1-719-457-0820, conference ID number 9820490 The call will be archived and can be accessed by visiting the company’s website at corporate.abercrombie.com. Safe Harbor Statement Under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 A&F cautions that any forward-looking statements (as such term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995) contained in this press release or made by management or spokespeople of A&F involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various important factors, many of which may be beyond A&F’s control. Words such as “estimate,” “project,” “plan,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” and similar expressions may identify forward-looking statements. Except as may be required by applicable law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. The following factors, in addition to those disclosed in “ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS” of A&F’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended February 1, 2020 and Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 17, 2020, in some cases have affected, and in the future could affect, A&F’s financial performance and could cause actual results for fiscal 2020 and beyond to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any of the forward-looking statements included in this press release or otherwise made by management: the current outbreak of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, has materially adversely impacted and disrupted, and may continue to materially adversely impact and cause disruption to, our business, financial performance and condition, operating results, liquidity and cash flows; the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak has caused significant disruptions in the United States and global economy, the extent of the impact and duration of which is not yet known and any future outbreak of any other highly infectious or contagious disease could have a similar impact; changes in global economic and financial conditions, and the resulting impact on consumer confidence and consumer spending, as well as other changes in consumer discretionary spending habits could have a material adverse impact on our business; failure to engage our customers, anticipate customer demand and changing fashion trends, and manage our inventory commensurately could have a material adverse impact on our business; our failure to operate in a highly competitive and constantly evolving industry could have a material adverse impact on our business; fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could have a material adverse impact on our business; our ability to attract customers to our stores depends, in part, on the success of the shopping malls or area attractions that our stores are located in or around; the impact of war, acts of terrorism, mass casualty events or civil unrest could have a material adverse impact on our business; the impact of extreme weather, infectious disease outbreaks, including COVID-19, and other unexpected events could result in an interruption to our business, as well as to the operations of our third-party partners, and have a material adverse impact on our business; failure to successfully develop an omnichannel shopping experience, a significant component of our growth strategy, or failure to successfully invest in customer, digital and omnichannel initiatives could have a material adverse impact on our business; our failure to optimize our global store network could have a material adverse impact on our business; our failure to execute our international growth strategy successfully and inability to conduct business in international markets as a result of legal, tax, regulatory, political and economic risks could have a material adverse impact on our business; failure to protect our reputation could have a material adverse impact on our business; if our information technology systems are disrupted or cease to operate effectively it could have a material adverse impact on our business; we may be exposed to risks and costs associated with cyber-attacks, data protection, credit card fraud and identity theft that could have a material adverse impact on our business; our reliance on our distribution centers makes us susceptible to disruptions or adverse conditions affecting our supply chain; changes in the cost, availability and quality of raw materials, labor, transportation, and trade relations could have a material adverse impact on our business; we depend upon independent third parties for the manufacture and delivery of all our merchandise, and a disruption of the manufacture or delivery of our merchandise could have a material adverse impact on our business; we rely on the experience and skills of our executive officers and associates, and the failure to attract or retain this talent, or effectively manage succession could have a material adverse impact on our business; fluctuations in our tax obligations and effective tax rate may result in volatility in our results of operations and could have a material adverse impact on our business; our litigation exposure, or any securities litigation and shareholder activism, could have a material adverse impact on our business; failure to adequately protect our trademarks could have a negative impact on our brand image and limit our ability to penetrate new markets which could have a material adverse impact on our business; changes in the regulatory or compliance landscape could have a material adverse impact on our business; and our credit facilities include restrictive covenants that limit our flexibility in operating our business and our inability to obtain credit on reasonable terms in the future could have an adverse impact on our business.About Abercrombie & Fitch Co.Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (NYSE: ANF) is a leading, global specialty retailer of apparel and accessories for Men, Women and Kids through three renowned brands. For more than 125 years, the iconic Abercrombie & Fitch brand has outfitted innovators, explorers and entrepreneurs. Today, the brand reflects the updated attitude of modern consumer, while remaining true to its heritage of creating expertly crafted products with an effortless, American style. The Hollister brand epitomizes the liberating and carefree spirit of the endless California summer for the teen market. abercrombie kids creates smart, playful apparel for children ages 5-14, celebrating the wide-eyed wonder of childhood.The brands share a commitment to offering products of enduring quality and exceptional comfort that allow consumers around the world to express their own individuality and style. The Company operates more than 850 stores under these brands across North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, as well as the e-commerce sites www.abercrombie.com and www.hollisterco.com.Investor Contact: Media Contact:    Pamela Quintiliano Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (614) 283-6751 Investor_Relations@anfcorp.comMackenzie Gusweiler Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (614) 283-6192 Public_Relations@anfcorp.com

  • Reuters

    U.S. CEO-workers pay gap narrowed, then COVID-19 hit - union report

    Top American chief executives on average made 264 times as much as their typical employee in 2019, narrower than the year before, a union report found, but the ratio is expected to rise "dramatically" due to COVID-19. The annual report by the AFL-CIO, the largest U.S. labor federation, is frequently cited as a measure of workforce inequality. The latest ratio was based on the $14.8 million in total compensation the average S&P 500 chief executive received in 2019, and was less than ratio of 287 to 1 that the labor group found based on corporate proxy filings made for 2018.

  • Stores Take Cautious Course in Perplexing B-t-s Season
    WWD

    Stores Take Cautious Course in Perplexing B-t-s Season

    Computers and other at-home learning tools will outpace apparel sales.

  • Did Hedge Funds Make The Right Call On Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (ANF) ?
    Insider Monkey

    Did Hedge Funds Make The Right Call On Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (ANF) ?

    The latest 13F reporting period has come and gone, and Insider Monkey have plowed through 821 13F filings that hedge funds and well-known value investors are required to file by the SEC. The 13F filings show the funds' and investors' portfolio positions as of March 31st, a week after the market trough. Now, we are […]

  • GlobeNewswire

    Hollister Partners with TikTok Stars Charli and Dixie D’Amelio, along with Brand Ambassador Noah Pugliano, for Back-to-School Campaign

    NEW ALBANY, Ohio, July 16, 2020 -- Hollister Co., a division of Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (NYSE: ANF), and the global teen brand celebrating the spirit of an endless summer,.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Raytheon and CVS Look Cheap on Price-Sales Ratio

    The stocks I’m recommending today all sell for less than 1 times sales Continue reading...

  • Is Abercrombie & Fitch Stock a Buy?
    Motley Fool

    Is Abercrombie & Fitch Stock a Buy?

    Abercrombie & Fitch (NYSE: ANF), like many other apparel retail stocks, has plunged this year as the COVID-19 crisis has forced its stores to close. A&F's growth had gradually stabilized after CEO Fran Horowitz took the helm in 2017, but its growth decelerated significantly in 2019 before the pandemic derailed its fragile recovery. What happened to Abercrombie & Fitch?

  • GlobeNewswire

    Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Announces Closing of Offering of $350 Million of Senior Secured Notes due 2025 and Repayment of All Outstanding Borrowings under Term Loan Facility and Amended ABL Facility

    The Senior Secured Notes were offered and sold only to persons reasonably believed to be qualified institutional buyers in reliance on Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and outside the United States to non-U.S. persons in reliance on Regulation S under the Securities Act. The Senior Secured Notes have not been registered under the Securities Act or any state securities laws and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act and applicable state securities laws. A&F cautions that any forward-looking statements (as such term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995) contained in this press release or made by management or spokespeople of A&F involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various important factors, many of which may be beyond A&F’s control.

  • Why Is Abercrombie (ANF) Down 15.4% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Abercrombie (ANF) Down 15.4% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Abercrombie (ANF) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Used Clothing is the New Fad on Changing Customer Preference
    Zacks

    Used Clothing is the New Fad on Changing Customer Preference

    As consumers' changing tastes have altered the retail industry, major U.S. retailers are now looking to tap the boom in the resale market.

  • Nordstrom Switches Gears to Focus on Omnichannel Capabilities
    Zacks

    Nordstrom Switches Gears to Focus on Omnichannel Capabilities

    Nordstrom's (JWN) online sales are gaining traction with consumers staying indoors amid the current COVID-19 scenario. Also, store reopening efforts bode well.

  • Barrons.com

    Why Lululemon’s Stores Can Help Lift the Stock

    Raymond James analyst Matthew McClintock reiterated a Strong Buy rating and $335 price target on the athletic-wear retailer.

  • Hedge Funds Are Selling Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (ANF)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Are Selling Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (ANF)

    In this article you are going to find out whether hedge funds think Abercrombie & Fitch Co. (NYSE:ANF) is a good investment right now. We like to check what the smart money thinks first before doing extensive research on a given stock. Although there have been several high profile failed hedge fund picks, the consensus […]

  • GlobeNewswire

    Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Announces Pricing of $350 Million of Senior Secured Notes due 2025

    This represents a $50 million increase in the original offering amount of the Senior Secured Notes. The Senior Secured Notes will mature on July 15, 2025. The Senior Secured Notes were priced at 100% of face amount for a yield to maturity of 8.75%.

  • Coronavirus update: U.S. death toll edges above 117,000; Oklahoma is one of 9 states that are still setting case records
    MarketWatch

    Coronavirus update: U.S. death toll edges above 117,000; Oklahoma is one of 9 states that are still setting case records

    The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus illness COVID-19 climbed above 117,000 on Wednesday, amid reports that nine states are recording either single day record numbers of cases or their highest seven-day new case averages, indicating they are not managing to contain the spread.

  • Moody's

    Abercrombie & Fitch Management Co. -- Moody's assigns Ba2 to Abercrombie's new notes; affirms Ba3 CFR with negative outlook

    Moody's Investors Service (Moody's) assigned a Ba2 rating to Abercrombie & Fitch Management Co.'s (Abercrombie) proposed senior secured notes. Concurrently, Moody's affirmed the company's Ba3 corporate family rating (CFR) and Ba3-PD probability of default rating (PDR).

  • MarketWatch

    Abercrombie & Fitch to issue $300 million of bonds to raise the funds to repay existing debt

    Teen apparel retailer Abercrombie & Fitch Co. said Wednesday it is planning to offer up to $300 million of senior secured notes that mature in 2025. Proceeds will be used to repay an existing senior secured term loan facility, to repay part of the outstanding borrowings under its Amended ABL Facility to to pay fees. Shares were not yet active premarket, but have fallen 29% in the year to date, while the S&P 500 has fallen 3%.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Announces Proposed Offering of Senior Secured Notes

    The Senior Secured Notes will be guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by A&F and each of the existing and future wholly-owned domestic restricted subsidiaries of A&F that guarantee or will guarantee A&F Management’s existing senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility (the “Amended ABL Facility”) or certain future capital markets indebtedness. The Senior Secured Notes and the related guarantees will be secured by a first priority lien on certain of A&F Management’s, A&F’s and the other guarantors' real property, intellectual property, equipment, equity interests in A&F Management and the guarantors other than A&F, and general intangibles, subject to certain exceptions and permitted liens, and by a second priority lien on security interests in accounts and credit card receivables, inventory, deposit accounts, securities accounts, intercompany loans and related assets, which security interests will be junior to the security interests in such assets that secure the Amended ABL Facility.

  • Macy's may not exist in the future: former Sears exec
    Yahoo Finance

    Macy's may not exist in the future: former Sears exec

    One former retail CEO weighs in on the future of Macy's.

  • Clothing Stores’ Devastation Has Only Just Begun
    Bloomberg

    Clothing Stores’ Devastation Has Only Just Begun

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Investors appear to be getting more upbeat about the post-pandemic fates of major clothing retailers. Shares of companies from Gap Inc. to Urban Outfitters Inc. and Kohl’s Corp. have shot up from April lows as shopping centers start to reopen after Covid-19-related closures. Some chains have trumpeted eye-popping numbers about their re-openings, including T.J. Maxx’s parent, which said sales at reopened stores were higher than they were last year. Abercrombie & Fitch Co. has said sales productivity at reopened U.S. locations was at 80% of 2019 levels, while Guess Inc. said on Wednesday that reopened U.S. locations were at 75% productivity compared to last year. Those kinds of tidbits, along with a better-than-expected May jobs report and consumer surveys showing a willingness to spend, offer fresh hope that something close to normal shopping patterns might return sooner than anticipated. Not so fast. Optimism about the clothing business seems misplaced, at least for now. This retailing category will likely end up more scarred by the pandemic and recession than any other, and the bankruptcies and store closures announced so far are just the beginning of the devastation.In part, this is because many players in the segment didn’t enter this tumult in a position of strength. A long list of clothiers, including Victoria’s Secret, Banana Republic, Chico’s and Express have endured years of lackluster sales as they failed to deliver enticing fashions. And the likes of Macy’s Inc. and Nordstrom Inc. have been trying to reimagine the tired department store format with only limited success. If they were already straining to attract shoppers before the Covid-19 crisis, good luck doing so when many are approaching store visits with caution. It also could prove tough for clothing stores to renegotiate with landlords for more favorable lease terms right now if they weren’t a powerful driver of traffic to shopping centers in the first place.Apparel chains have other unique vulnerabilities in the current moment. Social distancing, of course, has turbocharged the shift toward online shopping. Plenty of clothing retailers have invested heavily in their digital experience and infrastructure in recent years and thus are decently positioned to handle the surge in orders. But return rates for online purchases of clothing are estimated to be far higher than for other types of items, and all that return shipping and restocking could crimp profits. Meanwhile, stores are revamping their procedures around trying on clothes. Nordstrom is opening only a small number of fitting rooms and cleaning them between customers. Kohl’s is keeping them closed altogether. They are right to make adaptations in the interest of public health. But “try before you buy” is crucial to the brick-and-mortar clothing model, and these set-ups just make it that much harder to score a sale.    Plus, as Moody’s analyst Raya Sokolyanska pointed out to me, even if shoppers generally get more comfortable going to stores in a post-lockdown world, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll have the patience for crowd-control measures. Just because someone is willing to wait in line to buy groceries doesn’t mean they’ll do so for swimsuits or sneakers.  Then there’s the merchandise itself. Instead of dressing up for vacations, weddings, church services and board meetings, many shoppers are going to spend the rest of 2020 in sweatpants or their comfy, sartorial cousins. Yes, retailers have spent years making their supply chains speedier and more flexible to react more nimbly to trends. But this situation requires a change in assortment far more profound than adding more off-the-shoulder tops or animal prints, and I fear many of them will end up with piles of blazers, dresses and glittery high heels that they can’t sell.   That’s all before you consider another particularly cruel reality that the entire retail industry is facing. For about a decade, stores have been obsessively focused on adapting themselves for the so-called “experience economy,” adding nail salons, personal styling services, coding classes, wine bars, Instagram-worthy photo-ops, or anything else that will convince people to linger and socialize. Those investments feel painfully useless at a moment when shopping safely means doing it in a solo, task-oriented way. So forgive me for not feeling much assurance from the lines seen at T.J. Maxx re-openings or from comments from Macy’s that demand its reopened stores was “moderately” better than their expectations. Those store visits came when shoppers might have had stimulus checks in hand and were itching to get out of the house as states had just begun lifting lockdowns. But after that burst of activity, the unemployment rate will remain high and Covid-19 fears and precautions will remain in place; that will make for extremely tough circumstances for selling clothes. Moody’s estimates that Ebitda will decline by at least 50% for most apparel retailers this year, and that even by 2021, earnings will be 15% to 35% below what they were in 2019. It seems inevitable that some chains won’t survive those conditions. Last month, J. Crew Group Inc. filed for bankruptcy protection, becoming the first major coronavirus casualty, and was followed soon after by Neiman Marcus Group Inc. and J.C. Penney Co. In the past week, Bloomberg News has reported that both Ascena Retail Group Inc., the corporate parent of Ann Taylor and other stores, and Tailored Brands Inc., parent of Men’s Wearhouse, are also considering bankruptcy. The clothing business is just beginning to unravel. It may be nearly unrecognizable by the time this crisis fully takes its toll. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 big reasons retail brands die in America
    Yahoo Finance

    3 big reasons retail brands die in America

    Yahoo Finance looks at why once proud retail chains such as J.C. Penney have gone bankrupt.

  • Barrons.com

    American Eagle Has Seen Strong Digital Sales and Its Stores Are Reopening. What It Means for the Stock.

    The stock should benefit from sales at newly reopened stores and better inventory and cost controls, according to Morgan Stanley.

  • Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Lack Shine
    Zacks

    Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Lack Shine

    Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Lack Shine

  • Benzinga

    A Look Into Abercrombie & Fitch's Price Over Earnings

    Looking into the current session, Abercrombie & Fitch Inc. (NYSE: ANF) shares are trading at $11.91, after a 2.76% gain. Moreover, over the past month, the stock went up by 18.12%, but in the past year, decreased by 29.86%. Shareholders might be interested in knowing whether the stock is undervalued, even if the company is performing up to par in the current session.The stock is currently above from its 52 week low by 60.62%. Assuming that all other factors are held constant, this could present itself as an opportunity for investors trying to diversify their portfolio with apparel retail stocks, and capitalize on the lower share price observed over the year.The P/E ratio is used by long-term shareholders to assess the company's market performance against aggregate market data, historical earnings, and the industry at large. A lower P/E indicates that shareholders do not expect the stock to perform better in the future, and that the company is probably undervalued. It shows that shareholders are less than willing to pay a high share price, because they do not expect the company to exhibit growth, in terms of future earnings.Most often, an industry will prevail in a particular phase of a business cycle, than other industries.Abercrombie & Fitch Inc. has a better P/E ratio of 19.33 than the aggregate P/E ratio of 13.46 of the apparel retail industry. Ideally, one might believe that Abercrombie & Fitch might perform better in the future than its industry group, but it's probable that the stock is overvalued.P/E ratio is not always a great indicator of the company's performance. Depending on the earnings makeup of a company, investors may not be able to attain key insights from trailing earnings.See more from Benzinga * Abercrombie & Fitch: Q1 Earnings Insights(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.