BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
151.39
+5.54 (+3.80%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

151.35 -0.04 (-0.03%)
After hours: 7:10PM EDT

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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close145.85
Open145.45
Bid151.51 x 800
Ask151.73 x 800
Day's Range144.55 - 153.55
52 Week Range89.00 - 391.00
Volume27,014,609
Avg. Volume34,520,585
Market Cap85.433B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.45
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-6.03
Earnings DateJul 22, 2020 - Jul 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 13, 2020
1y Target Est156.72
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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  • Dow Jones Rally Led By Boeing Stock; Tesla Breakout Fuels Nasdaq 100
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Rally Led By Boeing Stock; Tesla Breakout Fuels Nasdaq 100

    The Dow Jones was led by Boeing stock Monday, but small caps and the Nasdaq composite delivered another day of outperformance.

  • Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall Street closes higher as recovery signs soothe protest, pandemic worries

    U.S. stocks posted gains on Monday as signs of U.S. economic recovery helped offset jitters over increasingly violent social unrest amid an ongoing pandemic and rising U.S.-China tensions. Market leaders Facebook Inc, Apple Inc and Amazon.com provided the biggest lift to the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq, while Boeing Co gave the Dow its biggest boost. "Certainly the pace of the stock market recovery can't continue at the pace it has been," said Paul Nolte, portfolio manager at Kingsview Asset Management in Chicago.

  • Reuters

    EMERGING MARKETS-Latam stocks track broader rally; Brazil's real dips

    * Real drops as economic outlook deteriorates * Colombian central bank minutes expected * Brazilian, Mexican manufacturing PMI come off record lows in May (Adds details, updates prices) By Susan Mathew and Ambar Warrick June 1 (Reuters) - Latin American stocks rose on Monday, tracking their global peers amid some relief over Sino-U.S. tensions, while Brazil's real fell on further concerns over the country's economic outlook. Surging iron ore prices buoyed Brazilian mining giant Vale , while planemaker Embraer SA rose after it said China and India could be new partners after its deal with Boeing Co fell apart.

  • Why Boeing, Spirit AeroSystems, and Harley-Davidson Stocks All Popped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Boeing, Spirit AeroSystems, and Harley-Davidson Stocks All Popped Today

    It's the first Monday in June, trading is back in full swing after a holiday-shortened week, and stock markets are glowing a modest shade of green, with the S&P 500 up a healthy 0.5% in midday trading. Industrial stocks, in particular, are getting a nice boost, with shares of Boeing (NYSE: BA) up 3.5%, Boeing airplane parts supplier Spirit AeroSystems (NYSE: SPR) doing even better -- up 9.7% -- and Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) riding 7% higher as of 2:15 p.m. EDT.

  • Reuters

    US STOCKS-U.S. stocks gain as signs of recovery offset protests, economic worries

    Wall Street stocks posted modest gains on Monday as signs suggesting the U.S. economy may be on the road to recovery helped soothe jitters over increasingly violent social unrest and rising U.S.-China tensions. Market leaders Apple Inc, Amazon.com and Facebook Inc provided the biggest lift to the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq, while Boeing Co provided the blue-chip Dow with its biggest boost.

  • MarketWatch

    Dow jumps nearly 75 points on gains in shares of Boeing, American Express

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up Monday afternoon with shares of Boeing and American Express leading the way for the index. Shares of Boeing (BA) and American Express (AXP) are contributing to the index's intraday rally, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 70 points, or 0.3%, higher. Boeing's shares have climbed $5.50, or 3.8%, while those of American Express have risen $2.13, or 2.2%, combining for an approximately 52-point bump for the Dow.

  • Barrons.com

    Soybeans, Pork, and China Could Tank Stocks’ Rally

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  • Barrons.com

    Embraer’s Results Highlight Tough Times in Aviation. Talk of a Deal Continues.

    Regional jet maker Embraer reported weak first-quarter 2020 results Monday morning—no surprise, given that the commercial-aviation value chain has been hammered by the Covid-19 pandemic.

  • MarketWatch

    Boeing, American Express share gains lead Dow's 66-point jump

    DOW UPDATE Behind strong returns for shares of Boeing and American Express, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is trading up Monday morning. Shares of Boeing (BA) and American Express (AXP) have contributed about a quarter of the blue-chip gauge's intraday rally, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 66 points higher (0.

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    Low-Price Retailers Post High Growth

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  • Embraer says China, India are potential partners after failed Boeing deal
    Reuters

    Embraer says China, India are potential partners after failed Boeing deal

    Brazil's Embraer SA said on Monday that China and India could be potential new partners, following a Reuters report last week that said those two countries as well as Russia were interested in the planemaker's commercial jets division. Embraer is dealing with the abrupt collapse of a planned deal with Boeing Co in April that left the company scrambling for a plan B. Embraer Chief Executive Francisco Gomes Neto said in an earnings call that it was still early to discuss new opportunities in detail as the company is studying a new five-year plan.

  • We All Might Be Flying in Planes Again Soon
    Bloomberg

    We All Might Be Flying in Planes Again Soon

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Covid-19 became a pandemic because airplane passengers carried the new coronavirus with them around the world. As that became clear, airlines grounded nearly all of their fleets, governments issued travel restrictions and mandatory quarantines, and tourist attractions and conferences closed down. With no reason to fly, a quick recovery for air travel seemed unlikely. Warren Buffett dumped his airline stocks, claiming that the “world has changed.”Passengers also wouldn’t feel safe packed inside a metal tube for hours, would they?Happily for the industry, if not for the climate, the seemingly insurmountable barriers to air travel have begun to look less daunting. “We believe the worst is behind us, and we’re on the uptick,” American Airlines Group Inc.’s boss, Doug Parker, said after a surge in travel over the U.S. Memorial Day holiday weekend.Investors have taken notice. The Bloomberg Americas Airlines stocks index has rebounded by almost one-third from the mid-May low, and European carriers have made similar gains. Shares in German tour operator Tui AG have risen too.Such optimism feels jarring when airlines, American Airlines included, are poised to cut thousands of jobs. Most are still burning huge amounts of cash. Deutsche Lufthansa AG needs a 9 billion-euro ($10 billion) bailout, and Latam Airlines Group SA joined Latin American peer Avianca Holdings SA in filing for bankruptcy last week.But Parker is probably right to expect a continued recovery, at least on domestic and short-haul routes. This won’t be enough to put debt-laden airlines on a secure footing, and a full demand recovery probably won’t happen for a couple more years. But, right now, a desperate industry will take any good news it can get. The rigorous hygiene measures airlines have announced should go a long way toward restoring passenger confidence.  European budget carrier Ryanair Holdings Plc expects to operate at 40% of normal capacity from July, and the way bookings are shaping up suggests those planes will probably be at least half full. EasyJet Plc sees “encouraging” trends and notes that winter bookings are higher than usual for this time of year, although part of that may be because people have refund vouchers to use and are rebooking cancelled trips.  Ryanair’s extensive summer flight schedule had seemed premature a couple of weeks ago, but the travel restrictions that kept Europeans from moving around the continent are being relaxed. Starting in July, Spain is set to drop its requirement for international arrivals to quarantine for 14 days. Britain imposed a similar rule but is under immense pressure to abandon it. Travel between Europe and the U.S. will take longer to open up, but even on this there are encouraging signs of political will to get people flying again.   A month ago, United Airlines Holdings Inc.’s chief executive officer, Scott Kirby, lamented that there wouldn’t be a recovery in flying until attractions like Disney World and the Paris museums were open again.Well, they will be soon. It’s already possible to visit the Acropolis in Athens and St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Paris’s parks and museums are set to reopen from June. The French capital is usually swamped with tourists at this time of year, so there’s an incentive for travelers to get there first. Walt Disney World expects to reopen its Florida park from July, albeit with compulsory face masks and a ban on hugging your favorite Disney character.I’ve written before about how things like wearing masks and having to ask permission to use the toilet will make flying even less enjoyable. But these measures may make passengers feel safer. For example, while the gowns and other personal protective equipment issued to Emirates’ cabin crew are a little intimidating, they’re likely to put some nervous flyers at ease.As with SARS almost two decades ago, there are understandable concerns about catching coronavirus within the aircraft cabin, most likely from someone seated close by. The evidence isn’t comprehensive or conclusive, but so far there are surprisingly few documented cases of this happening with Covid-19. Airline industry body IATA says it knows of only one case where a person transmitted the virus to more than one person on board. Not surprisingly, plane manufacturers Airbus SE and Boeing Co. are studying the subject intensively. There are other plausible reasons why flying might be safer than you’d think: The air is filtered and frequently replenished from outside, seats act as somewhat of a barrier and passengers don’t move around the cabin much. Singing, yelling and talking loudly — contributors to so-called super-spreader infection events — are a big faux pas when you fly. Many passengers would still prefer the middle seat to be empty, but as I’ve written before, unless ticket prices rise, that would severely hamper airlines’ ability to break even.Of course, the longer someone’s on board, the greater the chance they’re exposed to infection. Hence people may feel comfortable flying domestic and short-haul before they’re willing to fly halfway around the globe.Companies will probably take longer to get comfortable with the risk (and potential liability) of their employees flying for business. About half the corporate clients American Airlines surveyed still have a travel ban, although that’s down from two-thirds at the peak of the crisis. Millions of potential passengers have also lost their jobs and won’t feel able to splash out on holidays.And then there are the psychological scars from the prolonged lockdown. Being outside now feels a lot safer than being in any kind of confined space. A staycation in a local Airbnb might feel preferable to getting on a plane.For those willing to take the risk, and who can find adequate travel insurance, a rare opportunity awaits. Want to see Venice without the crowds? Now’s your chance.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • SpaceX Astronauts Reach Space Station After Milestone Voyage
    Bloomberg

    SpaceX Astronauts Reach Space Station After Milestone Voyage

    (Bloomberg) -- Two American astronauts boarded the International Space Station from a SpaceX capsule, marking the first time humans have traveled to orbit on a commercially developed craft, forging a new era for NASA and visionary billionaire Elon Musk.The Dragon craft carrying NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley arrived at the orbiting lab at 10:16 a.m. Eastern time Sunday, about 19 hours after lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. They entered the station at 1:22 p.m. after completing a series of arrival checklists.“We have to congratulate the men and women of SpaceX,” Hurley said after the docking. “Their incredible efforts over the last several years to make this possible cannot go overstated.”The milestone flight is the first time American astronauts have flown from U.S. soil since the space shuttle program ended in 2011. The achievement comes 18 years after Musk founded Space Exploration Technologies Corp. with the ultimate goal of populating other planets. Hurley called it “an incredible time to be at NASA,” with three manned-vehicle programs in the works and progress toward a return to the moon.“Welcome to Bob and Doug,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told the astronauts from Mission Control in Houston shortly after the two men entered the station. “The whole world saw this mission and we are so, so proud of everything you have done for our country and to inspire the world,” he said.QuickTake: Why U.S. Astronauts Hitched Historic Ride With SpaceXThe highest-profile U.S. rocket launch in decades captured interest around the globe, watched live on Saturday by approximately 10 million people. The flight comes at a time when people are clamoring for good news amid the Covid-19 pandemic, surging unemployment and growing U.S. protests against police violence.“This is just one effort that we can show for the ages in this dark time that we’ve had over the past several months to kind of inspire, especially the young people in the United States, to reach for these lofty goals and work hard and look at what you can accomplish,” Hurley said from the space station.‘So Proud’President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were among those who gathered with Musk to watch the spectacle. Trump spoke with the two astronauts prior to the launch and, in a brief exchange with reporters, referred to Musk as one of the “great brains,” according to a pool report.The rooftop shook as the rocket rumbled to orbit, according to the report. Within seconds, Elton John’s “Rocket Man” -- a Trump rally classic -- began to play over speakers, the report said.“They have a long way to go but that’s a very dangerous part of it there,” Trump said. “I’m so proud of the people, of NASA, public and private. When you see a sight like that, it’s incredible. When you hear that sound — the roar — you can imagine how dangerous it is.”The launch and the initial phases of the journey proceeded smoothly. The main rocket booster flew back to Earth and stuck the landing on a drone ship -- a once-remarkable feat that has become routine for SpaceX.The two astronauts joined the Expedition 63 crew members already in residence on the space station. Their voyage, known as Demo-2, is the final major test of SpaceX’s human spaceflight system before the National Aeronautics and Space Administration certifies it to fly working missions to the space station.Boeing Co. is also preparing to carry people to the orbiting lab as part of the same Commercial Crew program at NASA.Weather ClearsThe SpaceX launch was originally slated for May 27, but was scrubbed due to bad weather. While rain showers earlier Saturday briefly raked launch complex 39A, the weather cleared and SpaceX loaded fuel onto the Falcon 9 rocket and moved through a final check of its systems.Gwynne Shotwell, the company’s president and chief operating officer, said she was “super-nervous, stomach-in-throat,” in a television interview from SpaceX headquarters minutes before lift-off. Shotwell and her team monitored the mission from the company’s control center in Hawthorne, California, wearing masks and sitting at carefully spaced terminals.Successfully carrying humans to space would mark the latest breakthrough for a company known for setting audacious goals. In the decade since the first Falcon 9 rocket reached orbit, SpaceX has eclipsed rivals like Europe’s Arianespace and United Launch Alliance, a Boeing-Lockheed Martin Corp. venture, to grab the lead of commercial launches.“Launching satellites is nice and we got to bring in more money than we spend, this is important, but ultimately this is life beyond earth,” Musk said at a briefing after the launch, where he recalled how he developed SpaceX with funds he got from PayPal. “Hopefully this is the first step on that journey” for “life becoming multi-planetary for the first time.”Musk’s space company is valued at about $36 billion, and its bravado and reusable rockets have inspired other entrepreneurs. The competition could get fierce this decade as Blue Origin, founded and funded by billionaire Jeff Bezos, Northrop Grumman Corp., ULA and Sierra Nevada Corp. all bring new spacecraft to market.‘Numerous Providers’At least that’s the dream for Bridenstine, the NASA administrator. The U.S. space agency is seeking to change the notion that government must create both demand and supply for spaceflight. He said at a post-launch briefing that NASA is seeking a business model where it’s not the only customer.“We want to have numerous providers competing on cost, innovation and safety,” he said in an interview on Bloomberg TV on May 27.Commercial spaceflight has taken a long time to evolve since 2001, when engineer and entrepreneur Dennis Tito, founder and CEO of Wilshire Associates, became the first private individual to buy a seat to space aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket.Now, with the financial disruption from Covid-19 injecting fresh uncertainty into the industry’s immediate future, Bridenstine vowed to push ahead. He said he hoped the moment would be a bright spot amid the nation’s many challenges.“I was praying for Bob and Doug, I was praying for their families, I was praying for their safe return,” he said. “If this can inspire a young child to become the next Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos or Sir Richard Branson, then this is what this is all about.”(Updates with entry to space station and comments in first six paragraphs)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • After Historic SpaceX Launch, NASA Touts Business Model For Commercializing Space
    Investor's Business Daily

    After Historic SpaceX Launch, NASA Touts Business Model For Commercializing Space

    SpaceX is the first company to take people to space, and NASA said it helps establish the business model for commercialization.

  • First Manned Flight Is Just One Step for SpaceX
    Bloomberg

    First Manned Flight Is Just One Step for SpaceX

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule that’s orbiting the Earth with two U.S. astronauts is the picture of New Space Age glamour. It’s a sleek, stylish commercially made capsule that’s destined to be featured beside Italian sports cars in future design textbooks. Just don’t tell that to Elon Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive and chief designer. “Is a Ferrari more reliable than a Toyota Corolla or a Honda Civic?” he once asked a space journalist. The answer, of course, is that the simpler sedans are far more reliable than the well-crafted sports car. So SpaceX, Musk made clear, was going to make Corollas.It’s a practically minded outlook for a company founded on the galactically large ambition to transform humanity into a multiplanetary species. But Musk and SpaceX implicitly understand something that national space programs haven’t really accepted: Success in space exploration isn’t, ultimately, about achieving “firsts” like the moon landing. Rather, it’s repeat business that will establish moon colonies and Musk’s Martian city. To get that business, SpaceX has to show that national space programs, with their expensive, Ferrari-like rockets, capsules and contractors, won’t get there. On Saturday, it succeeded.The 20th century space race wasn’t about the money, it was about the record books. The respective financial strengths of the U.S. and Soviet systems certainly played a role, but when national pride is at stake, performance matters more than costs. For decades, NASA, in particular, internalized that priority by adopting cost-plus contracts with its contractors. Under these arrangements, NASA agrees to pay the value of a project’s development costs, plus an associated fee (often about 10%). It’s an excellent system for encouraging contractors to invest in difficult, long-term projects with hazy costs.But if the goal is to create something that works repeatedly, and on-budget, cost-plus is a problem. After all, if a contractor’s fees increase during project delays, then that contractor lacks an incentive to control costs and finish on deadline. Making matters more difficult, expensive government programs must meet political requirements that no profit-seeking business would ever consider. The development of the 1970s-era space shuttle was spread out over states and produced an outrageously expensive “reusable” rocket that took thousands of hours to prepare for reuse. In 2012, Musk correctly called the shuttle “a Ferrari to the nth power.”By that point, Musk, too, was working with the U.S. government. But unlike traditional NASA contractors such as the Boeing Co, he was doing it on a fixed-fee basis. So, rather than get paid along the way, SpaceX accepted a fixed fee to build a technology, and whatever wasn’t used in development could be kept as profit.That doesn’t mean cutting corners. NASA requires that SpaceX’s technology meet its high safety standards (often to Musk’s chagrin). But it does mean that SpaceX has a strong incentive to find ways to control costs while building cutting-edge technology. For example, rather than try to perfect a single rocket for a flawless first launch, SpaceX opted for iterative design, whereby it launched — and failed — early prototypes repeatedly, as a means to learn from its mistakes and speed up rocket design. It’s an approach that differs substantially from traditional aerospace companies, which spend years and money perfecting a design before flying it (the Ferrari approach). Likewise, SpaceX, freed from political constraints, concentrated its design and testing in single locations, rather than spread it out geographically. It’s what any rational for-profit manufacturer would do.This approach has been fruitful. The rocket that carried the Crew Dragon capsule into orbit is a Falcon 9, from a family of rockets developed for $390 million with assistance from NASA under fixed-price contracts. According to a 2011 NASA report, the cost would’ve been $1.7 billion to $4 billion if the same rocket had been developed using traditional means. More dramatically, the development of the Falcon 9 has reduced the cost of a space launch by a factor of 20, at least. A kilogram launched on the space shuttle, which last flew in 2011, cost about $54,500. A kilogram on the Falcon 9 runs about $2,700.Of course, launching humans into space is more difficult and expensive than launching cargo. Even so, SpaceX managed to lap more traditional contractors. In 2011, NASA announced plans to build the Space Launch System, a massive new rocket to send Americans back to the moon. To save on costs and time, the rocket was to be built using engines and other components from the space shuttle program. Ominously, it was also to be built by the Boeing Co under a cost-plus contract. In 2014, NASA committed to a November 2018 launch date at a cost of $9.7 billion. Then the launch dates started slipping, all to the benefit of Boeing. By March, the launch date had moved to the second half of 2021, with costs escalating to $18.3 billion. If and when it flies, each rocket will exceed $1 billion — more than three times what it cost to develop the Falcon 9.For now, SpaceX’s approach is the clear winner, but its challenges are far from over. Above all, the company must demonstrate that its relatively inexpensive human-capable flights have a commercial market — an idea that’s far from certain. Similarly, the company will need to prove the business case for its longer-term, and substantially more expensive, ambitious exploration program. But today, at least, the Musk’s Corolla is beating the Ferrari by millions of miles.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Adam Minter is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is the author of “Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade” and "Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Reuters

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  • SpaceX successfully launches U.S. astronauts into space
    MarketWatch

    SpaceX successfully launches U.S. astronauts into space

    Space Exploration Technologies Corp. on Saturday successfully launches the first astronauts into space from U.S. soil in nine years. The capsule carrying NASA astronauts reached orbit on its way to the International Space Station.

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    Motley Fool

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