RL - Ralph Lauren Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
72.84
-1.73 (-2.32%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close74.57
Open75.21
Bid72.66 x 1000
Ask75.34 x 1000
Day's Range72.24 - 76.21
52 Week Range59.82 - 128.29
Volume1,180,632
Avg. Volume1,539,431
Market Cap5.371B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.29
PE Ratio (TTM)8.59
EPS (TTM)8.48
Earnings DateMay 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.75 (3.69%)
Ex-Dividend DateMar 26, 2020
1y Target Est88.81
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
Fair Value
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-8% Est. Return
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  • Luxury Trendspotting Isn't Easy in the Covid-19 Age
    Bloomberg

    Luxury Trendspotting Isn't Easy in the Covid-19 Age

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Almost three weeks ago, the American retailer J.Crew Group Inc. filed for bankruptcy after it fell out of fashion. But there’s one item from the once feted store that shoppers just can’t get enough of: masks. The most recent batch of non-medical face coverings in its signature fabrics — plain blue shirting and blue-and-white stripes — has sold out on its British website.Upmarket, stylish face coverings could provide a bit of a boost in a coronavirus-strewn landscape, where luxury goods sales are expected to drop as much as 35% this year, according to Bain & Co. estimates. To give some idea of the pent-up demand, fashion search platform Lyst said searches for masks are up 1,600% over the past month, compared with the year earlier.   That’s sparked a huge debate in the luxury industry as to whether to cash in. After all, if we’re going to have to wear masks anyway, why not make them chic?It may be tempting. At the height of the crisis, many fashion houses, including LVMH’s Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior, Kering SA’s Gucci, Prada SpA, Burberry Group Plc and Ralph Lauren Inc., repurposed some production facilities to make personal protective equipment for donation to medical workers on the front lines. Burberry is poised to take delivery of a special mask-making machine at its mill in Keighley, Yorkshire. But the items will be for donation, not for sale in its shops. And they certainly won’t be made out of its iconic red, white, black and tan check.While the brands have gained the requisite skills, there are considerable risks associated with turning masks into fashion statements. So far, the bling behemoths are wisely keeping a respectable social distance.If luxury goods companies were to make masks for profit, not only would they need to look stylish, they would probably have to boast some health effectiveness too. And they’d have to be expensive to fit with any luxury brand’s high-end prices. For example, a Louis Vuitton monogrammed mink-fur sleep mask — perfect for catching some shuteye on that first class flight — costs 700 pounds ($859).The danger is that luxury groups would be seen as profiteering from a health-care emergency. What’s more, according to consultants at McKinsey & Co., consumers shift to more subtle “silent luxury,” rather than in-your-face bling, after a large-scale crisis with a heavy emotional toll. What is perceived as unethical behavior — or simply ugly consumerism — could turn off customers, especially younger shoppers who are particularly conscious of brands’ social values.One way to get around this would be to give a percentage of the profits to good causes, or to donate one mask for every one sold. J.Crew has donated 75,000 single-use masks to Montefiore Health System hospitals in New York.Even if the pitfalls around profiteering are surmounted, there are other perils. Luxury is about feeling good. Brands must weigh whether they want to be associated with a pandemic and its huge human and economic toll. And although masks can have replaceable filters that extend their use, it’s unlikely people will hold onto them for long. Being disposable is anathema to luxury goods, from Hermes handbags to Cartier watches, for which heritage is crucial.That doesn’t mean face coverings won’t work for some brands. For example, Off-White, the streetwear label from DJ and designer Virgil Abloh, who is also the artistic director for Louis Vuitton’s menswear, has been producing masks for some time. Off-White’s $95 arrow-logo face mask was the most in-demand men’s fashion item in the first quarter, according to the Lyst index, which measures clothing and accessories searches on its own site, Google and other social media.Streetwear masks, along with heavy boots and multi-pocket coats, are part of an apocalyptic look that began to emerge before Covid-19. Serving to partly conceal one’s identity and repel other urban hazards like pollution, masks are a good fit with younger, edgier brands, such as the aptly named Anti Social Social Club. That’s not the case for traditional luxury.Consequently, the big fashion houses would be better off focusing their attention on items that can be accessorized with masks, or adapting products to changing needs. Luxury resale site Vestiaire Collective saw a 45% increase in orders for scarves, including Hermes’s classic silks, in the last week of March, compared with the previous seven days, and demand has remained elevated. Brands could experiment with supersized sun visors to ensure social distancing or extended collars that could double as face coverings.As the world emerges from the pandemic, and things become less emotionally charged, consumers may give luxury brands more permission to sell them protective clothing. For now, any move to do so will likely be a one-off to grab attention on the catwalk or Instagram. The pop star Billie Eilish, for one, donned a Gucci custom double-G-emblazoned mask for the Grammy awards in January. While Gucci’s decision not to commercialize the product means passing up millions of euros of sales, it’s the right call.  This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here's How Ralph Lauren (RL) Looks Just Ahead of Q4 Earnings
    Zacks

    Here's How Ralph Lauren (RL) Looks Just Ahead of Q4 Earnings

    Ralph Lauren's (RL) fourth-quarter fiscal 2020 results are likely to reflect significant impacts of temporary store closures in North America, China and Europe, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-Canada Goose lays off 125 workers - WSJ

    Canada Goose Holdings Inc has laid off about 125 workers, as the COVID-19 pandemic saps demand for the company's luxury parkas, the Wall Street Journal reported https://on.wsj.com/3bQJZp9 on Wednesday. Luxury retailers, including Ralph Lauren and Capri Holdings, are among the worst-hit companies as the novel coronavirus pushes consumers to snub discretionary products for essentials such as packaged foods, forcing companies to furlough employees and cut down on investments. On Wednesday, Canada Goose said employees who were laid off will receive compensation packages and extended benefits.

  • Analysts Estimate Ralph Lauren (RL) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for
    Zacks

    Analysts Estimate Ralph Lauren (RL) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for

    Ralph Lauren (RL) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Why Ralph Lauren and Other Upscale Stocks Were Rising on Monday
    Motley Fool

    Why Ralph Lauren and Other Upscale Stocks Were Rising on Monday

    Shares of several upscale apparel and home-goods companies were rising on Monday afternoon amid a broad-based market rally driven by a promising report from early trials of a COVID-19 vaccine. Capri Holdings (NYSE: CPRI) was up 12.2%. Ralph Lauren (NYSE: RL) was up 7.7%.

  • CEO of North Face and Vans owner says he is hunting for deals
    Yahoo Finance

    CEO of North Face and Vans owner says he is hunting for deals

    Yahoo Finance catches up with V.F. Corp CEO Steve Rendle to discuss how the owner of Timberland and Vans is navigating the chopping retail environment.

  • Face Mask Production Saving Retailers Amid Coronavirus
    Zacks

    Face Mask Production Saving Retailers Amid Coronavirus

    A number of apparel brands are not only supplementing for the shortage of protective gear but also looking for a survival strategy by selling facial masks and other protective gear.

  • Moody's

    Ralph Lauren Corporation -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Ralph Lauren Corporation

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Ralph Lauren Corporation and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • Yacktman Asset Management's Top 1st-Quarter Buys
    GuruFocus.com

    Yacktman Asset Management's Top 1st-Quarter Buys

    Firm invests in value opportunities from out-of-favor industries Continue reading...

  • Wealthy shoppers are set to shrug off coronavirus at Harrods with pandemic-proof personal shopping
    MarketWatch

    Wealthy shoppers are set to shrug off coronavirus at Harrods with pandemic-proof personal shopping

    A shopping mecca for the rich and famous will open up with the help of personal shoppers after weeks closed by coronavirus pandemic.

  • J. Crew Is the First of Many Retail Casualties
    Bloomberg

    J. Crew Is the First of Many Retail Casualties

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Even as some retailers begin to open stores again, the pain across malls and main streets continues to take its toll.J. Crew Group Inc. on Monday said it would begin pre-arranged Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings and enter into a $1.65 billion debt-for-equity swap with its lenders, becoming the first major U.S. retailer to succumb to the economic convulsions caused by the coronavirus pandemic. It won’t be the only casualty. Other chains are grappling with the same issues: heavy debt loads, compounded by the damage done from locations closed for weeks. Neiman Marcus Group Inc. is closing in on a bankruptcy deal with a group of lenders, Bloomberg News reported on Monday, citing people with knowledge of the matter, and J.C. Penney Co. is reportedly in talks on a loan that would fund it through a restructuring. Meanwhile, Victoria’s Secret-owner L Brands Inc. said late Monday that it agreed to terminate plans to sell a majority stake in the lingerie chain to private equity firm Sycamore Partners. Jefferies analyst Randal Konik had warned last month of potential medium-term solvency issues at L Brands after Sycamore sued to get out of the transaction, citing a collapse in sales and looming debt maturities.Every brand has its own story. In the case of J. Crew, it was one of the first mainstream U.S. retailers to gain real traction with the fashion crowd, and in its heyday was also ahead of its time in areas such as store design. The leadership of former chief executive Mickey Drexler and creative director Jenna Lyons took its preppy styles from classic to cutting edge, all helped by the brand being a favorite of Michelle Obama. But its trendy designs eventually alienated some customers, and when the power partnership came to an end in 2017, it never regained its stride. With cheaper competitors such as Inditex’s Zara and a resurgent Ralph Lauren Corp at the top end, J. Crew had to rely on incessant discounting.J. Crew had hoped in recent months to spin off its faster-growing, denim-focused  Madewell arm as it sought to cut borrowings of almost $1.7 billion as of February. But plans for the initial public offering were scuppered by the pandemic, and it was left struggling to deal with its debt, a legacy from its 2011 leveraged buyout by TPG Capital LP and Leonard Green & Partners LP.Neiman Marcus, meanwhile, was acquired in a $6 billion leveraged buyout by Ares Management LLC and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board almost six years ago. The chain has been in a race with its luxury rivals, such as Nordstrom Inc. to turn stores into temples of indulgence. That all takes investment, made harder with a debt load of $4.3 billion, according to Bloomberg News. J.C. Penney is at the other extreme. It must deal with shabby stores as it struggles to stay relevant while managing total borrowings of $3.6 billion excluding store leases as of Feb. 1.All three chains are facing pressure from online rivals. For J.C. Penney, that’s Amazon. For J. Crew and Neiman, it’s the likes of Richemont’s Net-a-Porter. The latter two are no laggards to online themselves, so this challenge should be  manageable. Their capital structures, however, are proving more of a hurdle.Some stronger groups, including Gap Inc., have tapped the credit markets. In the U.K., a number of retailers such as Asos Plc, have turned to shareholders. American chains may follow suit. But the steep falls in many retailers’ share prices may make that difficult. A buyer also can’t be ruled out for Neiman or J. Crew, which will continue to trade after also reaching agreement on $400 million of financing. After all, both have recognizable brands. But with valuations uncertain, a rescuer can’t be counted on either.While the lockdown, and likely tepid recovery is most worrying for those companies with fragile finances, stronger chains will also emerge weaker. Gap, for instance, revealed that with physical stores shuttered, it would burn through half of its cash pile in less than two months, eroding its financial position at a time when it was seeking to revive its core Gap brand.Gap had $1.25 billion of long-term debt as of Feb. 1, less than one times its Ebitda of $1.6 billion and seemingly manageable. But with the pandemic, cash reserves —  which stood at $1.7 billion on Feb. 1 — have dwindled to an estimated $750 million to $850 million as of May 2.After the struggle to survive, there will be little left over to invest, a problem when consumers are likely to be even more discerning and addicted to online shopping. So for those retailers that do make it through the crisis, prospering afterwards will be another thing entirely.(Updates third paragraph to show Neiman Marcus is close to a bankruptcy deal, and L Brands terminated a sale of Victoria’s Secret.)This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    A Look Into Ralph Lauren's Price Over Earnings

    Right now, Ralph Lauren Inc. (NYSE: RL) share price is at $71.29, after a 3.5% decrease. Over the past month, the stock went up by 16.87%, but over the past year, it actually decreased by 44.40%. With questionable short-term performance like this, and great long-term performance, long-term shareholders might want to start looking into the company's price-to-earnings ratio.The stock is currently above from its 52 week low by 19.17%. Assuming that all other factors are held constant, this could present itself as an opportunity for investors trying to diversify their portfolio with Apparel Manufacturing stocks, and capitalize on the lower share price observed over the year.The P/E ratio is used by long-term shareholders to assess the company's market performance against aggregate market data, historical earnings, and the industry at large. A lower P/E indicates that shareholders do not expect the stock to perform better in the future, and that the company is probably undervalued. It shows that shareholders are less than willing to pay a high share price, because they do not expect the company to exhibit growth, in terms of future earnings.Depending on the particular phase of a business cycle, some industries will perform better than others.Ralph Lauren has a lower P/E than the aggregate P/E of 13.2 of the apparel manufacturing industry. Ideally, one might believe that they might perform worse than its peers, but it's also probable that the stock is undervalued.P/E ratio is not always a great indicator of the company's performance. Depending on the earnings makeup of a company, investors may be unable to attain key insights from trailing earnings.See more from Benzinga * 1st Constitution: Q1 Earnings Insights * Lindblad Expeditions: Q1 Earnings Insights * Recap: Twin Disc Q3 Earnings(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • Why Nordstrom, Ralph Lauren, and Urban Outfitters Stocks Are Lower Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Nordstrom, Ralph Lauren, and Urban Outfitters Stocks Are Lower Today

    Ralph Lauren (NYSE: RL) was down 8.8%. Urban Outfitters (NASDAQ: URBN) was down 7.5%. Apparel retailers (a category that includes most department-store chains nowadays) have been clobbered since the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus in North America.

  • Why Upscale Retail Stocks Were Rising Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Upscale Retail Stocks Were Rising Today

    Shares of several apparel and home-goods retail companies were rising on Monday amid growing optimism about the post-coronavirus future -- and after some new signs that consumers have continued to spend discretionary income online amid the pandemic. Ralph Lauren (NYSE: RL) was up 9.1%. Tapestry (NYSE: TPR), the parent company of Coach and other brands, was up 11.5%.

  • A tsunami of bankruptcies are about to wash away America's retail sector
    Yahoo Finance

    A tsunami of bankruptcies are about to wash away America's retail sector

    The you know what is about to hit the fan in America's retail sector because of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • April will be ‘hideous’ for retail as stores remain shuttered and shoppers stay home, analyst says
    MarketWatch

    April will be ‘hideous’ for retail as stores remain shuttered and shoppers stay home, analyst says

    March’s 8.7% retail sales decline was bad, but GlobalData Retail expects April to be “hideous” since the month won’t have the benefit of even a couple of weeks of store purchase activity. “The whole month looks like it will be a write-off for retail, with stores remaining closed for the duration,” wrote Neil Saunders, managing director at GlobalData Retail. The March retail sales decline was a record, with clothing stores halved and department stores down 20%.

  • J.C. Penney's 'survival is a big question'
    Yahoo Finance

    J.C. Penney's 'survival is a big question'

    The future is looking increasingly bleak for J.C. Penney.

  • MarketWatch

    Skechers will benefit from the continued athleisure trend and global growth, UBS says

    Skechers USA Inc. shows post-coronavirus promise, according to UBS analysts, who think the company will benefit from the continued athleisure trend, which is shifting from "performance" items used for sports and workouts to streetwear. UBS forecasts 6.5% global growth in the athleisure category, with gains in developing markets. "COVID-19 will significantly affect Skechers' FY20 earnings in our view," UBS said. "However, we think the company is an underappreciated global growth stock, even as the world's third largest footwear brand. Thus, we expect for earnings to gradually rebound and exceed FY19 levels." Analysts expect fiscal 2020 sales to fall 15% to $4.4 billion. Skechers 2019 sales were $5.22 billion. UBS maintained its buy rating on Skechers stock with a $32 price target, down from $50. UBS cut price targets for a number of brands, including Ralph Lauren Corp. (to $75 from $123), Coach parent Tapestry Inc. (to $14 from $28), Under Armour Inc. (to $10 from $21) and children's brand Carter's Inc. (to $69 from $101). UBS rates all of those stocks neutral. Skechers shares are down 7.1% in Wednesday trading and down 28.7% for the past year. The S&P 500 index have fallen 4.7% over the last 12 months.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: HanesBrands, Retail giant Gap, Ralph Lauren and Canada Goose
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: HanesBrands, Retail giant Gap, Ralph Lauren and Canada Goose

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: HanesBrands, Retail giant Gap, Ralph Lauren and Canada Goose

  • How Levi's CEO Chip Bergh is leading the jeans maker through the coronavirus pandemic
    Yahoo Finance

    How Levi's CEO Chip Bergh is leading the jeans maker through the coronavirus pandemic

    Yahoo Finance catches up with Levi's CEO Chip Bergh to discuss how he is leading during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • 4 Apparel Stocks Offering PPE Amid Coronavirus Crisis in Focus
    Zacks

    4 Apparel Stocks Offering PPE Amid Coronavirus Crisis in Focus

    Apparel companies are using their knowhow and supplier base to manufacture new masks and gowns or to transfer their own supply of masks to front-line healthcare workers or both.

  • Levi's reports solid quarterly earnings, CEO says jeans maker will come out of coronavirus stronger
    Yahoo Finance

    Levi's reports solid quarterly earnings, CEO says jeans maker will come out of coronavirus stronger

    Yahoo Finance talks with Levi's CEO Chip Bergh about the company's latest earnings and the future of retail following the coronavirus outbreak.

  • MarketWatch

    Ralph Lauren, Abercrombie & Fitch join retailers furloughing employees

    Abercrombie & Fitch Co. and Ralph Lauren Corp. joined a wave of retailers furloughing their store workers Monday, with both announcing they will cease paying some employees on April 12. Abercrombie & Fitch said it would furlough all of its "North America and EMEA region store associates," and will cut hours and pay for about 15% of corporate associates, while executives at the vice president level and higher will take pay cuts of 10% to 33%. Ralph Lauren said its executive chairman and namesake will forego a salary for the 2021 fiscal year as well as any bonus from the 2020 fiscal year, while Chief Executive Patrice Louvet will take a 50% pay cut and ther top executives will trim pay by 20%. As of April 12, the company plans to furlough "all of our store employees where retail operations are suspended, as well as employees whose jobs are not conducive to continued remote working." Ralph Lauren shares dipped about 0.4% in late trading Monday, while Abercrombie stock was steady.

  • Business Wire

    Ralph Lauren Corporation Provides Business Update on COVID-19

    Ralph Lauren Corporation Provides Business Update on COVID-19

  • TheStreet.com

    Cash Flow Statement: How to Read a Company's Finances

    When you buy a stock, you become part owner of a company. Learn how to read a cash flow statement and understand how your company makes and spends cash.