WMT - Walmart Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
118.66
+0.50 (+0.42%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close118.16
Open118.36
Bid118.56 x 1000
Ask118.90 x 900
Day's Range117.42 - 118.78
52 Week Range85.78 - 125.38
Volume4,155,774
Avg. Volume5,070,098
Market Cap337.502B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.38
PE Ratio (TTM)23.73
EPS (TTM)5.00
Earnings DateFeb 18, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.12 (1.79%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-05
1y Target Est130.24
  • Have Yourself a Very Vegan Christmas
    Bloomberg

    Have Yourself a Very Vegan Christmas

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- This Christmas, instead of a free-range turkey, how about a beef-less Wellington washed down with a few glasses of “Nosecco”? And rather than falling asleep watching the Queen, why not tune in to your inner self with a spot of meditation?This might not sound like traditional festive fun, but now that the craze for all things vegan has crossed the Atlantic, it’s what British retailers are betting on to lift sluggish supermarket sales and see off brutal conditions on the high street, at least for a spell.A rough estimate suggests that across the big U.K. supermarket chains, meat-free offerings of traditional Christmas fare are up by between 40% and 400% this year. This underlines how veganism has moved from niche to mainstream over the course of 2019 as more  consumers cut out animal products altogether, or reduce their meat intake with a “flexitarian” diet. Just look at the popularity of the vegan sausage roll introduced by baker Greggs Plc. There’s likely to be at least one vegan at any big Christmas gathering, and so being able to cater for them with plant-based canapés is crucial. And while many families won’t ditch the turkey altogether, they may well replace another meat protein, such as beef or gammon, with a fancy nut roast, savory yule log or vegetable wreath. Sales of plant-based substitutes still represent a small share of the overall grocery market, but they can have a significant influence over shopping habits. Being able to buy a good selection of food for a vegan daughter, for example, is likely to determine where shoppers fill up their grocery carts for the whole family. No wonder the category has become a key battleground.There’s another reason why it’s worth supermarkets’ while to go vegan. Plant-based versions of festive favorites such as pigs in blankets tend to be more complex to make and require innovative ingredients. J Sainsbury Plc is this year offering party food made from the blossom of the banana tree, which can be used as a substitute for fish. This builds on the popularity of the jackfruit, a tropical fruit that is a good alternative to pulled pork. All of this added value means supermarkets can charge a premium.QuicktakeThe Vegan EconomyThat won’t last forever though. The U.K. arms of the German discounters Aldi and Lidl are piling into this market too. Lidl has two Christmas-specific vegan lines, while Aldi has nine, including pastry crowns and vegan cocktail sausage rolls. Neither had a plant-based offering last year. Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc recently cut the price of its foods that are free from certain ingredients, such as gluten, while Tesco Plc has launched an affordable plant-based range.In another sign of the times, supermarkets this Christmas season are bulking up on party drinks that are low in alcohol, or contain none at all. Not only do they  tend to be premium products, particularly non-alcoholic spirits, but retailers don’t pay duty. So, while they can charge the same or more for a fancy but sober drink, they get to keep a bigger slice of the selling price.It helps that the market is growing rapidly, as many consumers, particularly younger people captivated more by their social media feeds than their real social life, reduce their alcohol intake. Beer led the way, spawning Budweiser’s Prohibition Brew and Brewdog’s Nanny State, with wines and particularly spirits exploding this year. Demand from supermarket shoppers follows the trend in clubs and pubs where “mocktails” are now a staple of the cocktail menu. Going on the wagon is usually associated with January, but the run-up to Christmas can also be a time for restraint as people become more conscious of pacing themselves through rounds of festive events, not to mention all of those designated drivers. Asda, the U.K. arm of Walmart Inc., estimated that December sales of low- and no-alcohol drinks are double those of the average month. It’s all part of the new mood around Christmas, characterized by rising environmental awareness and a focus on health and wellness. Throw in the ongoing uncertainty around Brexit and the general election, and there are fewer celebrity blockbuster Christmas advertisements this year, with most retailers returning to traditional themes such as family and nostalgia for the past.Even tree trimmings are falling in with the trend. The Sanctuary range from John Lewis features pastel hued baubles including Buddha heads and an ornament depicting a woman reclining in a luxurious bubble bath. Its focus is on serenity — something that’s often in short supply over the busy festive season.After the decorations come down, consumers may continue to embrace plant-based diets with Veganuary, which has rocketed in popularity over the past five years. Dry January will bolster sales of no- and low-alcohol ranges.  But beyond that, it could well be retailers themselves that are in need of some self-care. The months following the holidays are often lean ones, as consumers rein in spending after the excess of Christmas. It can also be tricky for supermarkets to accurately gauge demand and control waste when consumers switch in and out of different food and drink trends so dramatically. This year could be particularly hard if the election is followed by the return of fretting over Brexit. So these swings will be an extra burden to manage.The New Year hangover may still be with us, even if it is an alcohol-free one.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Walmart de Mexico's Nov same-store sales mark best month in 2019

    Walmart de Mexico, the country's biggest retailer, said on Thursday that sales at stores in Mexico open for more than a year rose 6.9% in November, compared with the same month last year, the biggest monthly increase in 2019. Walmex, as the company is known, said total sales in Mexico increased 8.4% in November, while the retailer's overall sales including from its Central American stores reached nearly $61 billion pesos ($3.15 billion) for the month. Sales growth at all of its stores also hit a monthly high for the year at 8.4%, the company said in a statement.

  • Triad retail building sells for $19.2 million
    American City Business Journals

    Triad retail building sells for $19.2 million

    A Chicago-area investment firm has purchased a large Triad retail building for $19.2 million. Middleton Partners of Northbrook, Illinois, bought the 200,000-plus square foot Walmart (NYSE: WMT) Supercenter at 1226 E.

  • Walmart to ramp up Central Florida hiring
    American City Business Journals

    Walmart to ramp up Central Florida hiring

    Walmart Inc. is set to add more jobs in Central Florida after having some positive financial results in the last fiscal quarter. The Bentonville, Arkansas-based retailer (NYSE: WMT) will hire over 200 full-time hourly positions at its grocery distribution center at 4505 State Road 524 in Cocoa after a 41% gain in U.S. e-commerce sales during the last fiscal quarter. Jobs the company will look to hire include order fillers, forklift drivers and other distribution workers.

  • Kroger (KR) Earnings Miss Estimates in Q3, Decline Y/Y
    Zacks

    Kroger (KR) Earnings Miss Estimates in Q3, Decline Y/Y

    Kroger's (KR) third-quarter sales fell short of the Zacks Consensus Estimate. This was the second straight quarter of sales miss. Nonetheless, management forecast identical sales growth of 2-2.25% for fiscal 2019.

  • Kroger Needs to Pare Down Its Grocery List
    Bloomberg

    Kroger Needs to Pare Down Its Grocery List

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It was never going to be easy for Kroger Co., the nation’s largest supermarket chain, to play defense at a moment of colossal change in the grocery business.That was apparent in its Thursday earnings report, in which revenue and adjusted earnings per share revenue came in slightly below analysts’ expectations, sending shares down. (On the bright side, comparable sales growth accelerated, increasing 2.5% from a year earlier.)The patchy results are the latest reason to doubt that this company is going to be able to transform itself for a more digital-centric future before it’s too late.At a presentation for analysts last month, CEO Rodney McMullen acknowledged that, two years into a three-year turnaround plan, the company has come up short. In particular, he said, “we asked our store associates to do too many things at once,” a reference to its efforts to remodel stores and make better use of shelf space while simultaneously ramping up its click-and-collect business.It is concerning that Kroger apparently has found it so difficult to do retailing battle on multiple fronts. After all, that is simply the reality of being a major brick-and-mortar chain these days, and key rivals seem to be managing it just fine.Target Corp. has renovated about 700 stores since 2017 and has also managed to roll out same-day delivery via Shipt and expand curbside pickup. In the latest quarter, 80% of its digital growth came from those and other same-day fulfillment options. Walmart Inc. has had similar success, developing an online grocery operation that is competitive with Amazon.com Inc.’s while also making physical stores cleaner and better-stocked.It’s not just that Kroger needs to be able to multitask. It also needs a better plan to win at online grocery.In a recent press release, Kroger proudly touted that, as a holiday season promotion, it would offer online grocery pickup for free and waive the usual $4.95 fee. Are shoppers seriously supposed to be impressed by that when pickup is always free at Walmart and Target? If Kroger can’t match that offering, it’s hard to see how it is going to fight effectively for digital grocery market share.Kroger’s biggest e-commerce bet is its partnership with Ocado Group Plc to build automated warehouses for grocery delivery. But those efficiencies will only matter if it can build a substantial base of online customers. And the cost of building these one-of-a-kind facilities, executives have said recently, is coming in higher than expected.In the meantime, Kroger continues to make head-scratching moves such as its foray into the world of so-called “dark kitchens,” or delivery-only food preparation facilities. Through a partnership with the cheekily named ClusterTruck, it announced this week, Kroger will experiment with on-demand delivery of prepared meals.This effectively puts the supermarket chain in competition for the diners that Grubhub, Doordash and Uber Eats are after. This category has enormous growth potential, so Kroger’s ambitions are understandable. But it’s also an area in which restaurant and technology companies have a head start and seem destined to outflank Kroger. And the whole venture seems like a distraction from the more pressing mission of shoring up its positioning in its core grocery business.Kroger’s three-year plan was underwhelming when it was unveiled two years ago, and since then the company hasn’t consistently impressed with its execution. Kroger is undoubtedly a busy company, but it’s not clear all the hustle is making it a better one.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 10 Easiest Instruments To Learn For A Child
    Insider Monkey

    10 Easiest Instruments To Learn For A Child

    What are the easiest instruments to learn for a child? As a parent, by now, you would know kids have excellent aptitude for learning new things. Playing a musical instrument is a sure way of putting your kid's creative energies to good use. In addition to working their body parts, music instruments also help sharpen […]

  • 3 Secrets To Target's Recent Success You May Have Overlooked
    Investor's Business Daily

    3 Secrets To Target's Recent Success You May Have Overlooked

    Cowen's deep dive into Target's digital business uncovered three key reasons why robust growth is likely to continue.

  • Americans are ‘absolutely appalled’ by the lack of a national data-privacy law, says Republican Sen. Blackburn
    MarketWatch

    Americans are ‘absolutely appalled’ by the lack of a national data-privacy law, says Republican Sen. Blackburn

    Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday talked up the need for a federal law that would deliver better protections for personal data, even as some analysts don’t think bipartisan agreement on the issue is likely in the near term.

  • Walmart favors 'reasonable controls' over collection and use of personal data
    Reuters

    Walmart favors 'reasonable controls' over collection and use of personal data

    Walmart Inc for the first time on Wednesday revealed the breadth of customer information it collects as it came out in favor of consumers having "reasonable controls" with regard to collection, use and sharing of personal data. The world's largest retailer said shoppers should have an opportunity to "reasonably access, correct or delete their data while limiting the sale of their data to third parties and its use in digital advertising," as it testified at a hearing by the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. The hearing, which was also attended by companies like Microsoft, was convened to examine various legislative proposals to protect consumer data privacy.

  • Kroger (KR) to Report Q3 Earnings as Amazon Guns for Supermarket Space
    Zacks

    Kroger (KR) to Report Q3 Earnings as Amazon Guns for Supermarket Space

    Kroger (KR) will report its third quarter financial performance before the opening bell on Thursday, December 5.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's

  • Not Santa, Trade Will Rule This December: ETFs to Your Rescue
    Zacks

    Not Santa, Trade Will Rule This December: ETFs to Your Rescue

    Despite the age-old trend of a Santa rally, 2018 was a massive downer. Since 2019 is giving the same cues, investors can seek refuge in these safer ETFs.

  • Dollar General Q3 Earnings on Deck: Can DG Stock Reach New Highs?
    Zacks

    Dollar General Q3 Earnings on Deck: Can DG Stock Reach New Highs?

    Dollar General (DG) is set to report its third quarter earnings before the market opens on Thursday, December 5.

  • Disney is giving us Baby Yoda toys for Christmas
    MarketWatch

    Disney is giving us Baby Yoda toys for Christmas

    You can now preorder a plush toy of the breakout star of “The Mandalorian” on Disney+ from Walmart and Disney.com

  • Billions of pain pills were supplied in North Carolina -- here's where they went
    American City Business Journals

    Billions of pain pills were supplied in North Carolina -- here's where they went

    Between 2006 and 2012, the data shows more than 2.5 billion prescription pain pills were supplied to North Carolina.

  • Top ETF Stories of November
    Zacks

    Top ETF Stories of November

    Inside the key ETF events of the month of November.

  • Can Retailers Close in on Amazon (AMZN) this Holiday Season?
    Zacks

    Can Retailers Close in on Amazon (AMZN) this Holiday Season?

    Competition between major retailers and e-commerce companies is heating up as they elbow for position during Cyber Monday and beyond.

  • Walmart tops Amazon as most-downloaded US shopping app on Black Friday
    TechCrunch

    Walmart tops Amazon as most-downloaded US shopping app on Black Friday

    Amazon says Cyber Monday 2019 has now become the retailer's biggest shopping day of all time, based on the number of items sold worldwide. This year, Walmart became the No. 1 shopping app in the U.S. on Black Friday for the first time ever, according to Sensor Tower's analysis. Walmart's app reached No. 1 among all shopping in the U.S. after peaking on Thanksgiving as No. 6 among all apps (not just shopping), noted App Annie, based on both iOS and Android downloads.

  • Benzinga

    DarioHealth Rips Higher On Walmart Distribution Deal

    Shares of digital health company DarioHealth Corp (NASDAQ: DRIO ) are advancing strongly Tuesday. DarioHealth said its Dario-powered digital diabetes app has been launched on Walmart Inc's (NYSE: WMT ) ...

  • Kroger Partners With ClusterTruck for Meal Delivery Service
    Zacks

    Kroger Partners With ClusterTruck for Meal Delivery Service

    Kroger (KR) has been strengthening its position in the omnichannel food retail space. With the help of ClusterTruck, the company will be able to offer multiple food items from one central kitchen.

  • Industrial fire triggers emergency air-quality alerts in Arkansas town
    ABC News Videos

    Industrial fire triggers emergency air-quality alerts in Arkansas town

    The blaze at a Styrofoam factory threw a huge plume of smoke into the air over Bentonville; students at local schools were ordered to stay inside but no injuries were reported.

  • UBS' Tracy Byrnes: Trump 'needs a deal' with China
    Yahoo Finance Video

    UBS' Tracy Byrnes: Trump 'needs a deal' with China

    UBS Financial Services Tracy Byrnes joins Yahoo Finance's Scott Gamm to discuss the implications of the U.S.-China trade war and how investors should be looking at their portfolios going into 2020.