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  • Here’s how one of Google’s top scientists thinks people should prepare for machine learning
    Business
    CNBC.com23 hours ago

    Here’s how one of Google’s top scientists thinks people should prepare for machine learning

    People like famed physicist Stephen Hawking and Tesla's Elon Musk have issued dark warnings of a world where computers become so sophisticated, so quickly, that humanity loses control of them—and its own destiny as a result. Yet Peter Norvig, a leading artificial intelligence scientist and a director of research at Google, thinks that's far-fetched. "I don't buy into the killer robot [theory]," he told CNBC this week. The real worry is how to prepare for the mass elimination of jobs that is surely coming, he said. "I certainly see that there will be disruptions in employment … we've already seen a lot of change, that's going to continue," Norvig said in an interview, before a lecture on machine

  • Politics
    MarketWatchyesterday

    These are the 5 U.S. companies with the biggest overseas cash piles

    The Trump administration’s proposal to lower the corporate tax rate to 15% has revived hopes that big U.S. companies will soon be motivated to bring back massive overseas cash piles. U.S. companies had about $1.3 trillion in cash held in overseas accounts at the end of 2016, according to Moody’s Investors Service. Apple Inc.(AAPL)has the most cash overseas of any U.S. company at about $230 billion, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

  • Millennials owe a record amount of debt, and it could become a huge drag on the economy
    Business
    Business Insideryesterday

    Millennials owe a record amount of debt, and it could become a huge drag on the economy

    US consumer debt is approaching a record 20% of GDP, and millennials owe most of it. Millennials — 21 to 34-year-olds — hold an estimated $1.1 trillion of the country's $3.6 trillion in consumer debt, according to UBS, as rising student and auto loans outweigh a drop in mortgages. There is already evidence that millennials are changing their spending habits on smaller items where, according to Lindsay Drucker Mann of Goldman Sachs Research, millennials are willing to search for the lowest price on an item or patiently wait for the right deal to pop up.