U.S. Markets closed
  • Something Big Is Happening on Amazon That Should Terrify Macy's, Target and Sears
    Business
    The Street3 hours ago

    Something Big Is Happening on Amazon That Should Terrify Macy's, Target and Sears

    Who cares about trying on new clothes in a store's dressing room to see if they fit. Apparently, not many folks.  According to a new survey from Morgan Stanley, nearly 46 percent of consumers purchased clothes on Amazon (AMZN) over the last twelve months. This marked the second highest percentage in the survey, trailing only Walmart's (WMT) 60 percent. Purchase frequency seems to be picking up, too, as Morgan Stanley found that 36 percent of consumers have purchased clothing on Amazon a "few times" this year vs. 31 percent a year ago.  The survey was conducted online in the U.S. with 1,000 adults age 18 and over from April 4 to April 12. There were some alarming stats in the survey that should

  • Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke Just Crushed Everyone's Hope for a Tax Cut Miracle
    Business
    The Street13 hours ago

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke Just Crushed Everyone's Hope for a Tax Cut Miracle

    This article originally appeared at 07:30 ET on Tuesday on Real Money, our premium site for active traders. Click here to get great columns like this from Brian Sozzi and other writers even earlier in the trading day If comments from Alibaba's (BABA) founder Jack Ma on Monday weren't enough to ruin your view of the future, allow former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke to add an extra dose of depression on Tuesday. "We might have lower tax rates, maybe balanced to some extent by closing some loopholes, that would be a better policy," Bernanke said in a new interview with the New York Times. "I don't think it's going create a productivity miracle or anything like that, but it would be more

  • Half of the high-paying jobs in America now require this skill
    Business
    MarketWatch2 hours ago

    Half of the high-paying jobs in America now require this skill

    If terms like SQL, Python and JavaScript aren’t on your radar, employers may not be interested in hiring you. Roughly half of the jobs in the top income quartile — defined as those paying $57,000 or more per year — are in occupations that commonly require applicants to have at least some computer coding knowledge or skill, according to an analysis of 26 million U.S. online job postings by job market analytics firm Burning Glass and Oracle Academy, the philanthropic arm of Oracle focused on computer science education, in Redwood City, Calif. In simple terms, coders write the instructions that tell computers what to do; in-demand programming languages include SQL, Java, JavaScript, C# and Python.