AMAT - Applied Materials, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
46.01
-0.27 (-0.58%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

45.55 -0.46 (-1.00%)
After hours: 5:34PM EDT

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Previous Close46.28
Open46.00
Bid45.55 x 1000
Ask45.93 x 1300
Day's Range45.50 - 46.22
52 Week Range28.79 - 50.39
Volume5,904,225
Avg. Volume9,730,717
Market Cap43.07B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.62
PE Ratio (TTM)12.90
EPS (TTM)3.57
Earnings DateAug 14, 2019 - Aug 19, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.84 (1.82%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-21
1y Target Est51.10
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At Applied Materials, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:AMAT)
    Simply Wall St.2 days ago

    Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At Applied Materials, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:AMAT)

    Gary Dickerson has been the CEO of Applied Materials, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMAT) since 2013. This report will, first, examine...

  • Zacks.com featured highlights include: Stryker, T. Rowe, Applied Materials, Fiat and Northrop
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  • Is Applied Materials (AMAT) Outperforming Other Computer and Technology Stocks This Year?
    Zacks5 days ago

    Is Applied Materials (AMAT) Outperforming Other Computer and Technology Stocks This Year?

    Is (AMAT) Outperforming Other Computer and Technology Stocks This Year?

  • Should Value Investors Buy Applied Materials (AMAT) Stock?
    Zacks5 days ago

    Should Value Investors Buy Applied Materials (AMAT) Stock?

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    Market Realist6 days ago

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  • Forget Micron, Buy These 5 Top-Ranked Semi Stocks in 2H19
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  • Benzinga7 days ago

    Applied Materials Launches Next Generation Of Memory Design: 'A New Vector Of Innovation'

    Applied Materials, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMAT ) hosted its AI Design Forum Tuesday in San Francisco, during which the company introduced its Endura platforms for manufacturing the next-gen of memories. Although ...

  • Powell’s Testimony Drives US Stock Market to All-Time High
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Powell’s Testimony Drives US Stock Market to All-Time High

    This morning, US index futures surged after Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell’s testimony raised the possibility of a near-term cut in interest rates.

  • Why Shares of Applied Materials Rose 16.1% in June
    Motley Fool8 days ago

    Why Shares of Applied Materials Rose 16.1% in June

    The semiconductor manufacturer benefited from industrywide trends.

  • Applied Materials Enables Emerging Memories for the Internet of Things and Cloud Computing
    GlobeNewswire8 days ago

    Applied Materials Enables Emerging Memories for the Internet of Things and Cloud Computing

    Applied Materials, Inc. today unveiled innovative, high-volume manufacturing solutions aimed at accelerating industry adoption of new memory technologies targeting the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing. New memories – notably MRAM, ReRAM and PCRAM – promise unique benefits, but they are based on new materials that have been too challenging for high-volume manufacturing. Today, Applied Materials is introducing new manufacturing systems that allow novel materials – the key to these new memories – to be deposited with atomic-level precision.

  • `Quality' Stocks Look Very Different Than They Did a Decade Ago
    Bloomberg8 days ago

    `Quality' Stocks Look Very Different Than They Did a Decade Ago

    (Bloomberg) -- With the U.S. economic expansion getting longer and longer, nervous investors are pouring money into funds tracking the investment factor known as “quality.” It’s a category whose composition has changed.Gone are the days when having a rock-solid balance-sheet meant you made food, sold clothes or built industrial infrastructure. Now, technology firms are king, with chip manufacturers overrunning the list. The rules are the same -- quality denotes a high return on equity, low debt and lots of free cash flow. But the businesses that qualify have evolved.“These tech companies have kind of grown up and they meet the criteria,” said Nick Kalivas, senior equity product strategist for Invesco Ltd.’s ETF business. “They’re still more cyclical than kind of the old-school quality, so that’s a really interesting dynamic that has surfaced.”For bubble-watchers, it’s another example of how much the market has changed since the dot-com days. Agents of volatility back then, computer and software makers now are some of the oldest and most profitable firms around. Their contribution to the S&P 500’s overall earnings has quadrupled in two decades.Smart-beta ETFs that focus on quality stocks have taken in $3 billion in 2019, the best half-year period on record. As investors question the staying power of the bull run and economic cycle, finding companies with sound finances and profitability has become a priority.The $1.5 billion Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF, which trades under the ticker SPHQ, devotes more of its cash to technology stocks than any other sector. A Bloomberg Portfolio analysis shows the fund’s tech allocation has steadily risen over the past decade, and now the ETF holds just about double the amount of tech stocks it did at the end of 2009.While much of that is in software and services, semiconductor stocks also have a bigger role. For years, Linear Technology Corp. was the lone semiconductor company that met the criteria for inclusion in the Invesco quality fund. Now there are seven, with popular names such as Applied Materials Inc., Intel Corp., Qualcomm Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. making the cut. Linear was acquired three years ago and no longer exists.But the inclusion of more cyclical stocks also means the quality factor is experiencing a “step up” in risk, Kalivas said. Tech stocks are by nature higher-beta than their predecessors and that could amplify volatility going up and coming down. At the same time, “it’s hard to get fired for having something that returns a lot on equity, has low debt, and generates a lot of cash,” he said.Volatility has been friendly to quality owners in 2019. The Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF is up 20% year-to-date, outperforming the broader S&P 500 Index, juiced by the 29% gain in technology stocks. Data compiled by Bloomberg shows that among the five stocks with the most influence on SPHQ, three were tech companies.Whether or not the makeover provides support when the stock market is falling is yet to be seen.“If the academic research plays out, that’s exactly what should happen,” Kalivas said. “They should not have that big downside, their ability to generate cash should support them.”To contact the reporter on this story: Sarah Ponczek in New York at sponczek2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Chris NagiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Markit8 days ago

    See what the IHS Markit Score report has to say about Applied Materials Inc.

    Applied Materials Inc NASDAQ/NGS:AMATView full report here! Summary * Perception of the company's creditworthiness is positive * Bearish sentiment is low * Economic output for the sector is expanding but at a slower rate Bearish sentimentShort interest | PositiveShort interest is extremely low for AMAT with fewer than 1% of shares on loan. This could indicate that investors who seek to profit from falling equity prices are not currently targeting AMAT. Money flowETF/Index ownership | NeutralETF activity is neutral. The net inflows of $5.98 billion over the last one-month into ETFs that hold AMAT are not among the highest of the last year and have been slowing. Economic sentimentPMI by IHS Markit | NegativeAccording to the latest IHS Markit Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) data, output in the Technology sector is rising. The rate of growth is very weak relative to the trend shown over the past year, and has continued to ease. However, the rate of expansion may accelerate in the coming months. Credit worthinessCredit default swap | PositiveThe current level displays a positive indicator. AMAT credit default swap spreads are near the lowest level of the last three years and indicate the market's continued positive perception of the company's credit worthiness.Please send all inquiries related to the report to score@ihsmarkit.com.Charts and report PDFs will only be available for 30 days after publishing.This document has been produced for information purposes only and is not to be relied upon or as construed as investment advice. To the fullest extent permitted by law, IHS Markit disclaims any responsibility or liability, whether in contract, tort (including, without limitation, negligence), equity or otherwise, for any loss or damage arising from any reliance on or the use of this material in any way. Please view the full legal disclaimer and methodology information on pages 2-3 of the full report.

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    Investor's Business Daily9 days ago

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  • Tech earnings could be in for ‘startling’ decline next 12 months, analyst warns
    MarketWatch9 days ago

    Tech earnings could be in for ‘startling’ decline next 12 months, analyst warns

    One of tech’s most influential analysts has looked into his crystal ball, and doesn’t like what he sees for tech earnings this quarter and beyond.

  • MarketWatch9 days ago

    Applied Materials, Lam Research stocks fall after D.A. Davidson downgrades

    Shares of Applied Materials Inc. and Lam Research Inc. are falling in premarket trading Monday after D.A. Davidson analyst Thomas Diffely cut his ratings on both stocks to sell as part of a broader downgrade of the chip-equipment industry. " We are moving to a neutral stance on the semiconductor capital equipment group this morning as the stocks have appreciated significantly YTD while the all-important memory recovery continues to lag expectations and the near term data flow will likely remain negative," he wrote. "There is significant uncertainty in the timing and magnitude of the wafer fab equipment (WFE) recovery and we believe the equipment names will remain largely range-bound until some clarity returns." Diffely said that the sharp gains in semiconductor-equipment shares have "clearly" outpaced the fundamentals. Applied Materials shares have climbed 34% so far this year, while Lam Research shares have risen 35% and the S&P 500 has gained 19%.

  • 3 Semiconductor Stocks to Buy in July After Trade War Cease-Fire
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  • If Masayoshi Son Won't Invest in Japan, Why Should You?
    Bloomberg13 days ago

    If Masayoshi Son Won't Invest in Japan, Why Should You?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Softbank Group Corp.’s Vision Fund has invested its $100 billion cash pile in 75 unicorns around the world. Not a single one is from Japan, its own backyard.That may be because the pickings are slim: While the U.S. has 179 unicorns, China 93, and India 18, Japan has just two, according to CB Insights. How can a country that pioneered the Walkman and android robots fail to produce more valuable startups? The explanation may be somewhat arcane, but helps get to the bottom of a damaging cycle that’s left Japan with an uninspiring pool of fledgling innovators.The listing standards for the small-cap Tokyo Stock Exchange Mothers Index are exceedingly low. To join Nasdaq, its New York counterpart, companies need a minimum of 1.25 million traded shares upon listing. That compares with just 2,000 for Mothers. This short hurdle, among others, means young, cash-hungry firms can tap public markets pretty easily, and sidestep the grinding process of courting investors through multiple rounds of funding.The trouble is, size begets size. The bigger a company at listing, the greater the likelihood of attracting large chunks of institutional money and growing still larger. (It pays to be patient.) What’s left is an index stuffed with unreliable runts: 96% of Mothers's 283 components have a valuation of less than $1 billion, compared with roughly one-third for Nasdaq. The Japanese index was notorious for its scandal-studded constituents in the past, and remains volatile.Just two Japanese unicorns have gone public in the last two years, with mixed results: Flea market app Mercari Inc. is down 4% since raising $1.2 billion last June, while business-card scanner and networking firm Sansan Inc. is up 33% after listing last month. The two unicorns left include four-year-old Preferred Networks Inc., whose app uses artificial intelligence to automate the coloring of manga cartoons, and Tokyo-based cryptocurrency trading platform Liquid Group Inc.With few appealing options, the likes of Masayoshi Son take their venture-capital dollars elsewhere. But the bigger the funding vacuum, the greater the incentive startups have to list early and small. And so the cycle continues.There are cultural challenges to Japanese innovation, too. Attracting young graduates to unsteady jobs can be a tough sell: Many would rather join Toyota Motor Corp. or other established firms. Japanese founders also have a reputation for crippling timidity when asking for money, unlike their brazen rivals in Silicon Valley.  That’s not to say that startup activity has plateaued. Venture funding hit a record $3.5 billion last year, though that’s a shadow of levels in the U.S. and China, which both top out at more than $100 billion. This year, the Mothers index is up around 20% in local currency terms, outperforming the 9% gain for the benchmark Topix index, and IPO volumes reached a high last year.Attitudes are also changing. Startups are losing their stigma and luring more graduates, Yoshito Hori, managing partner of domestic venture-capital firm Globis Capital Partners told the AVCJ Japan Forum last week in Tokyo. Funding into early-stage tech firms reached $1.7 billion this year, according to Asia Private Equity Review, compared with more than $1.6 billion in all of 2018. But even Hori, whose firm backed Mercari and Sansan, said that there’s still not enough money around to back mega venture-capital funding rounds. The truth is that the real opportunities in Japan are in private equity, with plenty of mature firms desperate for a turnaround and aging founders looking for buyouts. Last year, a group led by Bain Capital acquired Toshiba Corp.’s memory chip business for $18 billion. This week, KKR & Co. sold the semiconductor part of Japan’s Hitachi Kokusai Electric to U.S.-based Applied Materials Inc. for around $2.2 billion. It paid around the same amount when it bought the entire wireless equipment maker, including the video business it’s retaining, from Hitachi Ltd. just 18 months ago. Even the Japan Post Bank Co., one of the world’s largest lenders, and the country’s Government Pension Investment Fund, the biggest pool of retirement savings in the world, are allocating money toward private equity. Still, a prime minister can dream: Shinzo Abe's government aims to produce 20 unicorns by 2023. The chances of pulling that off are sobering.To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Applied Materials Shares Are Alerting Big Buy Demand
    Investopedia15 days ago

    Applied Materials Shares Are Alerting Big Buy Demand

    Easing trade concerns and strong institutional buy signals suggest additional upside potential for Applied Materials stock.

  • Mettler-Toledo (MTD) Hits 52-Week High, Can the Run Continue?
    Zacks15 days ago

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  • Applied Materials to Acquire Kokusai Electric for $2.2B
    Zacks15 days ago

    Applied Materials to Acquire Kokusai Electric for $2.2B

    Applied Materials (AMAT) agrees to acquire Kokusai Electric from KKR in a bid to boost the memory business.

  • Applied Materials Said to Buy Kokusai Electric
    Bloomberg15 days ago

    Applied Materials Said to Buy Kokusai Electric

    (Bloomberg) -- Applied Materials Inc., the biggest maker of machines used to make semiconductors, is buying Kokusai Electric from KKR in a deal worth about 250 billion yen ($2.3 billion), a person with knowledge of the matter said, asking not to be identified because the details aren’t public.Investment firm KKR bought the Japanese mobile phone and wireless communication equipment manufacturer, a former unit of Hitachi, in a tender offer in 2017.A representative for KKR declined to comment. Representatives for Applied Materials didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.Applied Materials sought to merge with Tokyo Electron in 2015, but the deal was scrapped amid opposition from the U.S. Department of Justice.The proposed deal by Applied Materials to buy Kokusai Electric, first reported by the Nikkei newspaper, is also seen facing scrutiny from regulators.(Corrects Kokusai Electric company name throughout.)To contact the reporter on this story: Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, ;Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Colum Murphy, Reed StevensonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.