MONC.MI - Moncler S.p.A.

Milan - Milan Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
40.07
+1.21 (+3.11%)
At close: 5:35PM CET
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close38.86
Open38.92
Bid39.50 x 0
Ask40.15 x 0
Day's Range38.63 - 40.07
52 Week Range31.09 - 43.61
Volume1,420,601
Avg. Volume1,213,423
Market Cap10.109B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.80
PE Ratio (TTM)29.64
EPS (TTM)1.35
Earnings DateFeb 10, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield0.40 (1.03%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 20, 2019
1y Target Est37.35
  • These Pricey Shares Just Got $46 Billion Cheaper
    Bloomberg

    These Pricey Shares Just Got $46 Billion Cheaper

    (Bloomberg) -- European equities suffered their sharpest sell-off in nearly four months yesterday, sending the Stoxx 600 index to test its 50-day moving average. Looking at the damage, one European sector has been particularly hammered since the coronavirus outbreak started to hit markets last week: luxury goods.About $46 billion: That’s the cumulative market cap wipe-out from the top nine European luxury-goods stocks since a peak earlier this month, half of which is from France’s LVMH, which reports earnings after the market close today. The sector was already under pressure because of the protests in Hong Kong this year, so no wonder fears are mounting about the 2020 prospects for stocks highly exposed to Chinese customers, as the virus puts many cities in lock-down during the of Lunar New Year holiday, a crucial period for shopping and travel.Similarities are being drawn with past crises. While it’s too early to determine the severity of the new coronavirus, travel trends and hotel occupancy in China dropped meaningfully during the SARS outbreak of 2002 and 2003, Morgan Stanley said last week. But the decline then was temporary, with trends recovering over a few months, and governments are now better prepared to face a potential threat, Morgan Stanley said.Performance-wise, the MSCI Europe Apparel and Luxury Goods lagged the MSCI Europe and the Hang Seng heavily over six weeks as the SARS outbreak worsened. Although it recovered, the ride was volatile until the end of the crisis.But the world has changed over the past two decades and the problem now is one of exposure. Whereas Chinese consumers contributed to 2-3% of luxury goods revenue in 2003, the proportion is now 35%, Exane estimates. Some stocks are more at risk than others, but generally, the biggest players have an average revenue exposure to Asia in excess of 40%.Luxury-goods makers, from LVMH and Kering to Swatch Group AG and Moncler SpA, are increasingly reliant on the China cluster for continued growth, meaning any drop in spending in the region could have serious repercussions for the entire sector. As Flavio Cereda, a Jefferies analyst said last week, “No China, no party.” As other shopping locations such as Hong Kong lose their appeal, consumption in the country “needs to grow as it’s THE driver” for popular brands from Kering’s Gucci and LVMH’s Louis Vuitton to Prada, Cereda added.Given the exposure of the luxury sector to China, and following poor industry data in the fourth quarter, Citi estimates downside risks to the consensus for this year’s revenue and Ebit/EPS around 3% and 10%, respectively. They say the stocks most at risk are Swatch, Prada and Ferragamo (Citi is restricted on LVMH).Valuation is another issue, particularly regarding the luxury winners of 2019, like LVMH or Moncler, reaching the top of the range of the past 10 years, according to Cedric Ozazman, head of investment and portfolio management at Reyl & Cie. in Geneva. This means these companies have “stretched” valuations and need to deliver on the results front again in 2020, with additional earnings-per-share growth of at least 10%, Ozazman says. “Any small miss might actually lead to a de-rating, which will exacerbate any downside move,” he writes. The MSCI Europe Apparel and Luxury Goods still trades at around 60% premium to the MSCI Europe on forward price-to-earnings.That said, the luxury industry’s medium-to-long-term structural underlying growth drivers are still “very solid” and any major price drop in the coming months could be a chance to snap up shares in “high-quality” names such as Hermes International, Moncler and LVMH “where investors have been finding it difficult to find a new entry point,” Morgan Stanley wrote in a note.Noting the lack of visibility, the virus’s impact on the luxury goods sector is difficult to quantify without accurate data, says Isabelle Carpentier, fund manager for international equities at Edmond de Rothschild Asset Management. “However, the first quarter of 2020 could be impacted without tarnishing growth for the whole year,” Carpentier says. “In addition, around half of Chinese consumers’ sales are now made locally, which helps limit the consequences of potential travel stoppages, with the possible transfer of sales to the internet.”Swetha Ramachandran, investment manager of the GAM Global Luxury Brands Fund is upbeat on the “extremely buoyant” broader Chinese consumer picture as the middle class, the biggest driver of luxury-goods demand, continues to grow. Companies might adopt a usual cautious tone for the first quarter, but it’s hard to predict if any will follow the path of Remy Cointreau SA and put their guidance on hold, she says.Ramachandran says there probably will be a short-term hit to demand, merely because of the uncertainty, but in many cases, the reset in valuations could provide a compelling entry point.So are we in the buy-the-dip situation? Not yet, according to Aneeka Gupta, associate research director at asset manager WisdomTree, who expects the negative impact on shares to last for a quarter at least, based on analysis of prior outbreaks, and possibly longer given the situation is “definitely getting worse.”To contact the reporters on this story: Albertina Torsoli in Geneva at atorsoli@bloomberg.net;Michael Msika in London at mmsika4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Blaise Robinson at brobinson58@bloomberg.net, Jon MenonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Looks Like A Quality Company
    Simply Wall St.

    Why Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Looks Like A Quality Company

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

  • Moncler (BIT:MONC) Seems To Use Debt Rather Sparingly
    Simply Wall St.

    Moncler (BIT:MONC) Seems To Use Debt Rather Sparingly

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's...

  • European stocks advance while British equities get left behind as sterling climbs
    MarketWatch

    European stocks advance while British equities get left behind as sterling climbs

    European stocks mostly rose on Thursday, with the exception of U.K. equities, as multinationals suffered from the continued run-up in the British pound.

  • How Much Is a Moncler Puffer Jacket Worth?
    Bloomberg

    How Much Is a Moncler Puffer Jacket Worth?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Moncler SpA’s hotline just blinged. The brand, sported by Drake in his video for the popular song of that name, is being courted by Kering SA, according to Bloomberg News.Moncler has been a fashion-hit maker itself. If Francois-Henri Pinault’s Kering wants to get its hands on it, the Gucci owner will have to pay a price as rich as that commanded by one of its $1,000-plus down jackets.The Italian brand, with a market capitalization of 11 billion euros ($12.2 billion), would bring a sizable name that’s still capable of growth to Kering, valued at 69 billion euros. It would also usefully reduce the French group’s reliance on Gucci, which now accounts for more than 60% of group sales and 80% of operating profit.Moncler has scope to add further stores, particularly flagship locations, in China. While it has successfully expanded its range of products from its core down jackets into knitwear, there is an opportunity in bags and accessories. Kering’s expertise would bolster these ambitions. Digital marketing skills and the French company’s focus on sustainability could be useful too, as younger luxury buyers’ concerns about natural resources, such as down and fur, shape their buying habits.But Moncler won’t come cheap. Assuming a 25% premium over Wednesday’s closing price, a takeover would cost about 12 billion euros, adjusting for estimated net cash of 550 million euros. That equates to about 20.5 times this year’s likely Ebitda, exceeding the multiple that Kering’s French arch-rival LVMH has offered for the iconic diamond and jewelry brand Tiffany & Co.With Moncler forecast to make about 750 million euros of operating profit in 2023, the returns from a deal would be a mere 5% after tax, unless Kering could turbocharge the business. Given that the target is already well run under Remo Ruffini, its chief executive officer and biggest shareholder, that looks like a tall order. Moncler's operating margin is already strong at about 30%.This wouldn’t be a case of taking a tired brand and rejuvenating it. So the pressure would be on Kering to engineer ways of achieving higher sales in order to earn returns at closer to the 7%-8% level that would make a deal easier to justify.The French house can afford Moncler. Assuming an all-cash deal, net debt would increase from 0.4 times Ebitda to 2.4 times. That’s manageable. Kering also has a 16% stake in sportswear maker Puma SE, worth about 1.6 billion euros, to play with. But a deal would wrap up much of Kering’s acquisition firepower up in a puffer jacket, leaving little room to expand into other areas, such as jewelry.There is better value to be found elsewhere, for example in Britain’s Burberry Group Plc, whose recovery plan has yet to pay off. Kering could also bring the skills it used to reinvigorate the Gucci brand to Prada SpA or Salvatore Ferragamo SpA. While this could mean more upfront investment, there is a much bigger turnaround potential.Although Burberry has no controlling family, Prada and Ferragamo do. So far, they have shown no indications of wanting to sell. A reshuffle of Moncler’s ownership recently reduced Ruffini’s stake to 22.5%Even so, Moncler’s down jackets are best known for keeping out the cold. The company has plenty to help it repel a predator, or more likely, make them pay a bulky price.\--With assistance from Chris Hughes.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • MarketWatch

    Moncler surges on report Kering has held talks to buy it

    Shares in Italian jacket maker Moncler surged in Milan after Bloomberg reported Kering , the French luxury brands owner, has held exploratory talks to buy it. Kering shares rose 1.7%. Neither company commented. An analyst at ING said a buyout price could be 13 billion euros ($14.4 billion).

  • Can You Imagine How Chuffed Moncler's (BIT:MONC) Shareholders Feel About Its 215% Share Price Gain?
    Simply Wall St.

    Can You Imagine How Chuffed Moncler's (BIT:MONC) Shareholders Feel About Its 215% Share Price Gain?

    When you buy a stock there is always a possibility that it could drop 100%. But on the bright side, if you buy shares...

  • At €34.20, Is It Time To Put Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) On Your Watch List?
    Simply Wall St.

    At €34.20, Is It Time To Put Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) On Your Watch List?

    Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC), which is in the luxury business, and is based in Italy, received a lot of attention from a...

  • Why You Should Like Moncler S.p.A.’s (BIT:MONC) ROCE
    Simply Wall St.

    Why You Should Like Moncler S.p.A.’s (BIT:MONC) ROCE

    Today we are going to look at Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect...

  • Despite Its High P/E Ratio, Is Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Still Undervalued?
    Simply Wall St.

    Despite Its High P/E Ratio, Is Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Still Undervalued?

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

  • Why Investors Should Embrace Canada Goose’s Maverick Style
    IPO-Edge.com

    Why Investors Should Embrace Canada Goose’s Maverick Style

    Canada Goose Holdings Inc. Reports Fiscal First Quarter Results Wednesday By John Jannarone Canada Goose Holdings Inc.’s unusual – and evolving – business model has ruffled some feathers recently. But for those who do their homework, there’s a chance to reap some luxurious gains. The Toronto-based outerwear maker, which was founded in 1957 make […]

  • Should Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Be Your Next Stock Pick?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) Be Your Next Stock Pick?

    I've been keeping an eye on Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) because I'm attracted to its fundamentals. Looking at the...

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of MONC.MI earnings conference call or presentation 24-Jul-19 5:00pm GMT

    Half Year 2019 Moncler SpA Earnings Call

  • Should You Be Excited About Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) 31% Return On Equity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Excited About Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) 31% Return On Equity?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Is Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) A Financially Strong Company?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) A Financially Strong Company?

    Investors looking for stocks with high market liquidity and little debt on the balance sheet should consider Moncler...

  • Was Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) Earnings Growth Better Than The Industry's?
    Simply Wall St.

    Was Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) Earnings Growth Better Than The Industry's?

    Examining how Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) is performing as a company requires looking at more than just a years...

  • What Should We Expect From Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) Earnings Over The Next Year?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should We Expect From Moncler S.p.A.'s (BIT:MONC) Earnings Over The Next Year?

    In December 2018, Moncler S.p.A. (BIT:MONC) announced its earnings update. Overall, analyst forecasts seem fairly...